Navigation Links
Dodds contributes to new national study on nitrogen water pollution
Date:12/20/2010

MANHATTAN, KAN. -- A Kansas State University professor is part of a national research team that discovered that streams and rivers produce three times more greenhouse gas emissions than estimated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Through his work on the Konza Prairie Biological Station and other local streams, Walter Dodds, university distinguished professor of biology, helped demonstrate that nitrous oxide emissions from rivers and streams make up at least 10 percent of human-caused nitrous oxide emissions -- three times greater than current estimates by the climate change panel.

"This research deals with two important issues," Dodds said. "First, nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas. Second, nitrous oxide also destroys ozone in the upper atmosphere, exposing us to more ultra violet radiation."

The research, "Nitrous oxide emission from denitrification in stream and river networks," appears in this week's Online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

For the article, researchers from 23 institutions -- including K-State -- measured nitrous oxide production in 72 streams that drain native, urban or agricultural lands. Nine of those streams were in the Manhattan area, with three at Konza.

The level of nitrous oxide in streams and rivers is related to human activities that can release nitrogen into the environment, such as sewage runoff or crop fertilization. When this nitrogen reaches rivers and streams, it undergoes denitrification, a microbial process that converts nitrogren to nitrous oxide gas, called N2O, and an inert gas called dinitrogen, or N2.

As a greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide has global warming potential that is 300-fold greater than carbon dioxide. In the past century, concentration of atmospheric nitrous oxide has increased 20 percent, making it a strong contributor to climate change and ozone destruction.

"We show that river networks play an important role in how human nitrogen additions for crops influence the global environment," Dodds said.

The findings can lead to more effective mitigation strategies, Dodds said. Researchers suggest that nitrous oxide emissions can be reduced from river networks by changing agricultural and urban land-use practices, such as better management practices for fertilizers. By decreasing nitrogen input to watersheds, the production of nitrous oxide also diminishes.


'/>"/>

Contact: Walter Dodds
wkdodds@k-state.edu
785-532-6998
Kansas State University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Scientists discover why a mothers high-fat diet contributes to obesity in her children
2. Deranged calcium signaling contributes to neurological disorder, UT Southwestern researchers find
3. New research shows high-quality protein in eggs contributes to power, strength and energy
4. IFAR contributes to study that finds genes that influence the start of menstruation
5. Scientists discover new genetic variation that contributes to diabetes
6. Texas A&M spring graduate contributes to mental retardation research published in Nature
7. Think saturated fat contributes to heart disease? Think again
8. Scientists discover molecular switch that contributes to cellular aging process
9. BIO-key(R) International To Exhibit at Oracle OpenWorld
10. Sentara begins international trial -- open at only 24 US locations
11. UW science photo takes second in national contest
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/22/2017)... March 21, 2017   Neurotechnology , a ... technologies, today announced the release of the ... provides improved facial recognition using up to 10 ... single computer. The new version uses deep neural-network-based ... and it utilizes a Graphing Processing Unit (GPU) ...
(Date:3/20/2017)... -- At this year,s CeBIT Chancellor Dr. Angela Merkel ... Chancellor came to the DERMALOG stand together with the Japanese Prime Minster ... country. At the largest German biometrics company the two government leaders could ... recognition as well as DERMALOGĀ“s multi-biometrics system.   ... ...
(Date:3/13/2017)... Future of security: Biometric Face Matching software  Continue ... ... to match face pictures against each other or against large databases. The recognition ... ... software for biometric Face Matching on the market. The speed is at 100 ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/24/2017)... Md. , March 24, 2017  Infectex Ltd., ... (MBVF), today announced positive results of a Phase 2b-3 ... therapy regimen in patients with multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (MDR-TB). ... scientists at Sequella, Inc. ( USA ) ... A total of 140 patients were enrolled in ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... , March 24, 2017 Agenus Inc. ... immune checkpoint antibodies and cancer vaccines, today announced participation ... 7 th  Annual William Blair and Maidstone Life Sciences ... Alexandria Center in New York, NY ... March 29 at 9:40 am: Robert B. ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... Mass. , March 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... partner to global in vitro diagnostics manufacturers ... of the industry,s first multiplexed Inherited ... disease testing by next-generation sequencing (NGS). The ... were developed with input from industry experts ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... YORK , March 23, 2017 ... ... of death, putting significant strain on health care systems, in ... cancer diagnoses rises, so too does the development of innovative ... minimum side effects. Among the many types of cancer treatments, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: