Navigation Links
Comeback of an abandoned antibiotic
Date:3/19/2014

This news release is available in German.

The common bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes is responsible not only for scarlet fever, a childhood disease presenting with characteristic skin rash, but also for many suppurative infections of the skin. The infection can be associated with serious consequences such as acute rheumatic fever and inflammation of the kidneys. In Germany, physicians usually prescribe penicillin, an antibiotic. In less-developed countries, penicillin is not always an option though. Firstly, penicillin is often not available and secondly, co-infections, i.e. concurrent infections, by another bacterium called Staphylococcus aureus occur and this microorganism is often no longer susceptible to the action of penicillin.

A group of scientists directed by Dr Patric Nitsche-Schmitz of the HZI entered into cooperation with the German National Reference Center for Streptococci in Aachen, Germany, to investigate if the antibiotic trimethoprim can be helpful in these scenarios. Trimethoprim inhibits an enzyme of folic acid metabolism called dihydrofolate reductase, which plays an important role in bacterial growth. Trimethoprim thus prevents bacteria from proliferating in the body. In the past, doctors advised against the use of this medication for treatment of streptococcal infections. The underlying reasoning was the wide-spread belief that the bacteria are already resistant to this agent, a misconception, as is becoming increasingly more evident. The reason for this mistake is that early studies used a culture medium that reduces the anti-microbial effect of trimethoprim.

The scientists from Braunschweig investigated samples from infected patients from Germany and India for resistance to trimethoprim. The majority of the samples were sensitive to the agent. "This shows that trimethoprim is indeed effective in many cases of Streptococcus pyogenes infection," Nitsche-Schmitz said.

The focus of his team was also on samples, in which the bacteria failed to respond to the agent. They discovered two types of resistance. "Spontaneous mutations can occur in the gene for dihydrofolate reductase rendering trimethoprim no longer able to attack the changed enzyme, which means it becomes ineffective," Nitsche-Schmitz explained. The team from Braunschweig detected a specific mutation in this gene in many samples, which renders streptococci resistant. In addition, bacteria can transfer copies of changed variants of the dihydrofolate reductase gene to other bacteria. This process called horizontal gene transfer allows resistance to spread very rapidly. The scientists found two genes of this type to be further causes of insensitivity.

The study shows that the antibiotic trimethoprim is a therapeutic option for Streptococcus pyogenes infections in some geographical regions of the world. The frequency of resistance is much lower than previously believed and the medication is inexpensive, stable and effective in Staphylococcus aureus co-infections. "However, it is like a sword that can loose its sharpness quickly," Nitsche-Schmitz said. "We found three causes for the rapid spread of resistance. It is important that trimethoprim, like all antibiotics, is not prescribed without need and that patients take the agent in accordance with the instructions given."


'/>"/>

Contact: Birgit Manno
presse@helmholtz-hzi.de
49-053-161-810
Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Crowdsourcing to kickstart comeback from ash dieback
2. University of Californias unofficial favorite sea slug poised to make a comeback
3. An extinct frog makes a comeback in Israel
4. Stanford scientists probe abandoned mine for clues about permanent CO2 sequestration
5. Researchers attempt to solve problems of antibiotic resistance and bee deaths in one
6. Exposure to antibiotics linked to severity of allergic asthma: UBC research
7. Team discovers how bacteria resist a Trojan horse antibiotic
8. New antibiotic could make food safer and cows healthier
9. Hot on the trail of metabolic diseases and resistance to antibiotics
10. University of Nevada, Reno first to show transgenerational effect of antibiotics
11. Bacteria discovery could lead to antibiotics alternatives
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Comeback of an abandoned antibiotic
(Date:6/1/2016)... June 1, 2016 Favorable Government ... Administration and Criminal Identification to Boost Global Biometrics System ... released TechSci Research report, " Global Biometrics Market ... Forecast and Opportunities, 2011 - 2021", the global biometrics ... 2021, on account of growing security concerns across various ...
(Date:5/12/2016)... 12, 2016 WearablesResearch.com , a brand ... overview results from the Q1 wave of its quarterly ... was consumers, receptivity to a program where they would ... health insurance company. "We were surprised to ... Michael LaColla , CEO of Troubadour Research, "primarily ...
(Date:4/28/2016)... -- First quarter 2016:   , Revenues ... first quarter of 2015 The gross margin was 49% ... and the operating margin was 40% (-13) Earnings per ... from operations was SEK 249.9 M (21.2) , Outlook ... 7,000-8,500 M. The operating margin for 2016 is estimated ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... the launch of the Supplyframe Design Lab . Located in Pasadena, Calif., ... the future of how hardware projects are designed, built and brought to market. ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... 2016 , ... In a new case report published today in STEM CELLS ... developed lymphedema after being treated for breast cancer benefitted from an injection of stem ... with this debilitating, frequent side effect of cancer treatment. , Lymphedema refers ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016  Blueprint Bio, a ... discoveries to the medical community, has closed its Series ... Matthew Nunez . "We have received a ... the capital we need to meet our current goals," ... provide us the runway to complete validation on the ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... YORK , June 23, 2016 ... trading session at 4,833.32, down 0.22%; the Dow Jones Industrial ... S&P 500 closed at 2,085.45, down 0.17%. Stock-Callers.com has initiated ... INFI ), Nektar Therapeutics (NASDAQ: NKTR ), ... Therapeutics Inc. (NASDAQ: BIND ). Learn more about ...
Breaking Biology Technology: