Navigation Links
Even with regular exercise, people with inactive lifestyles more at risk for chronic diseases
Date:8/2/2011

COLUMBIA, Mo. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 25 percent of Americans have inactive lifestyles (they take fewer than 5,000 steps a day) and 75 percent do not meet the weekly exercise recommendations (150 minutes of moderate activity each week and muscle-strengthening activity twice a week) to maintain good health. After reviewing recent literature, University of Missouri researchers contend that physical inactivity is the primary cause of chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity and fatty liver disease and that even people who set aside time for exercise regularly but are otherwise sedentary, may not be active enough to combat these diseases. Inactivity, in addition to the availability of high-caloric food has led to an increased rate of metabolic dysfunction in Americans.

In a recent study, John Thyfault, assistant professor in the departments of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology and Internal Medicine, found that negative physiological changes associated with a higher risk for type 2 diabetes, occur in people who transition from high amounts of activity (greater than 10,000 steps a day) to inactivity (fewer than 5,000 steps each day).

"If people spend the majority of their time sitting, even with regular periods of exercise, they are still at greater risk for chronic diseases," Thyfault said. "If people can add some regular movement into their routines throughout the day, they will feel better and be less susceptible to health problems. In the long term, they may not see big changes in the mirror, but they will prevent further weight gain."

According to Scott Rector, assistant professor in the departments of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology and Internal Medicine, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a relatively new epidemic related to the recent increase in obesity and physical inactivity rates. The disease, which is the most common chronic liver condition among U.S. adults, occurs when excess fat accumulates in the liver. This change disrupts glucose regulation and contributes to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. NAFLD progresses more rapidly in young people than in adults and has become more common in children.

"Everyone should try to take at least 10,000 steps a day," Rector said. "It doesn't have to happen all at once, but 500 to 1,000 steps every few hours is a good goal. Small changes can increase the number of steps people take in their daily routines. Changes might include taking the stairs instead of the elevator, walking to a coworker's office rather than calling, or planning time for short walks throughout the day."

Rector said research shows that more active kids are less likely to have fatty liver disease. If doctors and parents intervene and compel children to exercise and lose weight, it will lower their body fat and provide long-term health benefits if they sustain those lifestyle changes.


'/>"/>

Contact: Samantha Craven
slctw4@mail.mizzou.edu
573-882-9144
University of Missouri-Columbia
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Sinbad Sweets(TM) Offers Select New Desserts at 50% Off Regular Price
2. Regular aerobic exercise is good for the brain, Pitt team says
3. JDRF-funded studies show regular CGM use increases diabetes control for all age groups
4. Genetic irregularities linked to higher risk of COPD among smokers
5. Regular family meals result in better eating habits for adolescents
6. Reading food labels, combined with exercise, can lead to weight loss
7. During exercise, the human brain shifts into high gear on alternative energy
8. Scientists take a giant step for people -- with plants!
9. Study: People at risk for panic buffered from stressor by high levels of physical activity
10. The truth about cats and dogs: Pets are good for mental health of everyday people
11. Jewel beetles, obtained from local people, turn out to be 4 species unknown to science
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Even with regular exercise, people with inactive lifestyles more at risk for chronic diseases
(Date:3/30/2017)... , March 30, 2017 Trends, opportunities and ... and behavioral), by technology (fingerprint, AFIS, iris recognition, facial ... and others), by end use industry (government and law ... financial and banking, and others), and by region ( ... , Asia Pacific , and the ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... March 28, 2017 The report ... (Camera, Monitors, Servers, Storage Devices), Software (Video Analytics, VMS), ... - Global Forecast to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the ... and is projected to reach USD 75.64 Billion by ... 2022. The base year considered for the study is ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... The Controller General of Immigration from Maldives Mr. Mohamed Anwar ... prestigious international IAIR Award for the most innovative high security ePassport and ... ... Maldives Immigration Controller General, Mr. Mohamed ... the right) have received the IAIR award for the "Most innovative high ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/20/2017)... June 20, 2017  Kibow Biotech Inc., a pioneer ... the issuance of a new patent covering a unique ... the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on May 23 ... the Buzz of Bio award in 2014 in ... developing non-drug approaches to chronic disease. Renadylâ„¢, the first ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... ... ... Do More with OHAUS , With the launch of the new laboratory equipment ... to extending its expertise across the entire laboratory to a range of life science ... for its customers to 'Do More' in the lab. , Efficiency and Safety ...
(Date:6/19/2017)... ... June 19, 2017 , ... As Vice President, ... products including training, implementation, support, and client process and SOP development. , Mr. ... previously held leadership roles for service providers and top-tier pharmaceuticals, and as an ...
(Date:6/19/2017)... King of Prussia, PA (PRWEB) , ... June 19, 2017 , ... ... by life sciences companies for over 50 years. One of the biggest challenges faced ... environment. Joining the firm’s regulatory affairs services team is Kati Abraham , who ...
Breaking Biology Technology: