Navigation Links
Chinese medicine societies reject tiger bones ahead of CITES conference
Date:3/12/2010

Doha, Qatar WWF and TRAFFIC welcome a World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies (WFCMS) statement urging its members not to use tiger bone or any other parts from endangered wildlife.

The statement was made at a symposium Friday in Beijing and notes that some of the claimed medicinal benefits of tiger bone have no basis. The use of tiger bones was removed from the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) pharmacopeia in 1993, when China first introduced a domestic ban on tiger trade.

"Tiger conservation has become a political issue in the world. Therefore, it's necessary for the traditional Chinese medicine industry to support the conservation of endangered species, including tigers," said Huang Jianyin, deputy secretary of WFCMS.

Illegal trade in Asian big cat products is a key issue at the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) Conference of Parties meeting at Doha, Qatar. China is among the 175 countries that are signatories to this international treaty governing wildlife trade.

"CITES governments should be encouraged by this statement and use the opportunity they have at this meeting to pass measures, that if properly enforced, can help put an end to tiger trade," said Dr. Colman O'Criodain, Wildlife trade analyst, WWF International.

The statement also calls on all WFCMS' members to promote tiger conservation and encourages them to abide by all relevant international and national regulations on wildlife trade.

"The Societies' public declaration is a clear signal that the traditional Chinese medicinal community is now backing efforts to secure a future for wild tigers," said Professor Xu Hongfa, head of TRAFFIC's programme in China.

As an international traditional Chinese academic organization, the WFCMS stated that it had a duty to research the conservation of endangered species, including tigers.

"We will ask our members not to use endangered wildlife in traditional Chinese medicine, and reduce the misunderstanding and bias of the international community," said the WFCMS' Huang Jianyin. "The traditional Chinese medicine industry should look for substitutes and research on economical and effective substitutes for tiger products, which will improve the international image and status of traditional Chinese medicine and promote TCM in the world."

The WFCMS is an international academic organization based in Beijing, with 195 member organizations spanning 57 nations where traditional Chinese medicine is used. It aims to promote the development of traditional Chinese medicine, which is a primary form of healthcare delivery in China, and widely regarded as an important part of China's rich cultural heritage.

WWF and TRAFFIC are calling for a permanent ban on all trade in tiger parts and products, and for a curtailment of commercial captive breeding operations.

Wild tigers are especially in the spotlight as 2010 marks the celebration of the Year of the Tiger in the Chinese lunar calendar. This year is seen as a unique opportunity to galvanize international action to save this iconic species.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sarah Janicke
sjanicke@wwfint.org
41-795-288-641
World Wildlife Fund
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Scientists help explain effects of ancient Chinese herbal formulas on heart health
2. Reintroduced Chinese alligators now multiplying in the wild in China
3. Chinese slimming capsules
4. Male crickets with bigger heads are better fighters, study reveals, echoing ancient Chinese text
5. Study finds Chinese food good for your heart
6. Relocation of endangered Chinese turtle may save species
7. USP Convention and Chinese Pharmacopoeia Commission sign Memorandum of Understanding
8. 2008 Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation awarded to Fan Meng; first Chinese fellow
9. Dartmouth researchers alarmed by levels of mercury and arsenic in Chinese freshwater ecosystem
10. UC-Riverside partners with Chinese university to address Chinas environmental problems
11. Personalized medicine in warfarin therapy
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/19/2016)... -- The new GEZE SecuLogic access control ... system solution for all door components. It can be ... interface with integration authorization management system, and thus fulfills ... dimensions of the access control and the optimum integration ... considerable freedom of design with regard to the doors. ...
(Date:3/31/2016)... Florida , March 31, 2016 ... ) ("LegacyXChange" or the "Company") LegacyXChange ... potential users of its soon to be launched online ... ( https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyTLBzmZogV1y2D6bDkBX5g ) will also provide potential ... use of DNA technology to an industry that is ...
(Date:3/22/2016)... PROVO and SANDY, Utah ... (NSO), which operates the highest sample volume laboratory in ... Tute Genomics and UNIConnect, leaders in clinical sequencing informatics ... the launch of a project to establish the informatics ... NSO has been contracted by the ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/3/2016)... MA (PRWEB) , ... May 03, 2016 , ... ... that facilitates accessibility to unique bioresearch materials from laboratories across the globe, today ... researchers scramble to increase the pace of research toward treatment and prevention measures ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... , ... May 03, 2016 , ... ... fertility clinics and IVF laboratories. A contingency of reproductive endocrinologists, including Dr. ... and women experiencing infertility and to help them build families. , Ovation Fertility ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... ... , ... The MIT bioLogic design team has won multiple A' Design ... can be applied to fabric and formed into living interfaces between body and environment. ... change. The team harvested Natto cells and applied them to fabric with custom 3D ...
(Date:4/29/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... April 29, 2016 , ... Summit ... (NSCF) to support the development of a patient-specific stem cell therapy for the treatment ... the lab of Dr. Jeanne Loring at The Scripps Research Institute in San Diego, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: