Navigation Links
Coho salmon: Pinks' and chums' eating cousin
Date:6/10/2014

Newly published research co-authored by scientists at Simon Fraser University and the Raincoast Conservation Foundation shows juvenile coho salmon benefit from dining on the distant remains of their spawning pink and chum cousins.

While juvenile coho salmon feed directly on spawning pink and chum salmon carcasses and eggs, even coho with no direct contact with spawning pink and chum benefit from their nutrient contributions to stream ecosystems.

The new research shows that juvenile coho abundance is up to three times higher in streams with abundant pink and chum compared to streams with none.

John Reynolds, an SFU biologist, and Michelle Nelson, one of his doctoral students, have just had their paper Time-delayed subsidies: Interspecies population effects in salmon published in PLOS ONE, an international peer-reviewed journal.

The authors say their discovery underscores the importance of understanding how a fish's nutrient legacy in streams and forest ecosystems affects species close and distant to them.

The paper's lead author Nelson says: ""We found an indirect link between spawning pink and chum salmon, and juveniles of another species, coho." The paper is one chapter of her thesis.

The carcasses of dead pink and chum salmon that have spawned in freshwater fertilize stream and forest ecosystems. The food web pathway may go from carcasses to algae to stream-insects and then to coho. Even more fascinating is a pathway that may go from carcasses to forest flies to coho.

"We know this isn't just because all three species benefit from being in nutrient-rich streams," says Reynolds, SFU's Tom Buell BC Leadership Chair in Salmon Conservation. "The habitat needs of pink, chum and coho are slightly different, and even taking habitats into account, the effects of coho dining on nutrients enriched by pink and chum remains are very clear."

"I hope this will highlight to fisheries decision-makers the ecological benefits of robust populations of spawning salmon," says Nelson. "Pink and chum salmon have less commercial and recreational value than coho. But their crucial contribution to stream ecosystems may benefit the health of coho populations."

Reynolds adds: "These findings are relevant to many people, considering the strong interest and connection many have with salmon. It also speaks directly to the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans' commitment to incorporate a better understanding of salmon-ecosystem interactions into fisheries management to conserve and restore salmon abundance in our region."


'/>"/>

Contact: Carol Thorbes
cthorbes@sfu.ca
778-782-3035
Simon Fraser University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Technology using microwave heating may impact electronics manufacture
2. Mechanism of cell death unraveled -- perspectives for treating inflammatory diseases
3. Marijuana shows potential in treating autoimmune disease
4. Eating prunes can help weight loss
5. A new approach to treating peanut and other food allergies
6. New species of metal-eating plant discovered in the Philippines
7. Grape skin extract may soon be answer to treating diabetes
8. Mouse study points to potentially powerful tool for treating damaged hearts
9. Eating rice boosts diet quality, reduces body weight and improves markers for health
10. Devil in disguise: A small coral-eating worm may mean big trouble for reefs
11. Two researchers known for identifying and treating bubble boy disease honored by March of Dimes
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Coho salmon: Pinks' and chums' eating cousin
(Date:3/18/2016)... 2016 --> --> ... Manned & Unmanned Vehicles, Physical infrastructure and Perimeter Surveillance & ... the border security market and the continuing migration crisis in ... Europe has led visiongain to publish this unique ... --> defence & security companies in the border ...
(Date:3/15/2016)... , March 15, 2016 Yissum ... , the technology-transfer company of the Hebrew University, announced ... of remote sensing technology of various human biological indicators. ... raising $2.0 million from private investors. ... based on the detection of electromagnetic emissions from sweat ...
(Date:3/11/2016)... 2016 http://www.apimages.com ) - --> ... available at AP Images ( http://www.apimages.com ) - ... to produce the new refugee identity cards. DERMALOG will be unveiling ... in Hanover next week.   --> ... used to produce the new refugee identity cards. DERMALOG will be ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/28/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... April 28, 2016 , ... ... Inc., will hold an open house for regional manufacturers at its Maple Grove, ... from Tsugami, Okuma, Hardinge Group, Chiron and Trumpf. Almost 20 leading suppliers ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... , April 27, 2016 ... (CSE: NSK) (OTCPink: NSKQB) ( Frankfurt ... an ihre Pressemitteilung vom 13. August 2015 die ... ihre Finanzen um zusätzliche 200.000.000 Einheiten auf 400.000.000 ... Dollar zu bringen. Davon wurden 157.900.000 Einheiten mit ...
(Date:4/27/2016)... Winnipeg, Manitoba (PRWEB) , ... April 27, 2016 ... ... commercially released for simultaneous preclinical PET (Positron Emission Tomography) and MRI (Magnetic Resonance ... for better understanding disease and testing novel treatments in small animal subjects. Simultaneous ...
(Date:4/26/2016)... ... April 27, 2016 , ... Cameron Cushman ... as an associate in the firm’s Intellectual Property practice group. , Clients turn ... patent applications. He has an electrical engineering and computer engineering background, and experience ...
Breaking Biology Technology: