Navigation Links
Columbia University uses technological innovation to study bone structure
Date:1/15/2011

A team of researchers at Columbia Engineering and Columbia University Medical Center announced today the results of the first study comparing bone structure in Chinese-American women to Caucasian women. The report, just presented at the Orthopaedic Research Society's annual meeting at Long Beach, CA, found that pre-menopausal Chinese-American women have far greater bone strength than their Caucasian counterparts, as determined by a breakthrough technological advance.

The Columbia team was led by X. Edward Guo, Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Columbia University's School of Engineering and Applied Science, and, from Columbia University Medical Center, John P. Bilezikian, Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology, Marcella Walker, Assistant Professor of Medicine, and X. Sherry Liu, Associate Research Scientist.

The team used a groundbreaking analytical technique developed at Columbia Engineering Individual Trabeculae Segmentation (ITS) to analyze the microstructure and strength of the trabecular, or spongy bone, one of the two types of tissue that form bone (the other is cortical, or compact bone). Trabecular bone is the most important site of osteoporosis-related fractures. Critical to the research was the use of ITS, an advanced 3-D imaging analysis technique that was conceived and developed in Dr. Guo's Bone Bioengineering Laboratory, and has a unique ability using high-resolution computed tomography images to quantify the plate and rod microstructure crucial to bone strength and osteoporotic fracture of bone.

The Columbia group is the first to apply ITS to clinical studies; this is the first time they have applied ITS to ethnic studies of bone health. A total of 95 women were included in the study49 Caucasian and 46 Chinese-American. There were no significant age differences between the two groups (367 vs. 354).

"We found in this research that Chinese-American women do not have the same risk of fracture as Caucasian women due to the plate-like structure of their bone, which offers mechanical advantages over the rod-like structure found in the bones of Caucasian women," Dr. Guo explained. "If you look at a building made of walls, you can see that it is much stronger than a building made only of columns. Columbia Engineering's ITS is the only established technique that can distinguish plate vs. rod and it clearly revealed in this study the striking magnitude of the differences between the bone structure of the Chinese-American and Caucasian women."

Drs. Bilezikian and Marcella Walker led the clinical aspect of the study and quantified the microstructures in the distal radius and the tibia. "These are the two areas that the instrument can measure," Dr. Bilezikian said. "But we believe the data that come from these sites can be applied to other sites such as the hip."

Dr. Liu, who earned her PhD on ITS development in Dr. Guo's Bone Bioengineering Laboratory, noted that the most important factor when determining bone strength is the ratio of plate to rod in trabecular bone. "We found the plate to rod ratio of trabecular bone in Chinese-American women was twice that of Caucasian women (0.62 vs. 0.30). We also found the number of trabecular plates was significantly higher in Chinese-American women when compared to Caucasian women, indicating that Chinese-American women have much stronger trabecular bone than Caucasian women." Liu is currently an associate research scientist with Dr. Bilezikian in Columbia University Medical Center's Endocrinology Division.

Dr. Liu continued, "The size of the individual trabecular plates was significantly larger in the Chinese-American women versus the Caucasian women. Trabecular plates were 9% and 4% greater in thickness and 11% greater in surface area at the distal radius and tibia." The researchers also found that Chinese-American women had better cortical bone quality than Caucasian women. The study has not yet explored potential explanations for these differences.

"The advanced ITS morphological analysis developed at Columbia Engineering showcases a paradigm-shift technology in measuring bone micro-architecture," said Dr. Guo. "ITS is a must-have technology for both basic science and clinical studies of osteoporosis and we are very excited about continuing our research."

Drs. Guo and Bilezikian traveled to China this past November and are planning to return in early 2011 to work on creating Columbia-associated research centers there with the goal of extending their research to Chinese women living in both urban and rural areas of China. "The major differences between Chinese-American women and Caucasian women elucidated in this paper may eventually help us understand the mechanisms by which hormones and other factors control skeletal microstructure," Dr. Bilezikian said. "The essence of what we found here helps to account for the markedly reduced risk of a hip fracture in Chinese-American woman compared to Caucasian women."


'/>"/>

Contact: Holly Evarts
holly@engineering.columbia.edu
347-453-7408
Columbia University Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Columbia to award 2008 Horwitz Prize to Arthur Horwich & Ulrich Hartl for cellular protein folding
2. Similar survival rates for Pacific salmon in Fraser, Columbia Rivers raises new questions
3. Salmon smolt survival similar in Columbia and Fraser rivers
4. Columbia University scientist devises new way to more rapidly generate bone tissue
5. Columbia University Medical Center announces 2009 Katz Prizes in Cardiovascular Research
6. Columbia engineer part of team to receive $6.2 million DOD grant for blast research
7. Columbia University Medical Center announces 2010 Katz Prizes in cardiovascular research
8. Rice University establishes National Corrosion Center
9. Case Western Reserve University researchers track Chernobyl fallout
10. Case Western Reserve University project ties soil conservation and river management together
11. Brown University and Women & Infants Hospital expand national childrens study to Bristol County
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/7/2017)... , March 7, 2017   HireVue , ... top global companies identify the best talent, faster, today ... Chief Sales Officer (CSO) and Diana Kucer ... round out a seasoned executive team poised to drive continued ... building on a year of record bookings in 2017. ...
(Date:3/2/2017)... , March 2, 2017 Australian stem ... (ASX: CYP), has signed an agreement with the ... the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute and Department of Pharmacology ... conduct a further preclinical study to support the use ... of asthma.  Asthma is a chronic, ...
(Date:2/27/2017)... Feb. 27, 2017   Strategic Cyber Ventures , ... has led a $3.5 million investment in  Polarity , ... Cyber Ventures is DC based and is led by ... Thomas . Ron Gula , also a longtime ... participated in this series A round of funding. This ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/28/2017)... -- The National Pharmaceutical Council (NPC) today announced that Ipsen ... as its newest member. David Cox , PhD, ... America ), will serve as his company,s representative ... to have Ipsen and Dr. Cox join NPC as ... welcome their insights in helping us identify and address ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... ... March 28, 2017 , ... LabKey and collaborator Just Biotherapeutics, ... solution, LabKey Biologics . Built in collaboration with Just and designed with ... provides drug research teams tools for biological entity registration, assay data integration, and ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... , March 28, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -RepliCel Life Sciences Inc. (OTCQB: ... to report compelling safety and clinical data from its phase ... 1 collagen-expressing, hair follicle-derived fibroblasts (RCT-01) as a treatment for ... ... a complete safety profile at 6 months and showed no ...
(Date:3/27/2017)... ... March 27, 2017 , ... IsoPlexis Corporation ... cancer, autoimmune disease and more through a single-cell precision engineering platform, today announced ... platform developed in the laboratory of Dr. James Heath at the California ...
Breaking Biology Technology: