Navigation Links
Dartmouth researchers identify an important gene for a healthy, nutritious plant

Dartmouth researchers identify an important gene for a healthy, nutritious plant.

The research paper, published with colleagues from Colorado State University and the University of South Carolina, appeared in the early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science during the week of July 21.

"There's a lot of attention today on global food shortages," says Mary Lou Guerinot, the principal investigator on the study and one of the authors of the paper. "We've found a gene that is key for proper chloroplast function. This finding might some day help scientists develop plants that grow better and can serve as more nutritious food."

During photosynthesis, chloroplasts are the subcellular compartment used by plant cells to convert light energy to sugars, fueling the plant. This process in the chloroplasts requires iron, and up to 90 percent of the iron in leaf cells is located in chloroplasts. In this study, Guerinot and her colleagues provide molecular evidence that FRO7, a gene in the FRO family, is involved in chloroplast iron acquisition and is required for efficient photosynthesis. The FRO family is a group of proteins that transfers electrons from ferric iron (Fe3+) to reduce it to another kind of iron (Fe2+). This same lab showed that this process (reduction of iron) was essential for plants to take up iron into the roots from the soil in a study published in 1999 in Nature.

"We have now shown that an analogous process is required for proper chloroplast function," says Guerinot. "Moreover, without FRO7, plants sown in iron deficient soil died as young seedlings. Our findings are of particular interest because how iron gets into chloroplasts has not been well understood despite the significance of iron in chloroplasts."

Guerinot explains that one-third of the soil worldwide is iron deficient, so it is important to understand how plants acquire iron, allocate iron to different parts of the plant and within the cell, and survive under iron limiting conditions. This is not only critical to improve plant growth and crop yields but also to improve human nutrition. According to the World Health Organization, iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional disorder in the world today and most people get their iron from eating plants.

"Enriching crops with mineral and vitamin nutrients will provide sustainable solutions to malnutrition," she says.


Contact: Sue Knapp
Dartmouth College

Related biology news :

1. Dartmouth researchers discover gene signatures for scleroderma
2. Dartmouth researchers find the root of the evolutionary emergence of vertebrates
3. Dartmouth researchers alarmed by levels of mercury and arsenic in Chinese freshwater ecosystem
4. Dartmouth researchers show effects of low dose arsenic on development
5. Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researchers receive $10.8 million
6. UCSF researchers identify virus behind mysterious parrot disease
7. Researchers discover cells quality control mechanism
8. Researchers analyze how new anti-MRSA abtibiotics function
9. Researchers tap into a new and potentially better source of platelets for transfusion
10. CMV infections affect more than just patients with compromised immune systems, researchers find
11. A new cellular pathway linked to cancer is identified by NYU researchers
Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/27/2015)... , Oct. 27, 2015 Synaptics Inc. (NASDAQ: ... today announced that Google has adopted the Synaptics ® ... controller solutions to power its newest flagship smartphones, the ... Huawei. --> --> ... Google to provide strategic collaboration in the joint development ...
(Date:10/26/2015)... , Oct. 26, 2015  Delta ID Inc., a ... to mobile and PC devices, announced its ActiveIRIS® technology ... arrows NX F-02H launched by NTT DOCOMO, INC in ... is the second smartphone to include iris recognition technology, ... ARROWS NX F-04G in May 2015, world,s first smartphone ...
(Date:10/22/2015)... (NASDAQ: AWRE ), a leading supplier of biometrics software and ... 30, 2015.  --> --> ... decrease of 33% compared to $6.0 million in the same quarter ... $2.2 million, or $0.10 per diluted share, which compared to $2.6 ... year ago.  --> --> ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... ... The Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA), led by its Executive Council, has ... Prix, to represent the First–Person View (FPV) racing community. , FPV racing has exploded ... of racing and several new model aviation pilots have joined the community because of ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... Nov. 24, 2015  Tikcro Technologies Ltd. (OTCQB: TIKRF) today announced that ... 2015 at 11:00 a.m. Israel time, at the ... Yigal Allon Street, 36 th Floor, Tel Aviv, Israel ... Paneth and Izhak Tamir to the Board of Directors; ... external directors; , approval of an amendment to certain terms of ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... Switzerland (PRWEB) , ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... plant and the environment are paramount. Insertion points for in-line sensors can represent ... has developed the InTrac 781/784 series of retractable sensor housings , which ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... LAVAL, QC , Nov. 24, 2015 /CNW Telbec/ - ... the "Corporation") announced today that Mr. Pierre Laurin , ... a corporate presentation at the upcoming Piper Jaffray 27 th ... York Palace Hotel, on December 1-2, 2015. ... be available for one-on-one meetings throughout the day. The presentation ...
Breaking Biology Technology: