Navigation Links
Diet and lifestyle critical to recovery, says study

Diet and lifestyle may play a much more significant role in a persons ability to respond favourably to certain drugs, including some cancer therapies, than previously understood, say scientists.

Writing in Nature Genetics, University of Manchester researchers have shown how the nutrients in the environment are critical to the fitness of cells that carry genetic mutations caused by diseases.

The findings for the first time provide a scientific insight into why some people might respond better to certain medications than others and form the foundations for more individualised drug therapy in the future.

The team used bakers yeast a model organism studied by biologists to reveal molecular processes in higher organisms to explore the relationship between environment and genetic background.

The large-scale study involved removing one of the two copies of all yeast genes similar to removing one parents set of genes in a human and analysing the resulting fitness under different dietary restrictions.

If the gene targeted is quantitatively important, you would normally expect the yeast to show a reduction in fitness, said Dr Daniela Delneri, who carried out the research in the Universitys Faculty of Life Sciences.

But what we found was that in certain environmental conditions, removing one copy of certain genes actually produced the opposite effect and surprisingly the yeast cells grew more quickly and were healthier.

The team further established that this effect was mainly occurring in genes involved in the proteasome the quality-control system within the cell that degrades unwanted proteins.

The proteasome is important as it maintains the equilibrium of the cell, said Dr Delneri. When this equilibrium is lost it can result in a number of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, Huntingdons, Alzheimers and Parkinsons.

For example, in rapidly-growing cancerous cells the high proteasome ac

Contact: Aeron Haworth
University of Manchester

Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. SAGEs American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine looks at the health benefit of oats
2. Critically endangered Amur leopard captured
3. First-ever study: lack of critical lubricant causes wear in joints
4. Rutgers scientists research reveals critical knowledge about the nervous system
5. Critically endangered porpoise is focus of new research report
6. Childhood obesity indicates greater risk of school absenteeism, Penn study reveals
7. A study by the MUHC and McGill University opens a new door to understanding cancer
8. Study begins to reveal clues to the cause and progression of sepsis
9. Clones on task serve greater good, evolutionary study shows
10. New study warns limited carbon market puts 20 percent of tropical forest at risk
11. New study examines how rearing environment can alter navigation
Post Your Comments:
(Date:9/30/2015)... 30, 2015  The global glucose monitoring device and diabetes ... says a new report on the industry from Kalorama Information. Sales ... the market, followed by continuous glucose monitoring and sensor segment, ... market for these products in its latest report, The ... , ...
(Date:9/28/2015)... NEW YORK , Sept. 28, 2015 ... platform, announced today that its expedited traveler ...  CLEAR,s innovative platform transforms travel, bringing a ... for its members. "CLEAR offers ... which enhances customer service," said Jim ...
(Date:9/28/2015)... September 28, 2015 According to ... & Software), Product (Scanner & Others), Application (Access Control ... & Others) & Geography Global - Forecast to 2020", published ... reach USD 3627.90 Million by 2020, at a CAGR ... Browse 65 market data T ables and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
... tomato breeders and ketchup fans something to cheer about, ... colleagues at the Hebrew University in Israel have identified ... increase yield. The yield-boosting power of this gene, which ... of tomato, and crucially, across a range of environmental ...
... - A new minimally invasive surgery to correct a ... -- was demonstrated Friday at an international conference attended by ... Germany, Spain and Russia. Technically known as pectus carinatum, ... the patient,s chest the appearance of the breast of a ...
... how a new research program may shed light on how ... subject of a public event that will discuss the findings ... Influence on Human Evolution. Several members of the committee ... be carried out in the next 10 to 20 years ...
Cached Biology News:
(Date:10/9/2015)... San Francisco, CA (PRWEB) , ... October 09, 2015 , ... ... with a study that aims to better understand the relationship between weight management and ... more frequently and more accurately from participants using an iPhone app. , The uBiome ...
(Date:10/8/2015)... 2015   Intrexon Corporation (NYSE: XON ... appointment of Joseph L. Vaillancourt as Senior ... Nimrodi who continues in his role as Head ... to generate sustainable, biologically based solutions to environmental problems. ... held a variety of key roles including, Vice President ...
(Date:10/8/2015)... N.J. , Oct. 8, 2015  Genetic testing ... may aid the identification of more couples at risk ... a study presented today at the 2015 American Society ... October 10 in Baltimore, Maryland . ... Quest Diagnostics (NYSE: DGX ) are presenting at ...
(Date:10/8/2015)... WAYNE, Pa. , Oct. 8, 2015 ... firm, has announced the call for applications for the ... , majoring in a life sciences related field of ... In addition, the selected Clarkston Scholar will receive exposure ... Consulting and participation in Pennsylvania Bio events over the ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
... Madison, Wis. Paragon Development Systems (PDS) ... expand its presence in Madison into a new building. , ... Madison designs, builds and manages IT infrastructure and services ... vice president of IT infrastructure services, is responsible for restructuring ...
... and undergraduate degree were minted at the University of ... North American operations, the company said on Wednesday. He ... headquartered in Massachusetts, provides "enterprise service bus" technology to ... Wisconsin Department of Administraiton. , ,Though its definition is ...
... Madison, Wis. Massachusetts-based Genzyme Corp. said ... International , a University of Wisconsin-Madison biotech spinoff, for $600 ... company with annual revenues of more than $2 billion and ... the third quarter. , ,Both companies recently reported healthy quarterly ...
Cached Biology Technology:
Goat polyclonal to XAGE1 ( Abpromise for all tested applications). Antigen: Synthetic peptide: CGFGFRRQGEDNT, corresponding to C terminal amino acids 149-160 of Human XAGE1 Entrez Gene ID: 9...
Synaptotagmin, phosphoSer309...
... anti-phospho-PTEN (Ser385) ... amino acid region encompassing the ... (Ser385), Accession ... Quality Assurance: Routinely ...
Allophycocyanin (APC) anti-human CD193 (CCR3, CKR3) 25 tests...
Biology Products: