Navigation Links
Dartmouth research offers new control strategies for bipolar bark beetles
Date:1/25/2013

Population explosions of pine beetles, which have been decimating North American forests in recent decades, may be prevented by boosting competitor and predator beetle populations, a Dartmouth study suggests.

Bark beetles are the most destructive forest pests worldwide. Management and climate change have resulted in younger, denser forests that are even more susceptible to attack. Though intensively studied for decades, until now an understanding of bark beetle population dynamicsextreme ups and downshas remained elusive.

The Dartmouth-led study, published in the January issue of the journal Population Ecology, confirmed, for the first time, that the abundance of a certain animal speciesin this case the southern pine beetlefluctuates innately between extremes, with no middle ground.

"That is different from most species, such as deer, warblers and swallowtail butterflies, whose populations tend to be regular around some average abundance based on food, weather, and other external factors," says Matt Ayres, a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Dartmouth and senior author on the paper. "They don't appear and disappear in cycles. Rather, they exist in two stable equilibrium statesone of high abundance and the other of scarcity." Once the population pendulum swings toward the high end, it won't quickly or easily swing back.

The new research by Dartmouth scientists and their forester colleagues could provide the means to limit this seemingly bipolar dynamic, keeping the bark beetles at the lower stable population level.

The studies identify the presence of bark beetle competitors and predators (specifically two other beetles) as the predominant limiting factor that can keep the bark beetles at a low, stable equilibrium. The authors suggest that the presence of these competitors and predators could be encouraged as a control strategy.

"The pine beetles produce pheromones, chemical signals, that attract enough competitors and predators to prevent outbreaks," says Sharon Martinson, a member of the research team and first author on the new paper. "Leaving more dead trees in forests can provide habitat for competitor beetles that rarely kill tree, and for predators that eat both beetle species."

The authors suggest that other pest species with catastrophic impacts may also have natural dynamics that include a tipping point between the bipolar population states. By learning what factors control those tipping points, impacts on ecosystems can be averted through monitoring and occasional intervention strategies.


'/>"/>

Contact: John Cramer
John.D.Cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Dartmouth scientists track radioactive iodine from Japan nuclear reactor meltdown
2. Dartmouth researchers are learning how exercise affects the brain
3. Dartmouth research imparts momentum to mobile health
4. Science stars head to Dartmouth for the E.E. Just Symposium
5. Dartmouth research: The clocks are ticking and the climate is changing
6. Mercury releases contaminate ocean fish: Dartmouth-led effort publishes major findings
7. Study by UC Santa Barbara researchers suggests that bacteria communicate by touch
8. Research reveals first evidence of hunting by prehistoric Ohioans
9. Diabetes Research Institute develops oxygen-generating biomaterial
10. APS issues new policy requiring identification of sex or gender in reporting scientific research
11. UC Santa Barbara researchers discover genetic link between visual pathways of hydras and humans
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Dartmouth research offers new control strategies for bipolar bark beetles
(Date:12/6/2016)... , Dec. 6, 2016 Securus ... justice technology solutions for public safety, investigation, corrections ... jointly announced today a five (5) year funding ... agreement to expand the rehabilitation and reentry support ... PEP History Established in 2004, the Prison Entrepreneurship ...
(Date:11/30/2016)... CHICAGO , Nov. 30, 2016  higi ... a new partnership initiative targeting national brands, industry ... and reward their respective audiences for taking steps ... Since its inception in 2012, higi has built ... US, impacting over 38 million people who have ...
(Date:11/24/2016)... 23, 2016 Cercacor today introduced Ember TM ... trainers non-invasively measure hemoglobin, Oxygen Content, Oxygen ... Respiration Rate in approximately 30 seconds. Smaller than a ... immediate access to key data about their bodies to ... regimen. Hemoglobin carries oxygen to muscles. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/8/2016)... Dec. 8, 2016 Savannah River Remediation ... and selected NewTechBio,s NT-MAX Lake & Pond ... beneficial bacteria, in conjunction with Hexa Armor/ Rhombo ... with National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System requirements. ... a steady history of elevated pH levels, above ...
(Date:12/8/2016)...  Partnering to fuel Philadelphia,s ... Southeastern Pennsylvania (" Ben Franklin ... Independence Blue Cross; and Safeguard Scientifics ("Safeguard") (NYSE: ... $6 million funding initiative over a four year period ... to a burgeoning economic vitality in digital health, ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... San Diego (PRWEB) , ... December 07, 2016 ... ... safety data from its phase I/II dose escalation and expansion clinical trial for ... 2016 in Vienna, Austria. The purpose of the trial was to determine the ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... Huffman ... has become a Wonderware Certified System Integrator Partner. Huffman Engineering is the ... Software. , “The System Integrator Partner certification gives customers confidence that our engineers ...
Breaking Biology Technology: