Navigation Links
Even mild traumatic brain injuries can kill brain tissue
Date:3/7/2013

AUGUSTA, Ga. Scientists have watched a mild traumatic brain injury play out in the living brain, prompting swelling that reduces blood flow and connections between neurons to die.

"Even with a mild trauma, we found we still have these ischemic blood vessels and, if blood flow is not returned to normal, synapses start to die," said Dr. Sergei Kirov, neuroscientist and Director of the Human Brain Lab at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University.

They also found that subsequent waves of depolarization when brain cells lose their normal positive and negative charge quickly and dramatically increase the losses.

Researchers hope the increased understanding of this secondary damage in the hours following an injury will point toward better therapy for the 1.7 million Americans annually experiencing traumatic brain injuries from falls, automobile accidents, sports, combat and the like. While strategies can minimize impact, no true neuroprotective drugs exist, likely because of inadequate understanding about how damage unfolds after the immediate impact.

Kirov is corresponding author of a study in the journal Brain describing the use of two-photon laser scanning microscopy to provide real-time viewing of submicroscopic neurons, their branches and more at the time of impact and in the following hours.

Scientists watched as astrocytes smaller cells that supply neurons with nutrients and help maintain normal electrical activity and blood flow in the vicinity of the injury swelled quickly and significantly. Each neuron is surrounded by several astrocytes that ballooned up about 25 percent, smothering the neurons and connective branches they once supported.

"We saw every branch, every small wire and how it gets cut," Kirov said. "We saw how it destroys networks. It really goes downhill. It's the first time we know of that someone has watched this type of minor injury play out over
'/>"/>

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University
Source:Eurekalert  

Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Stress hormones: Good or bad for posttraumatic stress disorder risk?
2. Traumatic mating may offer fitness benefits for female sea slugs
3. Estrogen hormone reveals protective ability after traumatic brain injury
4. Researchers discover workings of brains GPS system
5. How the bodys energy molecule transmits 3 types of taste to the brain
6. 1 region, 2 functions: Brain cells multitasking key to understanding overall brain function
7. Brain adds cells in puberty to navigate adult world
8. Adding to the list of disease-causing proteins in brain disorders
9. Rain Man-like brains mapped at UCSF
10. CETS offers new method to help simplify the study of brain pathologies
11. Brown unveils novel wireless brain sensor
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Even mild traumatic brain injuries can kill brain tissue
(Date:7/23/2014)... the world by 2050, according to one of the ... (IPCC), may be advantageous to the physiology and the ... forage plants such as Stylosanthes capitata Vogel , ... such as Brazil., The conclusion is from a study ... at the Ribeiro Preto Faculty of Philosophy, Sciences and ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... MA -- What do mollusks, starfish, and corals ... habitat, they are all calcifiersorganisms that use calcium ... and shells for stability and protection. , The ... published by the Marine Biological Laboratory, addresses the ... changes worldwide. , As atmospheric carbon dioxide rises, ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... MINNETONKA, Minn. , July 23, 2014 /PRNewswire/ ... technology company specializing in clinical study management systems, ... West , a proven life sciences industry executive ... named Chief Operating Officer (COO).  Clareece will be ... and sales growth, operational efficiency and quality product/service ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):An increase in temperature by 2050 may be advantageous to the growth of forage plants 2An increase in temperature by 2050 may be advantageous to the growth of forage plants 3An increase in temperature by 2050 may be advantageous to the growth of forage plants 4Calcification in changing oceans explored in special issue of The Biological Bulletin 2MedNet Appoints Clareece West As Chief Operating Officer 2
... Nanoparticles will soon be used as tiny shuttles to ... a more targeted way than was possible in the ... the nanoparticles in medicine, concerns have arisen about their ... nanoparticles and their toxicity rely on the ability of ...
... Mass. April 28, 2011 A project to use ... $100,000 grant from The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation today. ... of the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) ... aim is to develop a Microbial Fuel Cell-based charger that ...
... One of the most critical tasks that a dividing ... set of genetic information to each new daughter cell. Now, ... issue of the journal Cell , provides fascinating new ... segregation of human chromosomes during cell division. During ...
Cached Biology News: Inverting a standard experiment sometimes produces different results 2 Inverting a standard experiment sometimes produces different results 3Harvard's engineering school receives $100,000 Grand Challenges Explorations grant 2Harvard's engineering school receives $100,000 Grand Challenges Explorations grant 3New insight into chromosome segregation: Centromere-independent kinetochore assembly 2
(Date:7/23/2014)... July 23, 2014 a2z Inc. announces ... Mobile App, AACC Pathfinder, in its 2014 Annual ... annual meeting is planned for July 29-31, 2014 in ... to be to connect with global leaders in clinical ... and other areas of breaking science in laboratory medicine. ...
(Date:7/22/2014)... Web) July 21, 2014 (PRWEB) July 23, 2014 ... Biomaterials, at Rutgers University. , The goal ... ideas across the full spectrum of scientists working ... research and development topics that represent the most ... been programmed to:,     Provide faculty ...
(Date:7/22/2014)... and Technology (NIST) and California Institute of Technology ... atomic clock that is based on a chip-scale ... clock, featured on the cover of the inaugural ... is the first demonstration of all-optical control of ... frequencies to lower microwave frequencies. (Optical frequencies are ...
(Date:7/22/2014)... , July 22, 2014   BioTE ... therapy using natural, bio-identical hormone pellets, today announced ... MD to the company.   Dr. Rouzier is joining ... physician.      Dr. Rouzier was residency ... UCLA and is a board certified emergency physician ...
Breaking Biology Technology:AACC Enhances Attendee Experience at Its 2014 Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo with a2z-Powered ChirpE Photo Booth and Mobile App 2AACC Enhances Attendee Experience at Its 2014 Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo with a2z-Powered ChirpE Photo Booth and Mobile App 3The 2014 NJ Symposium on Biomaterials Science Earns Society for Biomaterials Endorsement 2'Comb on a chip' powers new NIST/Caltech atomic clock design 2Dr. Neal Rouzier Joins BioTE Medical 2Dr. Neal Rouzier Joins BioTE Medical 3
...  Signaling a further commitment to expand its business model in ... of the largest imaging and cardiac safety core labs ... the opening of an office in Tokyo, Japan under the ... "We are pleased to announce the creation of our new ...
... Wis., Jan. 16, 2012 PuraMed BioScience, Inc. (OTCBB:PMBS) ... Baacke, CPA, to the position of Chief Financial Officer. ... the Corporate Controller for PuraMed BioScience, Inc. gaining extensive ... came to PuraMed after holding a supervisory position at ...
... Regenesis Biomedical, Inc., a medical technology company that ... Scott Brooks has joined the company in the ... is responsible for helping scale the organization,s capabilities ... (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20120109/LA31405LOGO ) ...
Cached Biology Technology:CoreLab Partners Opens Office in Tokyo, Japan 2PuraMed BioScience, Inc. Appoints Sue A. Baacke, CPA, as CFO 2Scott Brooks Joins Regenesis Biomedical as Chief Operating Officer 2
Compound(s) tested through a broad panel of 38 ligand binding and enzyme assays targeting the Central Nervous System. Used to determine selectivity and potential CV/Renal liabilities of compounds....
... Human serum is obtained from normal human ... by a test for Human Immunodeficiency Virus ... Virus (Anti-HIV 1/2), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), ... (HbsAg) and Non-reactive by a screening test ...
Compound(s) screened through any number of client selected assays. Client also selects number of concentrations and replicates....
Values of steady state parameters for enzyme activities are determined....
Biology Products: