Navigation Links
Chemical found in medical devices impairs heart function
Date:4/30/2009

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have found that a chemical commonly used in the production of such medical plastic devices as intravenous (IV) bags and catheters can impair heart function in rats. Appearing online this week in the American Journal of Physiology, these new findings suggest a possible new reason for some of the common side effectsloss of taste, short term memory lossof medical procedures that require blood to be circulated through plastic tubing outside the body, such as heart bypass surgery or kidney dialysis. These findings also have strong implications for the future of medical plastics manufacturing.

In addition to loss of taste and memory, coronary bypass patients often complain of swelling and fatigue. These side effects usually resolve within a few months after surgery, but they are troubling and sometimes hinder recovery.

His personal experience with coronary bypass surgery propelled his search for a root cause for the loss of taste phenomenon, reports principal investigator Artin Shoukas, Ph.D., professor of biomedical engineering, physiology and anesthesiology and critical care medicine at Johns Hopkins. "I'm a chocoholic, and after my bypass surgery everything tasted awful, and chocolate tasted like charcoal for months."

Shoukas and Caitlin Thompson-Torgerson, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in anesthesiology and critical care medicine suspected that the trigger for these side effects might be a chemical compound of some kind.

To test their theory, Shoukas and his team of researchers took liquid samples from IV bags and bypass machines before they were used on patients. The team analyzed the fluids in another machine that can identify unknown chemicals and found the liquid to contain a chemical compound called cyclohexanone. The researchers thought that the cyclohexanone in the fluid samples might have leached from the plastic. Although the amount of cyclohexanone leaching from these devices varied greatly, all fluid samples contained at least some detectable level of the chemical.

The researchers then injected rats with either a salt solution or a salt solution containing cyclohexanone and measured heart function. Rats that got only salt solution pumped approximately 200 microliters of blood per heartbeat and had an average heart rate of 358 beats per minute, while rats injected with cyclohexanone pumped only about 150 microliters of blood per heartbeat with an average heart rate of 287 beats per minute.

In addition to pumping less blood more slowly, rats injected with cyclohexanone had weaker heart contractions. The team calculated that cyclohexanone caused a 50 percent reduction in the strength of each heart contraction. They also found that the reflex that helps control and maintain blood pressure is much less sensitive after cyclohexanone exposure. Finally, the team observed increased fluid retention and swelling in the rats after cyclohexanone injections.

According to Thompson-Torgerson and Shoukas, they would like to figure out how these side effectsdecreased heart function and swellingoccur and to what degree cyclohexanone is involved. Despite the findings in this study, they emphasize that patients should listen carefully to the advice of their physicians. "We would never recommend that patients decline this type of treatment if they need it," says Shoukas. "On the contrary, such technologies are life-saving medical advances, and their benefits still far outweigh the risks of the associated side effects. As scientists, we are simply trying to understand how the side effects are triggered and what the best method will be to mitigate, and ultimately remedy, these morbidities."


'/>"/>

Contact: Audrey Huang
audrey@jhmi.edu
410-614-5105
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Synthetic chemical offers solution for crops facing drought
2. Potentially harmful chemicals found in forest fire smoke
3. American Chemical Societys Weekly PressPac -- April 22, 2009
4. American Chemical Society Weekly PressPac -- April 15, 2009
5. American Chemical Society Weekly PressPac -- April 8, 2009
6. UNC study: Scientists identify chemical compound that may stop deadly brain tumors
7. American Chemical Society Weekly PressPac -- April 1, 2009
8. Engineers develop method to disperse chemically modified graphene in organic solvents
9. Margarita Saenz, M.D. is recipient of Genzyme/ACMGF Fellowship in Biochemical Genetics
10. Microbes in mud flats clean up oil spill chemicals
11. American Chemical Societys weekly PressPac -- March 11, 2009
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:11/29/2016)... Lithuania , Nov. 29, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... biometric identification and object recognition technologies, today ... (SDK) for fingerprint recognition solutions that run ... a fingerprint template using less than 128KB ... in compact devices that have limited on-board ...
(Date:11/22/2016)... November 22, 2016 According to the new market ... Print, Face, Vein, Signature, Voice), Multi-Factor), Component (Hardware and Software), Function (Contact ... MarketsandMarkets, the market is expected to grow from USD 10.74 Billion in ... 16.79% between 2016 and 2022. Continue Reading ... ...
(Date:11/17/2016)... Global Market Watch: Primarily supported by ... Banks and Academics) market is to witness a value of ... the highest Compounded Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 10.75% is ... analysis period 2014-2020. North America is ... Europe at 9.56% respectively. Report ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... Cambrian ... for industrial facilities, today announced that one of the nation’s fastest growing craft ... novel water-energy purchase agreement (WEPA). Under the WEPA, a first for the industrial ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... ... December 07, 2016 , ... Kara Dwyer Dodge grew up hearing stories of the sea ... in Scituate, Mass., found a sea turtle entangled in the lines of one of his ... a minor sensation because no one could remember ever seeing one so large so close ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... NJ (PRWEB) , ... December 06, 2016 , ... ... paper on December 1, 2016 asking the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) to consider ... study of OA, OARSI is concerned about the growing population of OA patients, ...
(Date:12/6/2016)... ... December 06, 2016 , ... ... company, today announced it has acquired the assets of Theorem Clinical Research ... and focuses on clinical trial drug packaging, labeling, storage, reconciliation, and distribution ...
Breaking Biology Technology: