Navigation Links
Cleveland Clinic researchers discover process that turns 'good cholesterol' bad
Date:1/26/2014

Cleveland: Cleveland Clinic researchers have discovered the process by which high-density lipoprotein (HDL) the so-called "good cholesterol" becomes dysfunctional, loses its cardio-protective properties, and instead promotes inflammation and atherosclerosis, or the clogging and hardening of the arteries. Their research was published online today in the journal Nature Medicine.

The beneficial and cardio-protective properties of HDL have been studied and reported extensively, yet all clinical trials of pharmaceuticals designed to raise HDL levels have so far failed to show that they significantly improve cardiovascular health. This disconnect, as well as recent research showing that a protein abundant in HDL is present in an oxidized form in diseased artery walls, spurred the research team led by Stanley Hazen, M.D., Ph.D., Vice Chair of Translational Research for the Lerner Research Institute and section head of Preventive Cardiology & Rehabilitation in the Miller Family Heart and Vascular Institute at Cleveland Clinic to study the process by which HDL becomes dysfunctional.

Apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) is the primary protein present in HDL, providing the structure of the molecule that allows it to transfer cholesterol out of the artery wall and deliver it to the liver, from which cholesterol is excreted. It's apoA1 that normally gives HDL its cardio-protective qualities, but Dr. Hazen and his colleagues have discovered that in the artery wall during atherosclerosis, a large proportion of apoA1 becomes oxidized and no longer contributes to cardiovascular health, but rather, contributes to the development of coronary artery disease.

Over the course of more than five years, Dr. Hazen and his colleagues developed a method for identifying dysfunctional apoA1/HDL and discovered the process by which it is oxidized and turned dysfunctional in the artery wall. They then tested the blood of 627 Cleveland Clinic cardiology patients for the dysfunctional HDL and found that higher levels raised the patient's risk for cardiovascular disease.

"Identifying the structure of dysfunctional apoA1 and the process by which it becomes disease-promoting instead of disease-preventing is the first step in creating new tests and treatments for cardiovascular disease," said Dr. Hazen. "Now that we know what this dysfunctional protein looks like, we are developing a clinical test to measure its levels in the bloodstream, which will be a valuable tool for both assessing cardiovascular disease risk in patients and for guiding development of HDL-targeted therapies to prevent disease."

The research also points toward new therapeutic targets for pharmaceuticals, such as those designed to prevent the formation of dysfunctional HDL and the development or progression of atherosclerosis.


'/>"/>

Contact: Laura Ambro
ambrol@ccf.org
216-636-5876
Cleveland Clinic
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Cleveland Clinic identifies mechanism in Alzheimers-related memory loss
2. 2 Cleveland Clinic researchers honored for contribution to science
3. Cleveland Clinics 2013 Obesity Summit explores causes, prevention and treatment of obesity
4. Cleveland Clinic research shows gut bacteria byproduct predicts heart attack and stroke
5. Cleveland Clinic researchers discover new link between heart disease and red meat
6. Cleveland Clinic research shows anemia drug does not improve health of anemic heart failure patients
7. Cleveland Clinic develops clinical screening program for no.1 genetic cause of colon cancer
8. Cleveland Clinic researchers receive $5 million grant to discover novel pathways to heart disease
9. Complimentary press registration now open for ACMG 2014 Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting
10. Case Western Reserve wins $12.7 million for AIDS research and clinical trials
11. MedNet Solutions Announces Latest Release Of Its Innovative iMedNet EDC eClinical Solution
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:7/17/2019)... RAPID CITY, S.D. (PRWEB) , ... July 16, 2019 , ... ... begin to form, or to detect bone loss before it causes osteoporosis. For South ... reality. , “This is potentially a game-changer in terms of our ability to ...
(Date:7/10/2019)... ... July 10, 2019 , ... Inference ... and service organizations, today announced its role in Pizza Hut Australia’s digital ... of its franchisees. A key part of this initiative is implementation of an ...
(Date:7/9/2019)... CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (PRWEB) , ... July 08, 2019 ... ... of the company’s footprint in the biotechnology hub of Cambridge, MA. This expansion ... , primary market research , and sales force effectiveness consulting ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/31/2019)... ... ... For many years, the primary forms of cancer treatment have been chemotherapy, radiation and ... led to the advent of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T (CAR T) cell therapy, which ... The CAR enables the final product to produce chemicals in the hopes that the ...
(Date:5/31/2019)... ... 2019 , ... World Compliance Seminars today announced a live ... Boston, MA. This peer recommended interactive workshop is always selected by professionals at ... off with a compendial treatment of Data Integrity fundamentals. After laying the groundwork, ...
(Date:5/31/2019)... ... 2019 , ... A study released today in STEM CELLS ... sustained release of human placental stem cell (HPSC)-derived conditioned medium (CM) to treat ... into the injured kidney, where it helped restore function and regenerate injured tissue. ...
(Date:5/21/2019)... ... May 21, 2019 , ... DuPont Nutrition ... opened the inaugural Africa Brewing Conference dedicated to sharing brewing knowledge, strengthening relationships ... event, which is supported through a partnership with “Ethiopia Invest”, will run through ...
Breaking Biology Technology: