Navigation Links
Children living in apartments with nonsmoking adults still exposed
Date:5/1/2010

The majority of children living in apartments are exposed to secondhand smoke, even when they don't live with smokers. This study from the University of Rochester Medical Center is the first to examine whether housing type is a potential contributor to children's exposure to cigarette smoke. The abstract was presented this morning at the Pediatric Academic Society Meeting in Vancouver, Canada.

Among children who lived in an apartment, 84 percent had been exposed to tobacco smoke, according to the level of a biomarker (cotinine) in their blood that indicates exposure to nicotine found in tobacco, and this included more than 9 of 10 African-American and white children. Even among children who lived in detached houses, 70 percent showed evidence of exposure.

"We are starting to understand the role that seepage through walls and through shared ventilation may impact tobacco smoke exposure in apartments," said Karen Wilson, M.D., MPH, author of the study and an assistant professor of Pediatrics at the University of Rochester Medical Center's Golisano Children's Hospital. "We see that children are being exposed in ways we are not picking up, and it's important, for their health, that we figure out where this exposure is taking place, and work to eliminate it. Multi-unit housing is one potential source, but a very important one."

Previous studies have shown that children with cotinine levels indicating tobacco smoke exposure have higher rates of respiratory diseases, decreased cognitive abilities and decreased antioxidant levels.

The study analyzed data from almost 6,000 children between 6- and 18-years-old in a national database (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2006) to see if there was any relationship between their smoke exposure and their housing type. Apartment living was associated with a 45 percent increase in cotinine levels for African American children and a 207 percent increase for white children. About 18 percent of U.S. children live in apartments, and many of these children are living in subsidized housing communities where smoking is more prevalent.

Wilson said many parents are trying to limit their children's tobacco smoke exposure by not allowing smoking in their apartments, but they say they can smell tobacco smoke coming from other apartments or from common areas. Last summer, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development released a memo recommending that their housing developments enact smoke-free policies. A smoking ban within multi-unit, subsidized housing could further reduce the tobacco smoke exposure for children and reduce smoking rates among residents.


'/>"/>

Contact: Heather Hare
heather_hare@urmc.rochester.edu
585-273-2840
University of Rochester Medical Center
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Fat still on the childrens menu
2. Many parents at-risk for cancer disclose genetic test results to children
3. Restless legs syndrome affects nearly 2 percent of US/UK children
4. Children with autism dont adapt as readily to unfamiliar faces
5. Seattle Childrens Hospital leads $23.7 million NIH grant to study gene repair
6. Soft drinks alone do not affect childrens weight
7. Thousands of starving children could be restored to health with peanut butter program
8. A step toward tissue-engineered heart structures for children
9. Studies: Children obese due to a host of unhealthy pressures
10. UD named a regional research participant in National Children’s Study
11. Influenza vaccine causes weaker immune response for children of rural Gabon than in semi-urban areas
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/15/2016)... , December 15, 2016 Arvato ... an agreement with NuData Security, an award-winning international ... will enable clients to focus on good customer experience, balancing ... regulation. ... In order to provide a one-stop fraud prevention suite, Arvato ...
(Date:12/15/2016)... 2016 Advancements in biometrics will ... and wellbeing (HWW), and security of vehicles ... passenger vehicles begin to feature fingerprint recognition, ... beat monitoring, brain wave monitoring, stress detection, ... pulse detection. These will be driven by ...
(Date:12/12/2016)... Dec. 12, 2016  Researchers at Trinity College, ... graphene by combining the material with Silly Putty. The ... pressure detector able to sense pulse, blood pressure, ... spider.  The research team,s findings ... read here:  http://science.sciencemag.org/content/354/6317/1257 ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/18/2017)... , Jan. 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ - SQI ... sciences and diagnostics company that develops and commercializes ... ("SQI" or the "Company"), today announced that ... Inc. ("Kingsdale"), has resigned from its Board of ... changes to securities regulations that have limited both ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... ... January 17, 2017 , ... ... Factor (RF) to its VALIDATE® SP2 calibration verification / linearity test kit. VALIDATE® ... serum base. Each VALIDATE® SP2 kit is prepared using the CLSI recommended “equal ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... The Global Implantable Biomaterials Market is ... 7.5% over the next decade to reach approximately ... trends that the market is witnessing include increasing ... transplant surgeries and medical implants and technological advancements. ... into immunomodulatory biomaterials, natural, polymers, hydrogels and ceramics. ...
(Date:1/17/2017)... -- Roka Bioscience, Inc. (NASDAQ: ROKA ), a molecular ... of foodborne pathogens today announced the appointment of Mary Duseau ... , the Company,s President and CEO since 2009, who will assume ... changes are effective today. In addition, Ms. Duseau will ... ...
Breaking Biology Technology: