Navigation Links
Einstein to develop anti-HIV drug delivery system
Date:10/2/2009

October 2, 2009 (BRONX, NY) The National Institutes of Health has awarded Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University a four-year, $7.2 million grant to develop a microbicide-releasing vaginal ring to prevent HIV transmission.

"While condoms are excellent at preventing the transmission of HIV, it's often difficult for women to negotiate their use," says principal investigator Betsy C. Herold, M.D., professor of pediatrics, of microbiology & immunology, and of obstetrics & gynecology and women's health at Einstein. "It's imperative that women have alternative strategies available to protect their own health. Our belief is that an intravaginal ring that delivers a combination of drugs is the best strategy."

Vaginal rings are soft, plastic, doughnut-shaped devices designed to provide controlled release of drugs to the vagina over extended periods. At present, there are several models available for delivering contraceptives, but none for microbicides.

Dr. Herold and her colleagues will evaluate several anti-HIV microbicides, ultimately aiming for a two-drug combination. "Over the last decade, we've learned that when you expose HIV to a single drug, you make it easier to select for resistance," she says. "So, we are trying to target HIV infection at two different steps very early in its life cycle, which should prevent the establishment of any infection."

One of the drugs to be evaluated is tenofovir, which blocks reverse transcriptase, an enzyme crucial to HIV reproduction. Tenofovir is used currently as an oral systemic therapy against HIV, but it has also shown promise as a topical microbicide. The team will also test the efficacy of two so-called fusion inhibitors, including maraviroc and PIE12-trimer, which block the virus from entering target immune cells by different mechanisms.

The team will pay particular attention to choosing microbicides that preserve natural vaginal defenses against HIV. In recent years, supposedly safe microbicides were found to make women more susceptible to HIV infection. As Dr. Herold demonstrated in an earlier study, (http://www.einstein.yu.edu/home/news.asp?id=381) these microbicides most likely failed because they disrupted the vagina's epithelial lining, which provides a protective barrier against infection.

"We want to preserve that protective barrier while adding drugs that will be at the right place at the right time when the virus presents," says Dr. Herold. "That is why a ring, which can provide sustained delivery of the microbicide over three to four weeks, would be ideal. People wouldn't have to remember to use it, which is a problem with gels and pills. Also, we don't know if oral medications will get to the right place some drugs get into the genital tract well, but some don't." The ring could be replaced monthly without a doctor's supervision.

The microbicides will be incorporated into vaginal ring under development at the University of Utah, Department of Bioengineering, which is collaborating on the study.

"We've deliberately chosen to focus on drugs that have already been approved for systemic use or are far along in the regulatory process. This should shorten the time it takes to begin clinical trials. We know that every day that goes by, more people are getting infected with HIV," says Dr. Herold. The researchers hope to start Phase I clinical testing within the next four years.

The need for a microbicide-releasing vaginal ring is especially urgent in sub-Saharan Africa, where the infection rate among 15 to 49 year-olds exceeds 23 percent in some countries. AIDS is the leading cause of death in sub-Saharan Africa and women account for six out of ten of those living with HIV. "But this is not just a global health problem," says Dr. Herold. "This is a problem here in the U.S. The rates of HIV in certain regions in this country parallel the rates in many areas of developing world."

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the national infection rate in the United States is 1 percent; in D.C., it is 3 percent, and in the Bronx, 1.7 percent. While men still have higher rates of infection than women in the U.S., AIDS is a common killer for women ranking third after cancer and heart disease. As of 2007, there were 9,000 women with HIV/AIDS living in the Bronx.


'/>"/>

Contact: Deirdre Branley
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Einstein scientists move closer to a safer anthrax vaccine
2. Einstein researchers devise a fast and sensitive way to detect ricin
3. NIH funds research center for womens reproductive health at Einstein
4. Einstein and Pitt researchers develop new TB test that will dramatically cut diagnosis time
5. Empire State Stem Cell Board awards $12.7 million to Albert Einstein College of Medicine
6. Einstein scientists receive $10 million NIH grant
7. Einstein researchers develop technique to count messages made by single genes
8. Einstein researchers develop a new way to study how breast cancer spreads
9. In scientific first, Einstein researchers correct decline in organ function associated with old age
10. Feinstein researchers develop new genetic method and identify novel genes for schizophrenia
11. Einstein researchers receive grants totaling $700,000 for innovative breast cancer research
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Einstein to develop anti-HIV drug delivery system
(Date:1/28/2016)... JOSE, Calif., Jan. 28, 2016 Synaptics (NASDAQ: SYNA ... results for its second quarter ended December 31, 2015. ... second quarter of fiscal 2016 increased 2 percent compared to the ... second quarter of fiscal 2016 was $35.0 million, or $0.93 per ... Non-GAAP net income for the first quarter of fiscal 2016 grew ...
(Date:1/25/2016)... , Jan. 25, 2016  Glencoe Software, the world-leading ... and publication industries, will provide the data management solution ... (NPSC). ... Phenotypic analysis measures the ... organisms, allowing comparisons between states such as health and ...
(Date:1/21/2016)... 21, 2016 --> ... market research report "Emotion Detection and Recognition Market by Technology ... (Facial Expression, Voice Recognition and Others), Services, Application ... to 2020", published by MarketsandMarkets, the global Emotion ... USD 22.65 Billion by 2020, at a CAGR ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... Feb.10, 2016 ASAE is introducing a hybrid ... Companies (AMC) the option of joining or renewing through ... determined by staff size, every employee in any size ... and reap all available member benefits.   ... organizational membership options will allow organizations of any size ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... Texas (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... centers across three states, announced today the promotion of two long-standing principal investigators ... Chief of Family Medicine, Clinical Research and Development. , Dr. Laurence Chu, a ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... now available on Microsoft Azure. On Azure, Arvados provides capabilities for managing and ... clear demand for Microsoft Azure from major institutions collecting and analyzing genomic data,” ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... LITTLE FALLS, N.J. , Feb. 9, 2016 ... ), a biotechnology company specializing in the development ... the health of damaged tissues and organs, recently ... milestones for the first quarter of 2016. ... Regenicin began the new 2015 fiscal year in ...
Breaking Biology Technology: