Navigation Links
Evolution of flying bat clue to cancer and viruses
Date:12/21/2012

The genes of long-living and virus resistant bats may provide clues to the future treatment and prevention of infectious diseases and cancer in people, researchers have found.

Published in the journal Science, the research provides an insight into the evolution of bat's flight, resistance to viruses and relatively long life.

Researchers at CSIRO and the Beijing Genome Institute led a team sequencing the genomes of two bat species - an Australian mega bat, the black flying fox, and a Chinese micro bat, David's Myotis. They then compared the bat genomes to the genomes of eight other mammals, including humans, to find similarities and differences.

Dr Chris Cowled, post-doctoral fellow at CSIRO's Australian Animal Health Laboratory, said the research may eventually lead to strategies to prevent or treat disease in humans. "A deeper understanding of these evolutionary adaptations in bats may lead to better treatments for human diseases, and may eventually enable us to predict or perhaps even prevent outbreaks of emerging bat viruses," Dr Cowled said.

"Bats are a natural reservoir for several lethal viruses, such as Hendra, Ebola and SARS, but they often don't succumb to disease from these viruses. They're also the only mammal that can fly, and they live a long time compared to animals similar in size," Dr Cowled said. "Flying is a very energy intensive activity that produces toxic by-products but we can see that bats have some novel genes to deal with these toxins," he said. Some of these genes, including P53, are implicated in the development of cancer or the detection and repair of damaged DNA. "

What we found intriguing was that some of these genes also have secondary roles in the immune system," Dr Cowled said. "We're proposing that the evolution of flight led to a sort of spill over effect, influencing not only the immune system, but also things like ageing and cancer."

The research also reaffirms bats' ancient and important place in the eco-system, particularly as pollinators and controlling insect numbers. "They've been around since the time of the dinosaurs, at least 65 million years, and they're among the most abundant and widespread mammals on the earth."
'/>"/>

Contact: John Smith
John.M.Smith@csiro.au
61-732-142-960
CSIRO Australia
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Report from the front lines of personalized reproductive medicine revolution
2. Advance in chromosomal evolution in sea cradles
3. Tracking gene flow in marine plant evolution
4. Monkey business: What howler monkeys can tell us about the role of interbreeding in human evolution
5. Carnegie debuts revolutionary biosphere mapping capability at AGU
6. Algae held captive and genes stolen in crime of evolution
7. New evidence of dinosaurs role in the evolution of bird flight
8. Pear genome provides new insight into breeding improvement and evolutionary trace analysis
9. Were in this together: A pathbreaking investigation into the evolution of cooperative behavior
10. Recent studies bring fossils and genes together to piece together evolutionary history
11. British Ecological Society partners with Wiley open access journal Ecology and Evolution
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/2/2017)... , March 2, 2017 Summary ... better understand Merck KGaA and its partnering interests and ... https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/3605601/ Description The Partnering Deals and Alliance ... partnering activity of one of the world,s leading life ... prepared upon purchase to ensure inclusion of the most ...
(Date:2/28/2017)... , February 28, 2017 News solutions for ... ... from 14 to 16 March, Materna will present ... show how seamless travel is a real benefit for passengers. ... biometrics to their passenger touch point solutions to take passengers through ...
(Date:2/22/2017)... LONDON , Feb. 22, 2017 ... by 2021, ABI Research identifies four technologies that ... solutions to secure significant share in the changing ... payments, and passive authentication.   "Companies ... it comes to security," says Dimitrios Pavlakis ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/23/2017)... 23, 2017  GlobeImmune, Inc. today announced it has ... of 12,835,490 shares of its common stock to NantCell, ... connection with the sale of its common stock, NantCell ... issue to GlobeImmune 200,000 shares, an estimated $2.0 million ... "We are pleased to enter into this strategic agreement ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... NEW YORK , March 23, 2017 ... ... causes of death, putting significant strain on health care systems, ... of cancer diagnoses rises, so too does the development of ... with minimum side effects. Among the many types of cancer ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... 23, 2017 , ... Advanced Polymer Monitoring Technologies (APMT), a ... “Sig” Floyd as Vice President ? Global Business Development. Dr. Floyd will lead ... Floyd’s career has spanned 30 years in the chemicals and equipment industries. Sig ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... Calif. , March 22, 2017  UBM ... proud to announce their extended partnership and the ... be headlined by the 21 st Annual ... Boston, taking place May 3-4, 2017. ... Medical Technology Association (ADVAMED) President and CEO, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: