Navigation Links
Dietary calcium could possibly prevent the spread of breast cancer to bone
Date:10/2/2007

PHILADELPHIA A strong skeleton is less likely to be penetrated by metastasizing cancer cells, so a fortified glass of milk might be the way to block cancers spread, according to researchers at the ANZAC Research Institute in Concord, Australia. Using a mouse model of breast cancer metastasis, the researchers found that a calcium deficiency may increase the tendency of advanced breast cancer to target bone. Dietary calcium, they reason, might help prevent the spread of breast cancer to bone and serve as an adjuvant treatment during therapy.

Their findings are presented in the Oct. 1 issue of Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

According to the researchers, about 70 percent of patients who develop advanced breast cancer will have secondary tumors in the bone. The spread of cancer to bones leads to cellular processes that physically break down existing bone, leading to further pain and illness. In fact, the breakdown of bone and subsequent bone re-growth forms what senior author Colin R. Dunstan, Ph.D., terms a vicious cycle that turns bone into an environment conducive to cancer growth.

To better understand the role of bone turnover in the spread of cancer, Dunstan and his team compared the effects of a low- and high-calcium diet in mice. They found that dietary calcium deficiency independent of the chemical factors that control turnover was related to a significantly higher increase in cancer cell proliferation and the total proportion of bone that had been penetrated.

These results could have implications for patients with breast cancer bone metastases or who are at high risk for developing metastatic disease, Dunstan said. Many older women in our community are known to be calcium deficient due to low calcium dietary intake or due to vitamin D deficiency. These women could be at increased risk for the devastating effects of bone metastases.

According to Dunstan, his results call for further, directed clinical trials to investigate how calcium and vitamin D status influence progression to metastatic disease, and to determine if corrections of calcium and vitamin D deficiencies are important in breast cancer patients.


'/>"/>

Contact: Greg Lester
greg.lester@aacr.org
267-646-0554
American Association for Cancer Research
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Eat less, weigh more? Enzyme makes lean mice susceptible to dietary fat
2. ASU research shows connection between testosterone, dietary antioxidants and bird coloration
3. Major WHO study concludes calcium supplements can reduce complications during pregnancy
4. Protein discovery could unlock the secret to better TB treatment
5. Tiny particles could solve billion-dollar problem
6. Novel Therapy Tested in Mice Could Chase Away Cat Allergies
7. Spider Venom Could Yield Eco-Friendly Insecticides
8. First atlas of key brain genes could speed research on cancer, neurological diseases
9. Discovery of key proteins shape could lead to improved bacterial pneumonia vaccine
10. A comprehensive response to HIV could prevent 10 million AIDS deaths in Africa by 2020
11. New Breast Cancer Test Could Save Lives
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/24/2017)... 24, 2017 Janice Kephart , ... Identity Strategy Partners, LLP (IdSP) , today issues ... President Trump,s March 6, 2017 Executive Order: ... vetting can be instilled with greater confidence, enabling ... all refugee applications are suspended by until at ...
(Date:4/17/2017)... , April 17, 2017 NXT-ID, Inc. ... company, announces the filing of its 2016 Annual Report on Form ... Exchange Commission. ... Form 10-K is available in the Investor Relations section of the ... on the SEC,s website at http://www.sec.gov . 2016 ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... April 11, 2017 Crossmatch®, a globally-recognized ... solutions, today announced that it has been awarded ... Projects Activity (IARPA) to develop next-generation Presentation Attack ... "Innovation has been a driving force within ... will allow us to innovate and develop new ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... -- VMS BioMarketing, a leading provider of patient support solutions, has ... (CNE) network, which will launch this week. The VMS CNEs ... professionals to enhance the patient care experience by delivering peer-to-peer ... care professionals to help women who have been diagnosed and ... ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... SAN DIEGO, CALIF. (PRWEB) , ... October 10, 2017 , ... ... website as part of its corporate rebranding initiative announced today. The bold new ... broaden its reach, as the company moves into a significant growth period. , It ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... 10, 2017 SomaGenics announced the receipt of ... develop RealSeq®-SC (Single Cell), expected to be the first ... (including microRNAs) from single cells using NGS methods. The ... to accelerate development of approaches to analyze the heterogeneity ... "New techniques for measuring levels of mRNAs in individual ...
(Date:10/9/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 09, 2017 , ... At its ... Dr. Christopher Stubbs, a professor in Harvard University’s Departments of Physics and Astronomy, has ... was a member of the winning team for the 2015 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental ...
Breaking Biology Technology: