Navigation Links
Exposure to both traffic, indoor pollutants puts some kids at higher risk for asthma later

CINCINNATINew research presents strong evidence that the "synergistic" effect of early-life exposure to both outdoor traffic-related pollution and indoor endotoxin causes more harm to developing lungs than one or the other exposure alone.

Environmental health scientists at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have shown that children exposed to both high levels of traffic-related particles and indoor endotoxin during early life are six times more likely to experience persistent wheezing than children exposed to low levels of traffic and indoor-related pollutants.

They report their findings in the Dec. 1, 2009, edition of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. This is believed to be the first study to look at the combined effects of traffic-related exposures and sampled endotoxin in children during infancy as an indicator of asthma later in life. Endotoxin, a component of bacteria thought to trigger an immune response in humans, was measured from dust samples collected prior to age 1.

Based on a long-term study of children deemed at high risk for allergies later in life, UC environmental health researchers have found that 36 percent of the children studied who were exposed to high levels of both traffic-related pollution and indoor endotoxin demonstrated persistent wheezing at age 3, an early warning sign of asthma and other pulmonary conditions. Only 11 percent of children exposed to low levels of both indoor and outdoor allergens experienced wheezing; 18 percent of children exposed to low levels of indoor endotoxin and high levels of traffic-related particles experienced persistent wheezing. Endotoxin exposure alone appeared to have little effect.

"There is a clear synergistic effect from co-exposure to traffic-related particles and endotoxin above and beyond what you would see with a single exposure that can be connected to persistent wheezing by age 3," explains Patrick Ryan, PhD, lead author of the study and a research assistant professor of environmental health at UC."These two exposure sourceswhen simultaneously present at high levelsappear to work together to negatively impact the health of young children with developing lungs."

To conduct this study, Ryan and his colleagues utilized land-use regression modeling to calculate study participants' exposures to traffic-related particles, such as diesel exhaust. The model was designed to capture exposures at locations where the child spent more than eight hours a week between birth and age 3; for example, in their homes or at day care.

"Traffic-related particles and endotoxin both seem to trigger an inflammatory response in the children monitored in this study. When put together, that effect is amplified to have a greater impact on the body's response," adds Ryan. "The earlier in life this type of exposure occurs, the more impact it may have long term. Lung development occurs in children up through age 18 or 20. Exposure earlier in life to both endotoxin and traffic will have a greater impact on developing lungs compared to adults whose lungs are already developed."


Contact: Amanda Harper
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Related biology news :

1. Meth exposure in young adults leads to long-term behavioral consequences
2. UCR engineers to develop new tool to measure how environmental exposures affect health
3. Researchers developing device to predict proper light exposure for human health
4. Nanoparticle exposures happen, says expert
5. Time spent in car drives up air pollution exposure
6. MIT: Prenatal arsenic exposure detected in newborns
7. Moderate prenatal exposure to alcohol and stress in monkeys can cause touch sensitivity
8. Low exposure to asbestos-like mineral from Montana vermiculite may up lung disease risk
9. Exposure to low levels of radon appears to reduce the risk of lung cancer, new study finds
10. Early exposure to common weed killer impairs amphibian development
11. OSU study shows exposure to bad air raises blood pressure
Post Your Comments:
(Date:3/30/2017)... LOS ANGELES , March 30, 2017  On ... Hack the Genome hackathon at ... This exciting two-day competition will focus on developing health ... experience. Hack the Genome is ... has been tremendous. The world,s largest companies in the ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... , March 29, 2017  higi, the health IT ... North America , today announced a ... the acquisition of EveryMove. The new investment and acquisition ... of tools to transform population health activities through the ... data. higi collects and secures data today ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... 24, 2017 The Controller General of Immigration from ... Abdulla Algeen have received the prestigious international IAIR Award for the ... Continue Reading ... ... Controller Abdulla Algeen (small picture on the right) have received the IAIR ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/10/2017)... Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) , ... ... ... Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a development-stage cancer-focused pharmaceutical company advancing targeted antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) ... all uses of targeted HPLN (Hybrid Polymerized Liposomal Nanoparticle), a technology developed ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... USDM Life ... for the life sciences and healthcare industries, announces a presentation by Subbu Viswanathan ... The presentation, “Automating GxP Validation for Agile Cloud Platforms,” will present a revolutionary ...
(Date:10/9/2017)... ... October 09, 2017 , ... The Giving Tree Wellness Center ... the needs of consumers who are incorporating medical marijuana into their wellness and ... , As operators of two successful Valley dispensaries, The Giving Tree’s two founders, ...
(Date:10/6/2017)... ... October 06, 2017 , ... The HealthTech Venture ... sector at their fourth annual Conference where founders, investors, innovative practitioners and collaborators ... ELEVATE pitch competition showcasing early stage digital health and med tech companies. , ...
Breaking Biology Technology: