Navigation Links
Chicks to give scientists clearer picture of fetal development
Date:11/14/2008

Scientists hope to gain a greater understanding of disease and birth defects with a new imaging database that will map the expression of genes that control development.

The research coordinated by The Roslin Institute at the University of Edinburgh, in collaboration with the MRC Human Genetics Unit (Edinburgh), University College London, University of Bath and Trinity College Dublin, will log thousands of three dimensional images of chicks taken during the first 10 days of their development.

The so-called chick atlas will exploit the information and resources recently made available from the sequencing of the mouse and chicken genomes. In particular, it will build on the pioneering Edinburgh Mouse Atlas at the MRC Human Genetics Unit in Edinburgh (e-MouseAtlas.org).

Images from the chick atlas will show not only where genes key to our biological make-up are switched on but also when they are turned on and off to ensure healthy development.

The 2.6 million initiative, which is funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Science Research Council (BBSRC) through its new LOLA ("longer and larger") scheme will help researchers understand why problems occur in the development of limbs and of the nervous system, which can cause conditions such as spina bifida.

In the long term it could also have implications for the treatment of diseases such as cancer as it will provide insight into the role genes play when cells divide and proliferate.

The images will be stored in an online database, which can be accessed and added to by scientists from across the world. As an online database or encyclopaedia it is also available to the public and educators, to be used as a tool to teach development.

Professor Dave Burt, of the Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, said: "The chick atlas has the benefit of looking at how genes relate to development in both time and space; letting us know when and where genes make an impact."

"These early stages of a chick embryo are essential in the development of the nervous system, heart and limbs and by understanding what happens we can also understand why things may go wrong."

In the initial stages the chick atlas will look at mapping 1,000 of around 18,000 chick genes predicted from the chicken genome sequence. By cross referencing similarities with the mouse atlas, scientists can identify the most relevant genes in human development.

Professor Richard Baldock, of the MRC's Human Genetics Unit in Edinburgh said: "The mouse atlas team will contribute their expertise in atlas databases to deliver this important resource. The ability to capture and compare data between species will provide critical clues to how embryogenesis is controlled by gene activity. As a physicist and computer scientist this is an exciting time to be in biomedical research".


'/>"/>

Contact: Tara Womersley
tara.womersley@ed.ac.uk
01-316-509-836
University of Edinburgh
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Exposing chicks to maternal stress leads to long-term reproductive success
2. High hormone levels in seabird chicks prepare them to kill their siblings
3. NYU biologist Bonneau named among 20 "visionary" scientists under 40 by Discover magazine
4. Scientists announce major progress towards historic Census of Marine Life in 2010
5. Washington University scientists first to sequence genome of cancer patient
6. Scripps research scientists identify compounds for stem-cell production from adult cells
7. 12 outstanding young scientists named as EMBO Young Investigators
8. Scripps Florida scientists awarded $1.5M to fight major water and food parasites
9. European biodiversity and ecosystem scientists merge and gear up for long-term research
10. Scientists unveil mechanism for up and down in plants
11. Scientists identify cell changes leading to impaired artificial kidney function
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:4/5/2017)...  The Allen Institute for Cell Science today announces ... portal and dynamic digital window into the human cell. ... application of deep learning to create predictive models of ... a growing suite of powerful tools. The Allen Cell ... publicly available resources created and shared by the Allen ...
(Date:4/3/2017)... , April 3, 2017  Data ... precision engineering platform, detected a statistically significant ... product prior to treatment and objective response ... the potential to predict whether cancer patients ... to treatment, as well as to improve ...
(Date:3/29/2017)... , March 29, 2017  higi, the health IT ... North America , today announced a ... the acquisition of EveryMove. The new investment and acquisition ... of tools to transform population health activities through the ... data. higi collects and secures data today ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/19/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Tunnell Consulting has been solving the most complex ... challenges faced by life sciences, biotech and pharmaceuticals companies today is in interpreting the ... , who is well known in the industry and brings significant high-level expertise to ...
(Date:6/16/2017)... , ... June 16, 2017 , ... CTNext , ... Innovation Awards (EIA), held at The LOFT at Chelsea Piers in Stamford. , Nine ... to a panel of judges for an opportunity to secure $10,000 awards to help ...
(Date:6/15/2017)... ... 15, 2017 , ... angelMD announced the closure of a ... angelMD’s SVP of Corporate Development, served as the syndicate leader for this first ... Saranas’ recently announced $4 million Series B financing round. , Saranas is working ...
(Date:6/14/2017)... ... June 14, 2017 , ... The Thailand Board ... announces that they’re co-hosting a delegation from Thailand at BIO 2017 in San ... industry gathering in the world, regroups more than 1,100 biotech companies, academic institutions, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: