Navigation Links
Children living near toxic waste sites experience higher blood lead levels resulting in lower IQ
Date:5/5/2013

May 6, 2013 /Press Release/ Children living near toxic waste sites in lower and middle income countries such as India, Philippines and Indonesia may experience higher blood lead levels, resulting in a loss of IQ points and a higher incidence of mental retardation, according to a study presented today by Kevin Chatham-Stephens, MD, Pediatric Environmental Health Fellow at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting on May 6 in Washington, DC.

The study titled, "The Pediatric Burden of Disease from Lead Exposure at Toxic Waste Sites in Low and Middle Income Countries in 2010," was a joint research partnership between Mount Sinai and the Blacksmith Institute.

Researchers measured lead levels in soil and drinking water at 200 toxic waste sites in 31 countries then estimated the blood lead levels in 779,989 children who were potentially exposed to lead from these sites in 2010. The blood lead levels ranged from 1.5 to 104 g/dL, with an average of 21 g/dL in children ages four years and younger. According to Dr. Chatham-Stephens, first author of the study, these higher blood lead levels could result in an estimated loss of five to eight IQ points per child and an incidence of mild mental retardation in 6 out of every 1,000 children.

"The average blood lead level in an American child is approximately 1.3 g/dL," said Dr. Chatham-Stephens. "Our research found an average predicted blood lead level of 21 g/dL, which is very high. Lead has serious, long-term health consequences such as the potential to impair cognitive development in children and cause mental retardation." The condition of mental retardation is defined as having an IQ below 70.

"On a global level, this analysis highlights the importance of assigning more public health resources to identify, evaluate and remediate lead-contaminated toxic waste sites in these countries," said Philip Landrigan, MD, MSc, Dean for Global Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, one of the authors of the study. "In order to prevent further detrimental effects on neurodevelopment in children, these countries should create programs to identify toxic wastes and reduce lead exposure."

"This study is important because, to our knowledge, the burden of disease from these toxic waste sites has never been calculated before," said Dr. Chatham-Stephens. "We are showing that children who were chronically exposed to toxic waste sites in lower and middle income countries could have had high lead blood levels."


'/>"/>

Contact: Renatt Brodsky
Renatt.Brodsky@mountsinai.org
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Should we play hide-and-go-seek with our childrens vegetables?
2. New study compares diets for weight management in obese children
3. Researchers unravel genetic mechanism of fatty liver disease in obese children
4. Genetic abnormality offers diagnostic hope for childrens cancer
5. Researchers pinpoint genetic pathway of rare facial malformation in children
6. WanderID Launches Breakthrough ID Product for Children, Seniors
7. Common genetic variants identify autism risk in high risk siblings of children with ASD
8. Children exposed to the common pollutant naphthalene show signs of chromosomal damage
9. BGI and the Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia launch the 1,000 Rare Diseases Project
10. Child welfare investigation predicts mental health problems in young children
11. New book inspires children to protect dugongs
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/26/2017)... , Feb. 25, 2017  Securus Technologies, ... technology solutions for public safety, investigation, corrections and ... Recidivism and Reentry. "Too often, too ... prisons and county jails are trying to tackle ... inmates and friends and family members. While significant steps ...
(Date:2/21/2017)... -- Der weltweite Biobanking-Sektor wird bis zum ... mit mehr als 50 Vertretern aus verschiedenen Branchen wurde aber ... diese Prognose zu realisieren. ... Zu den Schwierigkeiten für ... für die Biobank, die Implementierung Zeit sparender Technologien, ein ...
(Date:2/13/2017)... Feb. 13, 2017 Former 9/11 Commission border ... Committee, Janice Kephart of Identity Strategy Partners, ... Donald Trump,s "Executive Order: Protecting the Nation From ... 2017):  "As President Trump,s ,Travel Ban, Executive ... now essentially banned the travel ban, it is important ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/23/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Ellen Matloff, president and CEO of My ... a 2017 Women of Innovation® finalist. Matloff will be among several women to ... dinner recognizes women accomplished in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), along with ...
(Date:3/23/2017)... March 23, 2017 In today,s ... equities in the Biotech industry: Sangamo Therapeutics Inc. (NASDAQ: ... (NYSE MKT: SYN), and Regulus Therapeutics Inc. (NASDAQ: ... 2017, Credit Suisse upgraded its rating on Pharmaceuticals/Biotechnology to "Overweight" from "Market ... free report at: ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... SANTA MONICA, Calif. , March 22, 2017 ... Council (MassMEDIC) are proud to announce their extended partnership ... Week will be headlined by the 21 st ... UBM,s BIOMEDevice Boston, taking place May 3-4, 2017. ... with Advanced Medical Technology Association (ADVAMED) President and ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... , March 22, 2017 MarketNewsUpdates.com ... ... cancer conditions are being pressured as of late due to ... cancer pain management has a dramatic impact on patient,s quality ... and development activities for identifying new forms of opioid formulations ...
Breaking Biology Technology: