Navigation Links
Conservation from space: Landscape diversity helps to conserve insects
Date:2/7/2010

Rugged, hilly landscapes with a range of different habitat types can help maintain more stable butterfly populations and thus aid their conservation, according to new findings published today (8 February 2010) in the journal Ecology Letters.

The research, carried out by scientists from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Butterfly Conservation and the University of York, has implications for how we might design landscapes better to help conserve species.

The scientists used UK Land Cover Map data (from satellite images) to collect information on the topography and diversity of habitats in the landscape. They found that sites with a greater diversity of habitat types (e.g. woodland, grassland, heathland) and more varied terrain tended to have butterfly populations that were more stable over time.

The study's lead author, Dr Tom Oliver from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, said, "More stable insect populations are better for conservation because it means that, in years with extreme weather (e.g. drought years), populations are less likely to go extinct. Our research shows that populations of species such as the Brown Argus and Dingy Skipper butterfly are more stable when they are located in hilly landscapes with a range of habitat types."

Thirty-five British butterfly species were included in the analysis using records collected by volunteers of the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme from 166 transect sites across the UK. The research team compared the stability of butterfly populations over an 11 year period with the diversity of habitats in the surrounding landscape up to 5km from monitored sites. They concluded that landscapes with a greater range of habitats harboured more stable butterfly populations. In addition, landscapes with a greater range of topographic aspect (e.g. north, south, east and west facing slopes) were also better for the insects.

Co-author Dr Jane Hill of the Department of Biology at the University of York said, "Our findings show that more diverse landscapes may provide a greater range of resources and microclimates, which can buffer insect populations from declines in difficult years."

A surprising result from the study was that, for some butterfly species, the diversity of habitats up to 5km away from monitored sites affected the butterfly populations. Co-author Dr Tom Brereton, Head of Monitoring at Butterfly Conservation, said, "Our results highlight the importance of taking a landscape perspective for species conservation."

The researchers hope that in the future it may be possible to design landscapes that are more effective at conserving species. Co-author Dr David Roy from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology said, "With a rapidly changing climate we need our landscapes to support biodiversity as well as provide other ecosystem services such as food production and clean water. Using remotely-sensed land cover data from satellites to design landscapes may help us to achieve the right balance."


'/>"/>

Contact: Barnaby Smith
bpgs@ceh.ac.uk
44-792-029-5384
Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Tropical insects go the distance to inform rainforest conservation
2. Springer will publish Journal of Coastal Conservation
3. Conservation International and Toyota partner to protect Philippines rain forests
4. Why conservation efforts often fail
5. The conservation lens
6. Soil, conservation experts to reflect on Hurricane Katrina disaster
7. The importance of mangrove conservation in tsunami prone regions
8. Great Ape Trust awards $127,000 for international conservation efforts
9. Wildlife Conservation Society study finds seasonal seas save corals with tough love
10. New study finds biodiversity conservation secures ecosystem services for people
11. Manomet Center awarded major NFWF grant to foster shorebird conservation
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/21/2016)... Massachusetts , March 22, 2016 ... facial recognition with passcodes for superior security   ... ), a leading provider of secure digital communications services, ... their biometric technology and offer enterprise customers, particularly those ... secure facial recognition and voice authentication within a mobile ...
(Date:3/17/2016)... ABI Research, the leader in transformative ... market will reach more than $30 billion by ... Consumer electronics, particularly smartphones, continue to boost the ... reach two billion shipments by 2021 at a ... Research Analyst at ABI Research. "Surveillance is also ...
(Date:3/15/2016)... -- Yissum Research Development Company of the Hebrew ... Hebrew University, announced today the formation of Neteera ... human biological indicators. Neteera Technologies has completed its first ... ... emissions from sweat ducts, enables reliable and speedy biometric ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... May 25, 2016 , ... Lajollacooks4u has become a rising hotspot for ... one of its top attractions. Fortune 500 companies, such as Illumina, Hewlett-Packard, Qualcomm ... and intimate team-building experience. , Each event kicks off with an olive oil and ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... May 25, 2016 , ... The American Medical ... Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) outlining a measurement approach ... data were available when and where it was needed. The organization of health ...
(Date:5/25/2016)... ... May 25, 2016 , ... Biohaven Pharmaceutical Holding ... has granted the company’s orphan drug designation request covering BHV-4157 for the treatment ... by the FDA. , Spinocerebellar ataxia is a rare, debilitating neurodegenerative disorder ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... , ... May 24, 2016 , ... ... newly re-branded identity. The new Media Cybernetics corporate branding reflects a results-driven revitalization ... imaging and image analysis. The re-branding components include a crisp, refreshed logo and ...
Breaking Biology Technology: