Navigation Links
Discovery of the cell's water gate may lead to new cancer drugs

The flow of water into and out from the cell may play a crucial role in several types of cancer. Scientists at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have now found the gate that regulates the flow of water into yeast cells. The discovery, which will be published in the journal PLoS Biology, raises hopes of developing a drug that inhibits the spread and growth of tumours.

All living organisms must be able to regulate the flow of water into and out from cells, in order to maintain cell form and size. This regulation is carried out by special proteins known as "aquaporins". These act as water channels and control the flow of water into and out from the cell.

Involved in cancer diseases

Aquaporins are found in most organisms, and are believed to be involved in several diseases, including cancer. Research on mice has shown that inhibiting the function of aquaporins can dramatically reduce the spread and growth of tumours.

Important for research

It is therefore extremely important for cancer research to increase our knowledge of aquaporins. Scientists at the University of Gothenburg have recently achieved a minor breakthrough in the field. Karin Lindkvist at the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology and Richard Neutze at the Department of Chemistry, University of Gothenburg have determined the three-dimensional structure of the yeast aquaporin. The results will be published in the journal PLoS Biology.

Highest resolution

The structure has been determined using X-ray crystallography and is the highest resolution structure that has been determined for a membrane protein. The unique high resolution has enabled the scientists to answer one of the unsolved mysteries of biology. The aquaporins in yeast have long "tails", known as amino-terminal extensions. The function of these tails has, until now, been unknown.

"Our study shows that the amino-terminal extensions in yeast act as a gate that can be opened and closed depending on how much water the cell must release or absorb. Computer simulations and biological experiments suggest that the channel is regulated with a combination of mechanical regulation and phosphorylation", says Karin Lindkvist.

Similar to human

Yeast cells are similar to human cells in many respects, and Karin Lindkvist's research can have applications in cancer research and other fields.

"The structure of the yeast aquaporin that we have determined can be used to create inhibitors for human aquaporins, and this may in the long term lead to drugs that slow the growth of a cancer tumour", says Karin Lindkvist.


Contact: Krister Svahn
University of Gothenburg

Related biology news :

1. Discovery may help defang viruses
2. Stomach stem cell discovery could bring cancer insights
3. Symposium marks 30th anniversary of discovery of third domain of life
4. Emory paleontologist reports discovery of carnivorous dinosaur tracks in Australia
5. Natural product discovery by Cleveland medical researchers blocks tissue destruction
6. Researchers discovery may lead to hypertension treatment
7. Yale discovery suggests protein may play a role in severe asthma
8. Galapagos and Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics announce drug discovery collaboration
9. Profound immune system discovery opens door to halting destruction of lupus
10. Scripps Research discovery leads to broad potential applications in CovX-Pfizer deal
11. New discovery could reduce the health risk of high-fat foods
Post Your Comments:
Related Image:
Discovery of the cell's water gate may lead to new cancer drugs
(Date:4/28/2016)... -- First quarter 2016:   , Revenues ... first quarter of 2015 The gross margin was 49% ... and the operating margin was 40% (-13) Earnings per ... from operations was SEK 249.9 M (21.2) , Outlook ... 7,000-8,500 M. The operating margin for 2016 is estimated ...
(Date:4/15/2016)... CHICAGO , April 15, 2016  A ... companies make more accurate underwriting decisions in a ... offering timely, competitively priced and high-value life insurance ... health screenings. With Force Diagnostics, rapid ... and lifestyle data readings (blood pressure, weight, pulse, ...
(Date:3/31/2016)... 31, 2016   ... the "Company") LegacyXChange is excited to release ... soon to be launched online site for trading 100% ... ) will also provide potential shareholders a sense of ... to an industry that is notorious for fraud. The ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/24/2016)... NY (PRWEB) , ... June 24, 2016 , ... While ... machines such as the Cary 5000 and the 6000i models are higher end machines ... is the height of the spectrophotometer’s light beam from the bottom of the cuvette ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... 23, 2016 , ... Mosio, a leader in clinical research ... Recruitment and Retention Tips.” Partnering with experienced clinical research professionals, Mosio revisits the ... tools, and strategies for clinical researchers. , “The landscape of how patients receive ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016   Boston Biomedical , an industry ... to target cancer stemness pathways, announced that its ... Drug Designation from the U.S. Food and Drug ... including gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Napabucasin is an ... cancer stemness pathways by targeting STAT3, and is ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... A person commits a crime, and the detective ... the criminal down. An outbreak of foodborne illness ... (FDA) uses DNA evidence to track down the bacteria that ... It,s not. The FDA has increasingly used a complex, cutting-edge ... illnesses. Put as simply as possible, whole genome sequencing is ...
Breaking Biology Technology: