Navigation Links
Early abuse tied to more depression in children
Date:2/4/2010

Although children can be depressed for many reasons, new evidence suggests that there are physiological differences among depressed children based on their experiences of abuse before age 5. Early abuse may be especially damaging due to the very young age at which it occurs.

Those are the findings of a new study of low-income children that was conducted by researchers at the University of Minnesota and the University of Rochester, Mt. Hope Family Center. The study appears in the January/February 2010 issue of the journal Child Development.

Children who experience maltreatment, including physical, sexual, and emotional abuse or neglect, grow up with a lot of stress. Cortisol, termed the "stress hormone," helps the body regulate stress. But when stress is chronic and overloads the system, cortisol can soar to very high levels or plummet to lows, which in turn can harm development and health.

The researchers studied more than 500 low-income children ages 7 to 13, about half of whom had been abused and/or neglected, to find out whether abuse early in life and feelings of depression affected their levels of cortisol. High levels of depression were more frequent among children who were abused in the first five years of their lives than among maltreated children who weren't abused early in life or children who weren't maltreated at all.

More importantly, only children who were abused before age 5 and depressed had an atypical flattening of cortisol production during the day, whereas other children, whether they were depressed or not, showed an expected daily decline in cortisol from morning to afternoon. This finding means that the body's primary system for adapting to stress had become compromised among children who were depressed and abused early in life. The results suggest that there are different subtypes of depression, with atypical cortisol regulation occurring among children who were abused before age 5.

The authors suggest that early abuse may be more damaging to developing emotion and stress systems because it happens as the brain is rapidly developing and when children are more dependent on caregivers' protection. Moreover, because it's harder for very young children to discern the clues predicting an abusive attack, they may be chronically stressed and overly vigilant, even when they're not being abused.

"In the United States, more than 1.5 million children are abused and neglected every year, though it's estimated that the actual rates are substantially greater," according to Dante Cicchetti, McKnight Presidential Chair and professor of child development and psychiatry at the University of Minnesota, who led the study.

"The results of this study have significant implications for children in the child welfare population and underscore the importance of providing early preventive interventions to children who have been abused."


'/>"/>

Contact: Sarah Hutcheon
shutcheon@srcd.org
202-289-7905
Society for Research in Child Development
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Carnegie Mellons John Kitchin receives early career award
2. Pancreatic Cancer Action Network-AACR Pathway to Leadership Grant awarded to Johns Hopkins Early Career investigator
3. Early immune response needed for hit-and-hide cancer viruses
4. In early heart development, genes work in tandem
5. Scientists create early-warning system to defend rare Jersey cows from continental disease
6. NSAIDs: Take em early and often when competing? Think again
7. Study shows nearly 1/3 of human genome is involved in gingivitis
8. Study shows pine bark improves circulation, swelling and visual acuity in early diabetic retinopathy
9. UNH prof. receives nearly $500,000 to research environmentally significant plants
10. Picis ED PulseCheck Increases Security and Privacy Protection in Nearly 150 Hospitals Through the Use of DigitalPersona Biometrics
11. Early life on Earth may have developed more quickly than thought
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/17/2017)... , April 17, 2017 NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ: ... announces the filing of its 2016 Annual Report on Form 10-K ... Commission. ... 10-K is available in the Investor Relations section of the Company,s ... the SEC,s website at http://www.sec.gov . 2016 Year ...
(Date:4/13/2017)... PUNE, India , April 13, 2017 According ... Identity Proofing, Identity Authentication, Identity Analytics, Identity Administration, and Authorization), Service, Authentication ... by MarketsandMarkets™, the IAM Market is expected to grow from USD 14.30 ... Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 17.3%. ... ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... Apr. 11, 2017 Research and Markets has ... report to their offering. ... The global eye tracking market to grow at a CAGR of ... Eye Tracking Market 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an in-depth ... market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. The ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/20/2017)... Parsippany, NJ (PRWEB) , ... June 20, 2017 , ... ... OHAUS makes the transition from being a trusted supplier in the weighing industry, to ... including cell extractions, ELISA essays, enzyme reactions, immunoassays, hybridizations and more, allowing for ...
(Date:6/19/2017)... King of Prussia, PA (PRWEB) , ... June 19, 2017 , ... ... by life sciences companies for over 50 years. One of the biggest challenges faced ... environment. Joining the firm’s regulatory affairs services team is Kati Abraham , who ...
(Date:6/16/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 16, 2017 , ... CTNext ... Entrepreneur Innovation Awards (EIA), held at The LOFT at Chelsea Piers in Stamford. , ... ideas to a panel of judges for an opportunity to secure $10,000 awards to ...
(Date:6/15/2017)... ... June 15, 2017 , ... angelMD announced ... device startup. Dan Parsley, angelMD’s SVP of Corporate Development, served as the syndicate ... syndicate is part of Saranas’ recently announced $4 million Series B financing round. ...
Breaking Biology Technology: