Navigation Links
Could patients' own kidney cells cure kidney disease?

  • Patients' own kidney cells can be reprogrammed and used as therapy against kidney disease
  • Cells can easily be collected from the urine
  • 88,000 patients are waiting for a kidney transplant in the United States, and they wait for an average of 3 to 5 years

Washington, DC (July 27, 2011) Approximately 60 million people across the globe have chronic kidney disease, and many will need dialysis or a transplant. Breakthrough research published in the Journal of the American Society Nephrology (JASN) indicates that patients' own kidney cells can be gathered and reprogrammed. Reprogramming patients' kidney cells could mean that in the future, fewer patients with kidney disease would require complicated, expensive procedures that affect their quality of life.

In the first study, Sharon Ricardo, PhD (Monash University, in Clayton, Australia) and her colleagues took cells from an individual's kidney and coaxed them to become progenitor cells, allowing the immature cells to form any type in the kidney. Specifically, they inserted several key reprogramming genes into the renal cells that made them capable of forming other cells.

In a second study, Miguel Esteban, MD, PhD (Chinese Academy of Sciences, in Guangzhou, China) and his colleagues found that kidney cells collected from a patient's urine can also be reprogrammed in this way. Using cells from urine allows a technology easy to implement in a clinic setting. Even better, the urine cells could be frozen and later thawed before they were manipulated.

If researchers can expand the reprogrammed cellscalled induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)and return them to the patient, these IPSCs may restore the health and vitality of the kidneys. In addition to providing a potentially curative therapy for patients, the breakthroughs might also help investigators to study the causes of kidney disease and to screen new drugs that could be used to treat them.

In an accompanying editorial, Ian Rogers, PhD (Mount Sinai Hospital, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada) noted that "together, these two articles demonstrate the feasibility of using kidney cells as a source of iPSCs, and efficient production of adult iPSCs from urine means that cells can be collected at any time."

Just as exciting, the ease of collection and high frequency of reprogramming described in these articles may help improve future therapies in many other areas of medicine.


Contact: Adrienne Lea
American Society of Nephrology

Related biology news :

1. Strong El Niño could bring increased sea levels, storm surges to US East Coast
2. Penn vet researchers show lymphoma drug shrinks dog tumors, could lead to human treatment
3. New understanding of biomarkers could lead to earlier diagnosis of fatal diseases
4. New material could offer hope to those with no voice
5. Acidifying oceans could hit California mussels, a key species
6. PSA test for men could get a second life for breast cancer in women
7. Smelly socks could be a key to preventing malaria deaths in the developing world
8. University of Kentucky-led research could be path to new energy sources
9. Microalgae could be Texas next big cash crop
10. A mothers salt intake could be key to prenatal kidney development
11. New laser technology could kill viruses and improve DVDs
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/18/2015)... PHILADELPHIA , Nov. 18, 2015  As new ... in children, doctors and other healthcare providers face challenges ... counsel families and patients. In addition, as more children ... into a patient,s adulthood and old age. ... The Children,s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) . ...
(Date:11/17/2015)... Paris from 17 th until ... from 17 th until 19 th November ... has invented the first combined scanner in the world which scans ... Until now two different scanners were required: one for passports ... on the same surface. This innovation is an ideal solution ...
(Date:11/17/2015)... LIVERMORE, Calif. , Nov. 17, 2015  Vigilant ... has joined its Board of Directors. ... Vigilant,s Board after recently retiring from the partnership at ... owning 107 companies with over $140 Billion in revenue.  ... performance improvement across all the TPG companies, from 1997 ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/25/2015)... ... November 25, 2015 , ... Jessica Richman and Zachary ... in their initial angel funding process. Now, they are paying it forward to ... early stage investments in the microbiome space. In this, they join other ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... ... November 24, 2015 , ... The United States Golf Association (USGA) today announced ... Section Award. Presented annually since 1961, the USGA Green Section Award recognizes an individual’s ... , Clarke, of Iselin, N.J., is an extension specialist of turfgrass pathology ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... DIEGO , Nov. 24, 2015 Halozyme Therapeutics, Inc. ... Healthcare Conference in New York on Wednesday, ... Helen Torley , president and CEO, will provide a corporate ... New York at 1:00 p.m. ET/10:00 a.m. PT ... and investor relations, will provide a corporate overview. --> ...
(Date:11/24/2015)... Mass. (PRWEB) , ... November 24, 2015 , ... ... to maintain healthy metabolism. But unless it is bound to proteins, copper is ... of Health (NIH), researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) will conduct a systematic ...
Breaking Biology Technology: