Navigation Links
Climate change provides good growing conditions for charcoal rot in soybeans
Date:7/9/2014

URBANA, Ill. With over 100 diseases that can attack soybean crops, why would charcoal rot rise to the top of the most wanted list? University of Illinois scientists cite the earth's changing climate as one reason that more research is needed on the fungus that causes charcoal rot.

Fungi may often be associated with cool, damp growing conditions but Macrophomina phaseolina, the fungus that causes charcoal rot, prefers hot and dry drought conditions.

"As the climate continues to change and we see more extremes in the weather, including hotter, drier summers, this fungus will have more favorable conditions to gain a foothold in soybean and other crops," said Osman Radwan, a U of I molecular biologist. "If we look at diseases of soybean, we find that soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is at the top, but in the past decade or so, charcoal rot has become one of the top 10 diseases that affect soybean yield."

In examining previous studies on charcoal rot, Radwan and his team noticed that worsening weather conditions associated with climate change, such as higher heat and drought, brought an increase in the incidence of charcoal rot in soybean. He suggests that a research strategy be created to develop a high-yielding soybean that is both resistant to charcoal rot and drought tolerant.

"Right now we are screening lines of soybean to charcoal rot and drought stress, in collaboration with Glen Hartman, a USDA-ARS and U of I plant pathologist," Radwan said.

"His team is screening for charcoal rot resistance, and I am screening for drought tolerance," Radwan said. "Our ultimate goal is to identify the line that shows resistance to both charcoal rot and drought stress and in this way improve soybean tolerance to both the pathogen and the extreme weather conditions."

The review of research on the subject has been written along with Hartman and Schuyler Korban from U of I. Radwan said that this background for what's already been done on the topic will help them to develop a strategy for the next step.

Radwan emphasized that it's not just soybean crops at risk. The fungus causes charcoal rot in about 500 other host plants, including corn, sorghum, sunflower, and other important crops. This fungus also grows in high concentrations of salt, which isn't much of a problem to growers in the United States, but it is for farmers in developing countries where salinity is considered an issue. Consequently, the plant must be able to tolerate drought, salt, and resist this fungus at the same time.

One intriguing direction Radwan described that shows promise is that there may be interactions between M. phaseolina and other soil pathogens such as soybean cyst nematode (SCN) and sudden death syndrome (SDS).

"We have some assumptions about whether SCN can increase or decrease the incidence of charcoal rot as resistance to both pathogens might be controlled by two different pathways," Radwan said. He explained that biotrophic pathogens such as SCN need plant tissue to survive, but the fungus that causes charcoal rot is necrotrophic, meaning that it kills the plant tissue, then lives on the dead plant cells.

"We need to understand at the molecular level how these two pathogens interact when they are present in soybean fields. Understanding the mechanisms of molecular interactions between SCN and M. phaseolina will help molecular biologists and breeders to design an effective method to control both diseases and to breed soybean for resistance to both pathogens," he said.

Although no plants have complete immunity from the fungus, some soybean lines have been shown to have partial resistance to it. Hartman's group has already begun screening many lines in soybean for resistance to charcoal rot.

In controlled greenhouse conditions, Radwan grows a variety of soybean cultivars in sandy soil and then stops watering the plants to simulate drought. The susceptible ones wilt and, even after adding water, don't recover. Those that are tolerant to drought survive.

"If we screen for drought stress, we hope to find some cultivars that are charcoal rot resistant and others that are drought tolerant so that we can cross them," Radwan said. "Of course, they also must have good agronomic traits, such as having a high yield potential, in order to be acceptable to farmers."


'/>"/>

Contact: Debra Levey Larson
dlarson@illinois.edu
217-244-2880
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Shark teeth analysis provides detailed new look at Arctic climate change
2. Figuring out methanes role in the climate puzzle
3. For corals adapting to climate change, its survival of the fattest -- and most flexible
4. Study reveals strong links between Antarctic climate, food web
5. Fine-scale climate model projections predict malaria at local levels
6. Putting a price tag on the 2° climate target
7. Study: To address climate change, nothing substitutes for reducing CO2 emissions
8. Climate change and the ecology of fear
9. Capturing CO2 emissions needed to meet climate targets
10. A win-win-win solution for biofuel, climate, and biodiversity
11. New study quantifies the effects of climate change in Europe
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Climate change provides good growing conditions for charcoal rot in soybeans
(Date:1/4/2017)... -- For the thousands of attendees at this year,s International Consumer Electronics Show ... biometric measurement devices and services, will be featuring its new line of ... Medical,s special CES Exhibit Suite , the new upper arm and ... WellnessConnected product platform.  Continue ... ...
(Date:12/22/2016)... , Dec. 20, 2016  As part of its longstanding ... leading personal genetics company, recently released its latest children,s book, ... The book focuses on the topics of inheritance and variation ... Standards (NGSS) taught in elementary school classrooms in the US. ... series by illustrator Ariana Killoran , whose previous book ...
(Date:12/20/2016)... and GENEVA, Dec, 20, 2016   Valencell ... sensor technology, and STMicroelectronics (NYSE: STM), a ... of electronics applications, announced today the launch of ... for biometric wearables that includes ST,s compact ... Valencell,s Benchmark™ biometric sensor system. Together, SensorTile ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/17/2017)... ... January 17, 2017 , ... ... Drug Safety Technology Consortium™ (SafeTEC™), $3 million in investment towards 15+ TEC Validation ... tools and assays, and their applicability in drug safety assessment, for the industry ...
(Date:1/16/2017)... NY (PRWEB) , ... January 16, 2017 , ... ... New Jersey laws precedential publication its decision on the appeal filed by India-based ... lawsuit of breach of contract against DPCL and one of its Dishman Group’s ...
(Date:1/14/2017)... , Jan. 13, 2017  The Alliance for ... in response to FDA final guidance on ... its continued leadership in emphasizing the importance of distinct ... keenly aware of the benefits biosimilars will bring to ... Yet the portion of the Guidance dealing ...
(Date:1/13/2017)... Island, NY (PRWEB) , ... January 13, 2017 ... ... teamed up with several companies to offer its customers three new solutions for ... probe would come in handy if a customer has an oddly-shaped sample that ...
Breaking Biology Technology: