Navigation Links
Exercise eases arthritis in obese mice even without weight loss
Date:9/26/2011

DURHAM, N.C. Adding another incentive to exercise, scientists at Duke University Medical Center have found that physical activity improves arthritis symptoms even among obese mice that continue to chow down on a high-fat diet.

The insight suggests that excess weight alone isn't what causes the aches and pains of osteoarthritis, despite the long-held notion that carrying extra pounds strains the joints and leads to the inflammatory condition.

Published Sept. 27 online in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism, the findings are now being tested in people.

"What's surprising is that exercise, without substantial weight loss, can be beneficial to the joints," said Farshid Guilak, Ph.D., professor of orthopaedic surgery at Duke and senior author of the study. "Ideally, it would be best to be fit and lose a little weight, but this shows that exercise alone can improve the health of your joints."

Even modest improvements could have a major impact if the findings are borne out in people. The Arthritis Foundation reports that one in five adults in the United States have been diagnosed with arthritis, and the annual cost of treating it and other rheumatic conditions has been tabbed at $128 billion.

Many cases of arthritis are associated with obesity and inactivity, so the Duke researchers set out to determine whether a high fat diet induces knee osteoarthritis, and then whether exercise provides a protective effect.

Using two sets of male mice half fed a high-fat diet and the other fed regular chow the researchers noted significant differences among the two groups. The mice on the high-fat food gained weight rapidly, processed glucose poorly and had much higher blood levels of molecules that trigger the chronic inflammation associated with osteoarthritis.

But when these animals got regular running wheel workouts, many of the harmful effects diminished even though the mice ate the same high-fat food and shed no weight. Glucose tolerance improved, while the inflammatory response was disrupted among key signaling molecules called cytokines, easing the development of arthritis.

If the extra weight on the joints had been the cause of the arthritis, the researchers noted, exercise would have exacerbated the problem. Instead, it helped.

"We're trying to understand the interaction of physical activity and obesity," said Timothy M. Griffin, Ph.D., lead author of the study. Griffin was formerly at Duke and is now at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation. "Even though there was the same amount of body fat, the fat was different."

Griffin said the fat cells still produced inflammatory molecules associated with arthritis, but they lost their punch because they could not organize into a force: "I don't want to say exercise is turning off that inflammatory signal, it just impairs it."

The findings add to a growing body of research exploring fitness vs. fatness. Ongoing studies at Duke and elsewhere are examining the role of diet, exercise and inflammatory diseases.

"This shows that if you are obese, it's better to exercise," Guilak said. "Sometimes pain can be a barrier to starting exercise, but if you overcome it, in the long term, it's better."


'/>"/>

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Have brain fatigue? A bout of exercise may be the cure
2. New UNH data tests the exercise talk test
3. Exercise boosts health by influencing stem cells to become bone, not fat, McMaster researchers find
4. Aerobic exercise bests resistance training at burning belly fat
5. Even with regular exercise, people with inactive lifestyles more at risk for chronic diseases
6. Exercise has numerous beneficial effects on brain health and cognition, review suggests
7. Red wine: Exercise in a bottle?
8. Exercise produces positive effects on the intervertebral discs
9. New research: Post-exercise recovery advantages of lowfat chocolate milk
10. Office of Naval Research Supports Exercise at Arctic Test Range
11. Vitamin E may increase or decrease the risk of pneumonia depending on smoking and exercise
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/20/2017)... At this year,s CeBIT Chancellor Dr. Angela Merkel visited the ... the DERMALOG stand together with the Japanese Prime Minster Shinzo Abe. ... largest German biometrics company the two government leaders could see the three ... as DERMALOG´s multi-biometrics system.   Continue Reading ... ...
(Date:3/16/2017)... 16, 2017 CeBIT 2017 - Against identity fraud with DERMALOG solutions ... ... Used combined in one project, multi-biometric solutions provide a crucial contribution against ... Used combined in one project, ... ...
(Date:3/9/2017)... , March 9, 2017 4Dx has ... World Lung Imaging Workshop at the University of Pennsylvania. ... invited to deliver the latest data to world leaders ... event brings together leaders at the forefront of the ... lung imaging. "The quality of the ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/28/2017)... , March 28, 2017 Biostage, Inc. ... company developing bioengineered organ implants to treat cancers and ... today announced that Jim McGorry, CEO of ... BioEngineering panel at the MassBio 2017 Annual ... PM ET in Cambrige, Massachussetts. The 3D Printing ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... , ... March 28, 2017 , ... ... and diminished effectiveness over time. A recent study published in STEM CELLS suggests ... stimulating subventricular zone (SVZ) stem cells to produce more neural cells. , ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... March 28, 2017 , ... ... fully-certified hygienic SWB805 MultiMountTM weigh modules. These weigh modules are designed according ... National Sanitation Foundation (NSF). , As fully integrated weighing solutions, SWB805 MultiMount ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... , ... March 28, 2017 , ... ... the development of a new orally administered treatment for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), today ... John Didsbury states, “As we seek to uniquely treat the metabolic dysfunctions inherent ...
Breaking Biology Technology: