Navigation Links
Embryonic development protein active in cancer growth
Date:3/6/2012

A team of scientists at the University of California, San Diego Moores Cancer Center has identified a novel protein expressed by breast cancer cells but not normal adult tissues that could provide a new target for future anti-cancer drugs and treatments.

Led by Thomas J. Kipps, MD, PhD, Evelyn and Edwin Tasch Chair in Cancer Research and Interim Director of the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, the scientists found that the tumor cells of patients with breast cancer frequently express the Receptor-tyrosine-kinase-like Orphan Receptor 1, or ROR1. They found that silencing expression of ROR1 impaired the growth and survival of human breast cancer cells. The findings are published in the March 5 online issue of PLoS One.

ROR1 was first identified in the early 1990s and labeled an orphan receptor because its purpose was unknown. Subsequent work found that ROR1 is expressed at high levels during embryogenesis, during which time it plays an important role in regulating embryonic muscle and skeletal development. During fetal development, however, the expression of this protein is turned off. Normal cells and tissues in adults do not typically express ROR1.

Cancer cells, however, are a different matter.

"Cancer cells tend to acquire features of less differentiated cells," said Kipps, interim director of the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center and a professor of medicine in the UC San Diego School of Medicine. "They often can be found to have features of embryonic cells."

In recent years, Kipps and others have become increasingly interested in the role of ROR1 plays in the growth of cancer and whether the protein might provide new options for stopping development of the disease. In 2008, for example, Kipps and colleagues reported that patients with leukemia treated with whole-cell vaccines could generate antibodies that reacted with their leukemia cells and the leukemia cells of other patients, but not with normal cells. They identified that such antibodies could target ROR1, accounting for the specificity of these antibodies in reacting with cancer cells. They identified another protein that could interact with ROR1 to stimulate the growth and/or survival of leukemia cells and that antibodies generated against ROR1 could block this function.

The discovery that ROR1 functions similarly in breast cancer heightens hopes. When the protein was silenced in human breast cancer cells, the cancer cells had slower rates of growth in the laboratory and in animal studies.

"There was a qualitative difference," said Kipps. "When ROR1 was knocked down, it took away some of the growth advantage enjoyed by cancer cells. Their capacity to survive also was impaired. This could affect the capacity of the cancer cells to survive treatment with other anti-cancer agents or generate tumors altogether."

The researchers report that expression levels of ROR1 correlate with the severity of at least some forms of breast cancer. The most aggressive cancers were the ones more likely to express ROR1. "That suggests ROR1 could be a good target for treating the most aggressive kinds of breast cancer, particularly the ones that lack expression of hormone receptors or the marker HER2/neu, which already can be targeted by monoclonal antibodies," Kipps said.

The discovery of ROR1's role in both blood and breast cancers also suggests it might have a similar function in other forms of cancer, a possibility Kipps said researchers will pursue.


'/>"/>

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. U-M human embryonic stem cell line placed on national registry
2. Metabolic defects in mice corrected with transplanted embryonic neurons
3. New roles emerge for non-coding RNAs in directing embryonic development
4. UCLA scientists complete first mapping of molecule found in human embryonic stem cells
5. Gladstone scientists identify genes involved in embryonic heart development
6. Improvements in embryonic preimplantation genetic screening techniques
7. Repulsion more important than cohesion in embryonic tissue separation
8. States now fund majority of human embryonic stem cell research
9. Research!America asks Congress to support embryonic stem cell research now
10. Congressman, CSHL president urge quick action to reverse judicial embryonic stem cell research ban
11. Ronin recruits protein allies to sustain embryonic stem cell growth
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Embryonic development protein active in cancer growth
(Date:2/2/2016)... Feb. 2, 2016 Technology Enhancements Accelerate Growth of ... of the digital and computed radiography markets in ... and Indonesia (TIM). It provides ... size, as well as regional market drivers and restraints. ... market penetration and market attractiveness, both for digital and ...
(Date:2/1/2016)... , Feb. 1, 2016  Today, the first ... (AHA) announced plans to develop a first of its ... power of IBM Watson. In the first application of ... IBM (NYSE: IBM ), and Welltok will create ... health assessments with cognitive analytics, delivered on Welltok,s health ...
(Date:1/25/2016)...   Unisys Corporation (NYSE: UIS ) today announced ... International Airport, New York City , to help ... to enter the United States using passports ... pilot testing of the system at Dulles last year. The ... during January 2016. --> pilot testing of the ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/3/2016)... WARRINGTON, Pa. , Feb. 3, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... biotechnology company focused on developing aerosolized KL4 surfactant ... Board of Directors has approved an inducement award ... Craig Fraser , its newly appointed President and ... the Board,s Compensation Committee on February 1, 2016 ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... COPENHAGEN, Denmark , Feb. 3, 2016 ... stage biotechnology company that applies its innovative TransCon technology ... to present at an upcoming investor conference.Event:2016 Leerink Partners ... York, NY Date:  , Wednesday, February 10, 2016 Time:  ... --> www.ascendispharma.com . --> An audio ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... BRUNSWICK, N.J. , Feb. 3, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ ... grants totaling more than $1 million for researchers ... are working on health-related research that demonstrates exciting ... this round of funding for the New Jersey ... for faculty members at these educational institutions— Princeton ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... ... February 03, 2016 , ... ProMIS ... potential targets (epitopes) specific to misfolded, propagating strains of Amyloid beta involved in ... antibody therapeutics for Alzheimer’s. , Following on from the first misfolded Amyloid beta ...
Breaking Biology Technology: