Navigation Links
Diversity in UK gardens aiding fight to save threatened bumblebees, study suggests
Date:3/19/2014

The global diversity of plants being cultivated by Britain's gardeners is playing a key role in the fight to save the nation's threatened bumblebees, new research has revealed.

Ecologists at Plymouth University, in a study published this week, have shown the most common species of bumblebee are not fussy about a plant's origin when searching for nectar and pollen among the nation's urban gardens.

But other species and, in particular, long-tongued bees do concentrate their feeding upon plants from the UK and Europe, for which they have developed a preference evolved over many millennia.

Dr Mick Hanley, Lecturer in Ecology at Plymouth University, said the study showed the continued importance of promoting diversity and encouraging gardeners to cast their net wide when choosing what to cultivate.

"Urban gardens are increasingly recognised for their potential to maintain or even enhance biodiversity," Dr Hanley said. "In particular, the presence of large densities and varieties of flowering plants supports a number of pollinating insects whose range and abundance has declined as a consequence of agricultural intensification and habitat loss. By growing a variety of plants from around the world, gardeners ensure that a range of food sources is available for many different pollinators. But until now we have had very little idea about how the origins of garden plants actually affect their use by our native pollinators."

The study, in the forthcoming April issue of the journal Annals of Botany (published by Oxford University Press), set out to examine whether bumblebees preferentially visited plants with which they share a common biogeographical heritage, with researchers conducting summer-long surveys along a typical residential street.

It showed that rather than discriminating between Palaearctic (a range extending across Europe, north Africa and northern Asia) and non-Palaearctic garden plants, bees simply visited plants in proportion to flower availability. Indeed, of the six most commonly visited garden plants, only one Foxglove was a British native and only three of Palaearctic origin.

Among individual species, however, there were distinct preferences, with the long-tongued 'garden bumblebee' (Bombus hortorum) showing a strong preference for 'native' Palaearctic-origin garden plants, choosing them for 78% of its flower visits. Meanwhile, the UK's most common species the 'buff-tailed bumblebee' (Bombus terrestris) favoured non-Palaearctic garden plants over species with which it shares a common evolutionary heritage.

Dr Hanley added: "As a general rule, bees will go wherever there are flowers available. However, if native plants were to disappear completely from our towns and cities, the long-term survival of some of our common pollinators like the 'garden bumblebee' could be in jeopardy. In addition to growing truly native plants like foxgloves, where possible, gardeners can help native pollinators by setting aside a small area to allow native brambles, vetches, dead nettles, and clovers to grow. But as long as some native species are available in nearby allotments, parks, or other green spaces, a combination of commonly-grown garden plants from all around the globe will help support our urban bumblebees for future generations."


'/>"/>

Contact: Alan Williams
44-175-258-8004
University of Plymouth
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Global survey of urban birds and plants find more diversity than expected
2. Excessive deer populations hurt native plant biodiversity
3. In grasslands remade by humans, animals may protect biodiversity
4. U of M-led study finds herbivores can offset loss of plant biodiversity in grassland
5. Birds of all feathers and global flu diversity
6. New orchid flora documents dramatic variety of orchids in a biodiversity hotspot
7. Perus Manu National Park sets new biodiversity record
8. Arctic biodiversity under serious threat from climate change according to new report
9. Cities support more native biodiversity than previously thought
10. Hacking the environment: bringing biodiversity hardware into the open
11. Biodiversity in production forests can be improved without large costs
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Diversity in UK gardens aiding fight to save threatened bumblebees, study suggests
(Date:6/9/2016)... , June 9, 2016 ... Police deploy Teleste,s video security solution to ensure the safety ... France during the major tournament Teleste, ... communications systems and services, announced today that its video security ... to back up public safety across the country. ...
(Date:6/3/2016)... LONDON , June 3, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... Transport Management) von Nepal ... ,Angebot und Lieferung hochsicherer geprägter Kennzeichen, einschließlich ... weltweit führend in der Produktion und Implementierung ... an der Ausschreibung im Januar teilgenommen, aber ...
(Date:6/2/2016)... , June 2, 2016   The Weather Company , ... Watson Ads, an industry-first capability in which consumers will be ... able to ask questions via voice or text and receive ... Marketers have long sought an advertising ... that can be personal, relevant and valuable; and can scale ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/5/2016)... , Dec. 5, 2016 /PRNewswire/ - Resverlogix Corp. ... the independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) ... high-risk cardiovascular disease (CVD) patients has completed a ... study should continue as planned without any modifications. ... that no safety or efficacy concerns were identified. ...
(Date:12/4/2016)... ... December 02, 2016 , ... A proposed five-year extension for ... funded research and development is welcome news for the photonics community, say leaders ... As part of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) compromise agreement finalized today ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... , Dec. 2, 2016 More than $4.3 million ... Helix Medals dinner ( DHMD ). The gala was held at ... New York City and honored Alan Alda ... respectively, to health and medicine and the public understanding of ... in 2006, the event has raised $40 million for the ...
(Date:12/2/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... December 01, 2016 , ... ACEA Biosciences, ... its Phase I/II clinical trials for AC0010 at the World Conference on Lung Cancer ... providing an update on the phase I/II clinical trials for AC0010 in patients with ...
Breaking Biology Technology: