Navigation Links
Do plants perform best with family or strangers? Researchers consider social interactions
Date:11/9/2011

In the fight for survival, plants are capable of complex social behaviours and may exhibit altruism towards family members, but aggressively compete with strangers.

A growing body of work suggests plants recognize and respond to the presence and identity of their neighbours. But can plants cooperate with their relatives? While some studies have shown that siblings perform best -- suggesting altruism towards relatives -- other studies have shown that when less related plants grow together the group can actually outperform siblings. This implies the group benefits from its diversity by dividing precious resources effectively and competing less.

A team from McMaster University suggests plants can benefit from both altruism and biodiversity but when these processes occur at the same time, it is difficult to predict the outcome.

"The greatest challenge for understanding plant social interactions is we can't interpret plant behaviours as easily as we do those of animals," explains Susan Dudley, an associate professor in the Department of Biology at McMaster. "Though we have shown plants change traits in the presence of relatives, we need to determine if this is cooperation. Linking the plant behaviours with their benefits is challenging when multiple processes co-occur."

Dudley and a team of researchers disentangle the sometimes contradictory research in the latest edition of the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, describing how the identity and presence of neighbours affect many processes acting on plant populations.

The problem, she says, is that plant social interactions are treated as a black box, with researchers only looking at the output, or the fitness of the plant, in sibling competition. But they need to investigate the mechanisms inside the box -- by describing how traits of individuals affect fitness -- to understand how the output is reached and which mechanisms are occurring to get there.

"Simply put, social environment matters to plants. If we first acknowledge that kin cooperation and resource partitioning are co-occurring, we can begin to address some very important questions," says Amanda File, a graduate student in the Department of Biology at McMaster.

"Among these questions is whether there is a link between kin recognition and plant performance, whether plant kin recognition can improve crop yield and how kin recognition shapes communities and ecosystems" says Guillermo Murphy, a graduate student in the Department of Biology at McMaster.


'/>"/>
Contact: Susan Dudley
sdudley@mcmaster.ca
McMaster University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Commercial aquatic plants offer cost-effective method for treating wastewater
2. UC Riverside biochemists devise method for bypassing aluminum toxicity effects in plants
3. Reproducing early and often is the key to rapid evolution in plants
4. MSU scientists find new gene that helps plants beat the heat
5. Researchers design artificial cells that could power medical implants
6. When under attack, plants can signal microbial friends for help
7. Current mass extinction spurs major study of which plants to save
8. Scientists unveil mechanism for up and down in plants
9. New hybrid plants could prompt more prodigious pepper production in Southwest
10. Extreme weather postpones the flowering time of plants
11. Even plants benefit from outsourcing
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/22/2017)... LIVERMORE, Calif. , March 21, 2017 ... recognition analytics company serving law enforcement agencies, announced today ... Sheridan as director of public safety business development. ... of diversified law enforcement experience, including a focus on ... Vigilant. In his most recent position, Mr. Sheridan served ...
(Date:3/13/2017)... Future of security: Biometric Face Matching software  Continue ... ... to match face pictures against each other or against large databases. The recognition ... ... software for biometric Face Matching on the market. The speed is at 100 ...
(Date:3/7/2017)... SALT LAKE CITY , March 7, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... solutions that help top global companies identify the best ... Leonard as Chief Sales Officer (CSO) and ... and Kucer,s appointments round out a seasoned executive team poised ... year and beyond, building on a year of record ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/22/2017)... LEXINGTON, Mass. , March 22, 2017   ... collections, today announced that Doctors Pathology Service ... mid-Atlantic region of the United States ... the Delaware Health Information Network (DHIN) to ... researchers. The novel program, announced in ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... , March 22, 2017 /PRNewswire/ - FACIT ... (the "Company" or "Propellon"), a start-up created by ... anti-cancer therapeutics. FACIT,s investment, combined with non-dilutive capital, ... program. The seed funding enables Propellon to accelerate ... the Company for financing and/or entering a strategic ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... ... executive recruitment firm, Slone Partners, is proud to have been named a Top 50 ... Scanlon Media is one of the most respected life science publications in the United ... , “It is a great honor for Slone Partners to be part of this ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... March 21, 2017 , ... Benchworks CEO Thad L. ... Forum on March 23-24 in San Diego. The event is a gathering of ... , Benchworks Vice President Christian Meyer will also participate in the forum. Participants ...
Breaking Biology Technology: