Navigation Links
Cockroach brains could be rich stores of new antibiotics

Cockroaches could be more of a health benefit than a health hazard according to scientists from The University of Nottingham.

Experts from the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science have discovered powerful antibiotic properties in the brains of cockroaches and locusts which could lead to novel treatments for multi-drug resistant bacterial infections. They found that the tissues of the brain and nervous system of the insects were able to kill more than 90 per cent of MRSA and pathogenic Escherichia coli, without harming human cells.

Simon Lee, a postgraduate researcher will present/presented their work at the Society for General Microbiology's autumn meeting which is being held at The University of Nottingham between the 6 and 9 September 2010. The research has identified up to nine different molecules in the insect tissues that were toxic to bacteria.

Simon Lee said: "We hope that these molecules could eventually be developed into treatments for E. coli and MRSA infections that are increasingly resistant to current drugs. These new antibiotics could potentially provide alternatives to currently available drugs that may be effective but have serious and unwanted side effects."

Dr Naveed Khan, an Associate Professor of Molecular Microbiology who is supervising Simon Lee's work said: "Superbugs such as MRSA have developed resistance against the chemotherapeutic artillery that we throw at them. They have shown the ability to cause untreatable infections, and have become a major threat in our fight against bacterial diseases. Thus, there is a continuous need to find additional sources of novel antimicrobials to confront this menace."

Using state-of-the-art analytical tools, Dr Khan and his team are studying the specific properties of the antibacterial molecules. Research is currently underway to test the potency of these molecules against a variety of emerging superbugs such as Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas and Burkholderia.

Mr Lee explained why it is unsurprising that insects secrete their own antimicrobials. He said: "Insects often live in unsanitary and unhygienic environments where they encounter many different types of bacteria. It is therefore logical that they have developed ways of protecting themselves against micro-organisms."


Contact: Lindsay Brooke
University of Nottingham

Related biology news :

1. Introducing the good food guide for cockroaches
2. Cockroaches offer inspiration for running robots
3. IPM reduces cockroaches and allergens in schools
4. Insect brains are rich stores of new antibiotics
5. Caltech: Gain and loss in optimistic versus pessimistic brains
6. Tiny insect brains capable of huge feats
7. Parallel brainstem circuit discovery suggests new path in Parkinsons research
8. Brains, worms and computer chips have striking similarities
9. Psychopaths brains wired to seek rewards, no matter the consequences
10. Ladder-walking locusts show big brains arent always best
11. New neuroimaging analysis technique identifies impact of Alzheimers disease gene in healthy brains
Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/12/2015)...  Arxspan has entered into an agreement with ... use of its ArxLab cloud-based suite of biological ... will support the institute,s efforts to electronically manage ... internally and with external collaborators. The ArxLab suite ... Institute,s electronic laboratory notebook, compound and assay registration, ...
(Date:11/10/2015)... 2015  In this report, the biomarkers ... product, type, application, disease indication, and geography. ... are consumables, services, software. The type segments ... efficacy biomarkers, and validation biomarkers. The applications ... development, drug discovery and development, personalized medicine, ...
(Date:11/9/2015)... Calif. , Nov. 9, 2015  Synaptics Inc. ... interface solutions, today announced broader entry into the automotive ... solutions that match the pace of consumer electronics human ... biometric sensors are ideal for the automotive industry and ... Europe , ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/30/2015)... ... November 30, 2015 , ... Global Stem Cells Group announced the opening ... the cities of Arica and Iquique in northern Chile. The facilities are part of GSCG’s ... most advanced protocols and techniques in stem cell medicine to patients from around the world. ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... , Nov. 30, 2015 Harvard ... ), a biotechnology company developing bioengineered organ implants ... written notification from The NASDAQ Stock Market that ... price requirements. The letter noted that as a ... common stock having exceeded $1.00 per share for ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... DIEGO , Nov. 30, 2015 Human ... that the company has acquired Cypher Genomics, Inc., a ... robust human genomic interpretation software solutions. The ... will join HLI including Cypher CEO and Co-founder, Ashley ... of HLI,s Pediatric Business.  Financial details of the deal ...
(Date:11/30/2015)... and MAGDEBURG, Germany , November ... NeuroRehabilitation (ECNR) in Vienna, Austria ... European Congress of NeuroRehabilitation (ECNR) in Vienna, ... --> NovaVision, a wholly owned subsidiary of Vycor Medical, ... version of its Internet-delivered NovaVision Therapy Suite at the ...
Breaking Biology Technology: