Navigation Links
Effects of maternal exercise on fetal breathing movements
Date:4/17/2009

NEW ORLEANS Exercise has many benefits for adults, teens, and youngsters. It is less clear what benefit, if any, exercise may have during fetal growth during gestation. Now that scientists have determined that, generally speaking, maternal exercise poses no significant risk to a fetus, studies are underway to examine the mother/fetus/exercise/health connection.

One important study is now complete. Entitled The Effects of Maternal Exercise on Fetal Breathing Movements, it was conducted by Stephanie Million and Linda E. May, Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences (KCUMB), Kansas City, MO; and Kathleen M. Gustafson, University of Kansas Medical Center (KUMC), Kansas City, KS. The researchers will discuss their findings at the 122nd Annual Meeting of the American Physiological Society (APS; www.the-aps.org/press), which is part of the Experimental Biology 2009 scientific conference. The meeting will be held April 18-22, 2009 in New Orleans.

Study and Background

The primary aim of the pilot project was to test the theory that maternal exercise imparts a cardiovascular benefit to the fetus. The secondary aim was to determine if exercise-exposed fetuses have increased breathing movements compared to non-exercise exposed fetuses. Fetal breathing movements are a marker of fetal well-being and reflect functional development of the respiratory system and central nervous system control.

The researchers used a non-invasive, dedicated fetal biomagnetometer to measure maternal and fetal magnetocardiograms (MCG) along with fetal movements (breathing, body movements, hiccups and non-nutritive suck). Unlike an ultrasound, which takes static measurements of anatomy, MCG records the physiology of the developing fetus.

The investigators looked at the results from pregnant women between 20 and 35 years of age. The mothers were classified as exercisers if they performed moderate intensity aerobic exercise at least 30 minutes three times per week (moderate to vigorous walking, stationary bicycling and running). Mothers in the control category did not partake of a regular exercise routine. The MCG was measured between 24-36 weeks gestational age.

Between 36-38 weeks gestational age, breathing movements were identified using specific criterion. Measures of fetal heart rate and autonomic control were analyzed during episodes of fetal breathing and non-breathing movements. Although there was no difference in the number of breathing episodes, differences were noted between the groups.

Results

The researchers found:

  • Fetal HR was significantly lower in the exercise group during both breathing and non-breathing movement periods.
  • Fetal short-term and overall heart rate variability were higher in the exercise group during breathing movements.
  • Three independent measures of vagal control were higher in the exercise-exposed fetuses during breathing movements.
  • During periods of fetal non-breathing, there were no significant differences in measures of vagal control between groups. There were no group or breathing period differences in sympathetic heart rate control.

Conclusion

According to Drs. May and Gustafson, "These findings suggest a potential benefit of maternal exercise on fetal development because of the link between fetal breathing movements and the developing autonomic nervous system." Their next step is to use exercise as a potential intervention to improve short and long term outcomes in children born to women at risk for gestational diabetes.


'/>"/>

Contact: Donna Krupa
dkrupa@the-aps.org
703-967-2751
American Physiological Society
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Effects of maternal exercise on fetal breathing movements
2. Frogs reveal clues about the effects of alcohol during development
3. Ecologists question effects of climate change on infectious diseases
4. Scientists find climate change to have paradoxical effects in coastal wetlands
5. Chantix side effects no worse with depression history
6. Stronger coastal winds due to climate change may have far-reaching effects
7. Ocean acidification could have broad effects on marine ecosystems
8. Climate change effects on imperiled Sierra frog examined
9. Study reveals effects of unconscious exposure to advertisements
10. UNC, Yale partner to study effects of cocaine use on mother-infant relationships
11. Effects of climate change vary greatly across plant families
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:11/15/2016)... , Nov 15, 2016 Research and Markets ... Forecast to 2021" report to their offering. ... ... 16.18 Billion by 2021 from USD 6.21 Billion in 2016, growing ... Growth of the bioinformatics market is driven by the growing ...
(Date:6/27/2016)... June 27, 2016 Research and Markets has ... 2016-2020" report to their offering. ... America to grow at a CAGR of 12.28% during ... based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. ... the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the ...
(Date:6/22/2016)... On Monday, the Department of Homeland Security ... solutions for the Biometric Exit Program. The Request for ... (CBP), explains that CBP intends to add biometrics to ... United States , in order to deter visa ... Logo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160622/382209LOGO ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/7/2016)... -- Neogen Corporation (NASDAQ: NEOG ) announced ... as its chief science officer — a new position ... Neogen effective Jan. 1. Kephart has served ... of Thermo Fisher Scientific, as well as animal health ... industry experience also includes the management of a team ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... -- The report "Acrylic Processing Aid Market by Polymer Type (PVC), Fabrication Process ... Global Forecast to 2026", published by MarketsandMarkets, the global market size was USD ... 2026, registering an of CAGR of 6.2% between 2016 and 2026. ... ... MarketsandMarkets Logo , ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... 7, 2016 Regen BioPharma Inc. (OTCQB: ... of Molecular Sciences a team of scientists in ... have demonstrated that expression of NR2F6 in patients with early ... NR2F6 in patient,s cervical cancer tissue as well as in ... "This is an interesting study and the first that I ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... Kara Dwyer Dodge grew up hearing stories of the ... fisherman in Scituate, Mass., found a sea turtle entangled in the lines of one of ... became a minor sensation because no one could remember ever seeing one so large so ...
Breaking Biology Technology: