Navigation Links
Experts Weigh the Pros and Cons of a $1.7 Billion EPA Cleanup Plan for the Passaic River at an NJIT
Date:7/24/2014

Environmental cleanup experts gathered at NJIT this week for an all-day public forum on a $1.7 billion proposal by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to dredge toxic sediment from an eight-mile stretch of the lower Passaic River.

The EPA has called the plan, which proposes removing 4.3 million cubic yards of contaminated sediments and capping sections of the riverbed, one of the largest cleanups in the agency's history. The toxic material would be dredged and disposed off-site.

"We need to ensure the future well-being of humans and other organisms. NJIT is committed to being part of the solution," said Fadi Deek, the university's provost, in opening remarks. A nine-member panel of experts and environmental advocates then took questions from the audience about the proposals for sediment disposal and further dredging for navigation.

"It's important for members of the affected community to look at the proposal carefully, because there are technical aspects of the plan that lay audiences might not fully appreciate," said Jay Meegoda, a professor of civil and environmental engineering and waste disposal expert, who organized the conference. The invited panelist included representatives from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the Passaic River Coalition, among others.

Meegoda, who sits on the EPA's Passaic River Citizen Advisory Committee and also took part in the panel discussion, noted that the EPA held three prior public meetings on the plan, but said that none were "technical forums."

"EPA's proposal for off-site disposal would cost $700 million more than if the sediment were deposited in what are called Confined Aquatic Disposal (CAD) cells in Newark Bay itself. Environmental groups are opposed to CAD cells, but they are not all aware that under the off-site disposal plan, the dredged material would be processed in a large facility within the affected communities to remove water and to solidify sediments for rail transport," Meegoda said.

The sediment in the Passaic is contaminated with dioxin, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), heavy metals, pesticides and other industrial pollutants deposited by manufacturers along the river over the past century. The EPA notes that a major source of dioxin in the river is pollution from the Diamond Alkali facility in Newark, which produced Agent Orange and pesticides during the 1960s.

"The contamination is far above the EPA's accepted levels and poses a significant risk to people who eat fish from the river and to the wildlife itself," said Alice Yeh, a remedial project manager for the EPA.

The EPA announced its proposal in April after seven years of study. It was developed in consultation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and with outreach to representatives of the communities along the river. The EPA is still accepting public comment until August 20, 2014.


'/>"/>
Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Experts voice concerns over arsenic in rice, reports Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
2. Top aging research experts to present at 43rd Annual American Aging Association Conference
3. Solar energy prospects are bright for Scotland, experts say
4. MIPT experts reveal the secret of radiation vulnerability
5. Wildlife response to climate change is likely underestimated, experts warn
6. International research group recognizes UTMB experts
7. Experts disagree on horses with incoordination
8. The metrology experts of the future come from Braunschweig
9. More dangerous chemicals in everyday life: Now experts warn against nanosilver
10. Forensic experts compile guide on how to ID child abuse, starvation
11. International experts swarm to London for bee health summit
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/23/2017)... ITHACA, N.Y. , June 23, 2017  IBM ... in dairy research, today announced a new collaboration using ... the chances that the global milk supply is impacted ... project, Cornell University has become the newest academic institution ... Chain, a food safety initiative that includes IBM Research, ...
(Date:5/6/2017)... RAM Group , Singaporean based ... in biometric authentication based on a novel  ... to perform biometric authentication. These new sensors are based on ... Ram Group and its partners. This sensor will have ... and security. Ram Group is a next generation ...
(Date:4/13/2017)... April 13, 2017 UBM,s Advanced Design and ... will feature emerging and evolving technology through its 3D ... will run alongside the expo portion of the event ... and demonstrations focused on trending topics within 3D printing ... and manufacturing event will take place June 13-15, 2017 at ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/19/2017)... ... September 19, 2017 , ... A best-selling author and ... companies. “Grit” author Angela Duckworth and her team at Character Lab have joined ... an international law firm with decades of experience supporting high-growth companies in the ...
(Date:9/19/2017)... MI (PRWEB) , ... September 19, 2017 , ... ... laboratory, is pleased to announce the recipients of its 2017 Science Student Award. ... exceptional leadership qualities, and involvement with community service defray the costs of obtaining ...
(Date:9/18/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... September 18, 2017 , ... ... has announced the move of the SPIE Digital Library ( http://www.spiedigitallibrary.org ) on ... SPIE to create an improved user experience and incorporate a number of enhancements ...
(Date:9/14/2017)... Ind (PRWEB) , ... September ... ... AMRI’s Global Analytical Services, formally introduces its flexible scientist program (FSP)-- a ... volume-based, preferred-rate pricing. The FSP, which combines SSCI’s extensive project-based analytical and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: