Navigation Links
Continuing management needed for most threatened and endangered species
Date:9/9/2012

The Endangered Species Act (ESA)the key US law protecting species listed as threatened or endangeredfocuses on boosting species' numbers until they reach recovery thresholds and so can be taken off the ESA list. Almost 1400 species are now listed. Yet as many as 84 percent of currently listed species with management plans will face threats to their biological recovery even after they are considered "recovered" under the act, according to an article by Dale D. Goble and his colleagues in the October issue of BioScience. These species will require continuing management actions. Goble and colleagues argue that individual, formal conservation agreements are the best way to help such "conservation-reliant species."

The ESA was intended to interact with state and local regulations to prevent extinction. However, say Goble and his coauthors, these regulations are often insufficient to maintain a species' population, and the ESA itself may hinder the spread of a speciesfor example, a landowner may not wish to create habitat for a species that will then require monitoring under the ESA. Individual conservation agreements might not only help species' biological recovery and accelerate their removal from the ESA list, Goble and his colleagues maintainthey might prevent some species from having to be listed in the first place. To be effective, such agreements should be tailored to the species, landscape, landowners, conservation managers, and sources of funding of each situation.

Recognizing that conservation reliance is a deeper and more widespread problem for ESA-listed species than initially thought, Goble and his colleagues distinguish two forms of conservation reliancepopulation-management reliance and the less direct, threat-management reliance. The former will involve interventions aimed at helping specific populations. The latter is suitable for species that can persist if threats are managed so that an appropriate habitat is maintained.

Both sorts are illustrated in articles in the October BioScience. Goble's article is part of a special section that includes three case studies of specific conservation-reliant species. Carol I. Bocetti and her colleagues discuss conservation management agreements that will ensure continued availability of habitat for Kirtland's warbler. J. Michael Reed and his coauthors assess the status of Hawaii's endangered birds and how continued management is needed to maintain the populations of these species. Finally, the plight of the Mojave desert tortoise and its continuing management needs are addressed by Roy C. Averill-Murray and his colleagues.


'/>"/>
Contact: Tim Beardsley
tbeardsley@aibs.org
703-674-2500 x326
American Institute of Biological Sciences
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Latest Southern Ocean research shows continuing deep ocean change
2. Turf study to monitor runoff, establish fertilizer management practices
3. More than 70% of electronic waste management is uncontrolled
4. Entomologists to discuss threat and management of wide range of insect pests
5. University of Tennessee professor releases weight management product
6. NYU College of Nursings Dr. Anastasi awarded $2.5 million from NIH to study IBS symptom management
7. $3.2 million to develop battery management system for electric-car batteries
8. Active forest management to reduce fire could help protect northern spotted owl
9. New HealthFocus® International Study Reveals Five Very Different Weight Management Consumers
10. Validity CTO to Present Natural ID Solutions for Improving Mobile Risk Management and User Experience at NFC Solutions Summit 2012
11. Higher pain tolerance in athletes may hold clues for pain management
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:1/20/2016)... , Jan. 20, 2016 A market ... to directly benefit from the explosion in genomics knowledge. ... Howe Sound Research. A range of dynamic trends are ... - personalized medicine - pharmacogenomics - pathogen evolution ... with large markets - greater understanding of the role ...
(Date:1/15/2016)... 2016 Recent publicized breaches in cyber security ... ways to ensure data security and user authentication in ... Android that ties a user,s mobile number ... a hardware authorization token. Customer service agents who employ ... their KodeKey enabled device to verify their identity.  Companies ...
(Date:1/11/2016)... , Jan. 11, 2016  higi, the ... nearly 10,000 retail locations, web and mobile, today ... $40 million from existing investors. ... be devoted to further innovate higi,s health platform ... and web portal – including expanding services and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/9/2016)... -- Three-Year Initiative Supports Next Generation of Medical ... Life-Changing Camp Experiences ... the lives of children born with rare diseases, as well as ... is announcing a new initiative designed to positively affect the lives ... of rare disease care. --> To mark the company,s ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... 2016 DelveInsight,s, "Protein-Tyrosine ... provides in depth insights on the pipeline ... Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) Inhibitors. The DelveInsight,s ... stages of development including Discovery, Pre-clinical, IND, ... Preregistration. Report covers the product clinical trials ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... , Feb. 8, 2016 Should antibiotic bone ... cement products to prevent infection after standard total hip ... experts at ECRI Institute have been fielding a lot ... Fighting Your Bottom Line?" --> ... Line?" --> While there isn,t ...
(Date:2/8/2016)... , February 8, 2016 ... Oncology Private Limited, an innovation-driven oncology company developing ... and less toxic, today announced that chairman emeritus ... has invested in the company as part of ... round, joining existing investors Navam Capital and Aarin ...
Breaking Biology Technology: