Navigation Links
Early treatment of stomach infection may prevent cancer
Date:4/30/2008

PHILADELPHIA Based on research using a new mouse model of gastritis and stomach cancer, researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) say that prompt treatment of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections reverses damage to the lining of the stomach that can lead to cancer.

In the May 1 issue of Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, researchers say their study results should lay to rest any question about whether and when - antibiotic treatment of H. pylori can eliminate or reduce risk of developing gastric, or stomach cancer.

We concluded that H. pylori eradication prevented gastric cancer to the greatest extent when antibiotics were given at an early point of infection, but that eradication therapy given at a later time point also delayed the development of severe lesions that can lead to cancer, said the studys lead author, James G. Fox, D.V.M., professor and director of the Division of Comparative Medicine at MIT.

The findings are important, Fox says, because stomach cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and approximately half of the worlds population is infected with H. pylori. Although H. pylori infection is now recognized as the major cause of both peptic ulcers and gastric cancer, and has been classified as a group I carcinogen by the World Health Organization, physicians are not sure whom to screen and treat with costly antibiotics, aside from first degree relatives of gastric cancer patients and those with peptic ulcer disease, he adds.

Since it typically takes several decades for gastric cancer to develop in those who are susceptible which is estimated to be up to three percent of infected people researchers also do not know when to treat the infection for maximum benefit. Human studies that tested treatment in patients who had already developed tumors had mixed results, but one previous study showed that giving antibiotics before premalignant lesions develop was successful in preventing cancer, Fox says.

The current study examined the effects of treating and eliminating H. pylori at different stages of progression from gastritis, an inflammation of the mucous membrane layer of the stomach, to development of gastric cancer. To do this, Fox and colleagues from MIT and Columbia University developed transgenic INS-GAS mice that over-expressed gastrin, a hormone that controls secretion of gastric acid by the stomachs parietal cells.

If you lose these cells over time, they stop secreting gastric acid, and this is, in and of itself, a risk factor for development of cancer, but gastric acid also helps protect against commensal bacterial colonization of the stomach, Fox said.

With increasing age, parietal cells in INS-GAS mice stopped producing gastric acid and underwent precancerous changes. By 20 months of age, the mice spontaneously developed invasive gastric cancer. Infection by H. pylori and progression to gastric cancer was accelerated in these mice, researchers discovered.

Researchers then treated the mice with antibiotics and looked for cellular changes. They found that, at every stage of advancing infection, mice that were treated with antibiotics had less severe disease. . Treating mice that were eight weeks post-infection reduced risk of developing cancer to the same level seen in uninfected mice. But using antibiotics at 12 and 22 weeks post-infection did not reverse the damaging changes, such as inflammation and development of precancerous lesions, to the levels seen in uninfected mice.

Our mouse model mimics the progressive process we know occurs in development of human gastric cancer, Fox said. This shows early intervention provides the maximum benefit.

Of added benefit, Fox says, is the associated finding that antibiotic treatment also reduces the level of other bacterial species that have invaded the stomach. Gastric acid is a barrier to bacteria, and if there is no barrier, bacteria can move into the stomach from the lower bowel and colonize it, producing inflammation and progression to cancer, he said. . Findings in humans and mice now suggest that antibiotic treatment potentially changes gastric microbiota and may impact gastric carcinogenesis.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jeremy Moore
Jeremy.moore@aacr.org
267-646-0557
American Association for Cancer Research
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Early parents didnt stand for weighty kids
2. New chemotherapy combo produces side effects, but no extra efficacy, in early breast cancer patients
3. Early exposure to common weed killer impairs amphibian development
4. Texas A&M scientists say early Americans arrived earlier
5. UDs Bobev receives NSF Early Career Award for research on novel compounds of rare Earth metals
6. Fluorescent cells give early warning for eye disease
7. Early environment may be key to determining bird migration location
8. Bottom trawling impacts, clearly visible from space
9. Plant reflections may be key to early detection of treatment needs
10. Portable device quickly detects early Alzheimers
11. Early treatment stops epilepsy in its tracks
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/19/2016)... , UAE, April 20, 2016 ... implemented as a compact web-based "all-in-one" system solution for ... biometric fingerprint reader or the door interface with integration ... modern access control systems. The minimal dimensions of the ... readers into the building installations offer considerable freedom of ...
(Date:4/13/2016)... , April 13, 2016  IMPOWER physicians supporting Medicaid ... setting a new clinical standard in telehealth thanks to ... leveraging the higi platform, IMPOWER patients can routinely track ... and body mass index, and, when they opt in, ... convenient visit to a local retail location at no ...
(Date:3/23/2016)... , March 23, 2016 ... Interesse erhöhter Sicherheit Gesichts- und Stimmerkennung mit ... Inc. (NASDAQ: MESG ), ein ... dass das Unternehmen mit SpeechPro zusammenarbeitet, um ... der Finanzdienstleistungsbranche, wird die Möglichkeit angeboten, im ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... 2016 , ... Cambridge Semantics, the leading provider of Smart Data ... has been named to The Silicon Review’s “20 Fastest Growing Big Data Companies of ... serves the needs of end users facing some of the most complex data challenges ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... British Columbia , April 27, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... oder "NanoStruck") (CSE: NSK) (OTCPink: NSKQB) ( ... im Anschluss an ihre Pressemitteilung vom 13. August ... erhalten hat, ihre Finanzen um zusätzliche 200.000.000 Einheiten ... 4.000.000 Kanadische Dollar zu bringen. Davon wurden 157.900.000 ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... ... April 27, 2016 , ... PathSensors, Inc., a ... Board. Dr. Lamka will assist PathSensors in expanding the use of the company’s ... the CANARY® test platform for the detection of harmful pathogens, including a number ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... , April 27, 2016 MedDay, a ... today announces the appointment of Catherine Moukheibir as Chairman of ... previous Chairman, Jean Jacques Garaud , who contributed to ... is effective immediately. Catherine started her career in ... and London .  She held C-Suite ...
Breaking Biology Technology: