Navigation Links
Dead midges reveal living conditions of fish
Date:4/4/2011

Microscopic remains of dead Phantom midge larvae (Chaoborus spp.) may explain a few hundred years of history of the living conditions of fish, acidification and fish death in Swedish lakes. Researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have developed a method of using lake-bottom sediments to show when and how fish life disappeared from acidified lakes invaluable knowledge for lake restorations in acidified regions.

"It is actually just like a journey through time. Fish hardly leave any remains of their own when they die, but if we instead study the presence of organisms that are affected by fish, we can find clear traces. By studying mandibles (mouth parts) from Chaoborus larvae in lake sediments, we can recreate the history of the lake back to the early 19th century," says Fredrik Palm of the Department of Zoology at the University of Gothenburg.

Acidification of soil and water is one of the greatest environmental problems of modern times. A large proportion of Swedish lakes show clear signs of acidification, resulting in extensive fish death and severely reduced biodiversity.

Recent research has pointed to a clear correlation between fish death and the presence of Chaoborus larvae in lakes. Mandibles from Chaoborus larvae preserved in lake-bottom sediments can therefore be used to identify fish death and other fish changes in severely acidified lakes.

History in the rear-view mirror

The new method makes it possible to study the effects of acidification in lakes where no samples have previously been collected and where there are no historical data on fish community alterations. As it is also possible to determine the age of sediment samples, this method can additionaly reveal when different changes have occurred.

"By analysing Chaoborus mandibles that we recover in the bottom sediments we can tell how different fish communities have changed. Not only can we infer whether fish has disappeared, we can also see how different fish species have been affected. Roach, for example, are more sensitive to acidification than perch, and we have been able to show whether lakes historically have contained cyprinid fish or not. Remains of acid sensitive zooplankton can simultaneously be used to show trends of progressive acidification in lakes.

Providing a basis for restoration

As the method reveals how the fish community in a lake has changed over the last few centuries, it can also be used to turn the clock back as a way of deciding how biological restoration of an acidified lake should proceed. The historical perspective of the method also makes it possible to analyse natural variations in lake ecosystems.

Palm and his colleagues have therefore carried out their studies in the counties of Vstra Gtaland and Bohusln, Sweden, focusing in primarily on the Lake Grdssjn area in Ucklum, which has been a centre of Swedish acidification research for many decades.


'/>"/>

Contact: Fredrik Palm
fredrik.palm@zool.gu.se
46-317-863-668
University of Gothenburg
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Polarized light guides cholera-carrying midges that contaminate water supplies
2. Poop reveals an immigrant in Isle Royale wolves gene pool
3. Butterfly study reveals traits and genes associated with establishment of new populations
4. Structure of DNA repair complex reveals workings of powerful cell motor
5. Evolutionary winners and losers revealed in collaborative study
6. Method reveals new view of human nerve cells, opening door to potential drug targets
7. New study reveals aerosol plumes downwind of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill
8. A study reveals the keys to the locomotion of snails
9. Genetic analysis reveals history, evolution of an ancient delicacy -- morels
10. Research into chromosome replication reveals details of heredity dynamics
11. Combined molecular study techniques reveal more about DNA proteins
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Dead midges reveal living conditions of fish
(Date:3/22/2017)... March 21, 2017   Neurotechnology , a ... technologies, today announced the release of the ... provides improved facial recognition using up to 10 ... single computer. The new version uses deep neural-network-based ... and it utilizes a Graphing Processing Unit (GPU) ...
(Date:3/20/2017)... -- At this year,s CeBIT Chancellor Dr. Angela Merkel ... Chancellor came to the DERMALOG stand together with the Japanese Prime Minster ... country. At the largest German biometrics company the two government leaders could ... recognition as well as DERMALOGĀ“s multi-biometrics system.   ... ...
(Date:3/13/2017)... Future of security: Biometric Face Matching software  Continue ... ... to match face pictures against each other or against large databases. The recognition ... ... software for biometric Face Matching on the market. The speed is at 100 ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/24/2017)... Md. , March 24, 2017  Infectex Ltd., ... (MBVF), today announced positive results of a Phase 2b-3 ... therapy regimen in patients with multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (MDR-TB). ... scientists at Sequella, Inc. ( USA ) ... A total of 140 patients were enrolled in ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... , March 24, 2017 Agenus Inc. ... immune checkpoint antibodies and cancer vaccines, today announced participation ... 7 th  Annual William Blair and Maidstone Life Sciences ... Alexandria Center in New York, NY ... March 29 at 9:40 am: Robert B. ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... Mass. , March 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ ... partner to global in vitro diagnostics manufacturers ... of the industry,s first multiplexed Inherited ... disease testing by next-generation sequencing (NGS). The ... were developed with input from industry experts ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... YORK , March 23, 2017 ... ... of death, putting significant strain on health care systems, in ... cancer diagnoses rises, so too does the development of innovative ... minimum side effects. Among the many types of cancer treatments, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: