Navigation Links
Charles Drew University, UC Irvine awarded $480,000 grant for research low birth weight infants
Date:3/3/2010

Los Angeles, CA Researchers at Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science and UC Irvine will monitor the day-to-day health of low-birth-weight babies and their parents as part of a comprehensive initiative designed to combat chronic illnesses associated with low-weight births.

Karen Cheng, CDU psychiatry and human behavior professor, and Gillian Hayes, UCI informatics professor, were awarded a $480,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to explore how recorded observations of daily living (ODLs) can be used to improve clinical care for low-weight babies.

Cheng and Hayes were among five research teams in the nation selected by RWJF through its Project HealthDesign: Rethinking the Power and Potential of Personal Health Records. They will receive a two-year grant to measure how health information can help people become more informed patients and better healthcare consumers. The grantees will explore how day-to-day information such as stress levels of parents of premature infantscan be collected, interpreted and acted upon in real-world clinical settings.

For their project, Cheng and Hayes will use mobile technology to collect and report daily observations that can enable changes in clinical practices and alert healthcare providers earlier to potential problems. The team will develop a mobile application for parents of preterm infants, called FitBaby, which builds on Hayes' past work with Dr. Dan Cooper, a UCI professor of pediatrics. The system enables parents to easily record daily observations on smartphones, including feeding times, weight measurements, baby's activity and how parents deal with the stress of caring for an at-risk infant. The system also automatically tracks some observations through sensors in the environment.

"This work is particularly innovative in that we make it convenient for parents to record daily information about their babies by automatically sensing a number of important indicators," Hayes said. "Pediatricians will have access to the information to make earlier diagnoses, which can improve the health outcomes of babies and caregivers."

"Parent well-being is often ignored in infant care," Cheng said. "By helping parents monitor and understand the patterns of their own emotional and physical well-being, we believe that parents will be encouraged to take better care for themselves, leading to better quality of care for the babies."

Earlier Project HealthDesign work revealed that the data needed to inform day-to-day health decisions came less often from information contained in official medical records and more from information gained by monitoring health in everyday life. The new projects will build on that work.

"We know patients want better relationships with their clinicians and to make the most of their time during a doctor's visit. Through Project HealthDesign, the patients and the clinicians will be working together to collect and interpret insights from the patient's everyday life. This process will help empower people to be more informed patients and allow clinicians to determine if their care plan is working," said Stephen Downs, S.M., assistant vice president for RWJF's Health Group.

Since its launch in 2006, RWJF has committed $9.5 million in grants and technical assistance to the program, led by a team of experts working in health information technology and patient-centered care at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Project HealthDesign is supported by RWJF's Pioneer Portfolio, which funds innovative ideas and projects that can lead to significant breakthroughs in the future of health and health care.

In addition, the program provides legal and regulatory compliance support to grantees and contributes to the public discourse on the legal and regulatory aspects of capturing ODLs and integrating them into care processes. The program will develop resources around the cross-cutting issues regarding use and safe integrations of ODLs as well as specifically advise grantee teams on applicable law and regulations that may alter the consequences of data-sharing between patients and clinicians.

Hayes' research interests are in human-computer interaction and ubiquitous computing. She studies record-keeping technologies, particularly in natural settings, such as the home. She also focuses on the application and uses of ubiquitous computing and collaborative technologies in the areas of education and healthcare.

Cheng is a social psychologist whose research focuses on the issues affecting use of computer technology in healthcare settings. Her work evaluates the efficacy of electronic versus paper-based data collection, and the acceptance of mobile health technologies among underserved populations, locally and in developing countries.


'/>"/>

Contact: Elia Esparza
eliaesparza@cdrewu.edu
323-563-5822
Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Charles Drew cancer studies with yeast yield excellent results
2. Charles Darwin: More than the origin
3. Charles Darwin and modern biology
4. Charles Darwin really did have advanced ideas about the origin of life
5. 2009 Charles River Laboratories Excellence in Refinement Award
6. Why do we choose our mates? Ask Charles Darwin, prof says
7. Pest management specialist Charles Summers wins prestigious Woodworth Award
8. GEN joins Charles Darwin 2009 celebration
9. TSC honors Sen. Charles Schumer
10. The surprising story of Charles Darwin and his homeopathic doctor
11. Hebrew University, American researchers show trigger to stem cell differentiation
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Charles Drew University, UC Irvine awarded $480,000 grant for research low birth weight infants
(Date:6/21/2016)... VANCOUVER, British Columbia , June 21, 2016 ... been appointed to the new role of principal ... has been named the director of customer development. ... , NuData,s chief technical officer. The moves reflect ... development teams in response to high customer demand ...
(Date:6/16/2016)... 2016 The global ... reach USD 1.83 billion by 2024, according to ... Technological proliferation and increasing demand in commercial buildings, ... drive the market growth.      (Logo: ... development of advanced multimodal techniques for biometric authentication ...
(Date:6/9/2016)... control systems is proud to announce the introduction of fingerprint attendance control software, allowing ... are actually signing in, and to even control the opening of doors. ... ... ... Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160609/377487 ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... , June 23, 2016 A person commits ... the crime scene to track the criminal down. ... U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) uses DNA evidence to ... Sound far-fetched? It,s not. The FDA has ... to support investigations of foodborne illnesses. Put as simply as ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... FRANCISCO , June 23, 2016   EpiBiome ... has secured $1 million in debt financing from Silicon ... ramp up automation and to advance its drug development ... its new facility. "SVB has been an ... beyond the services a traditional bank would provide," said ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Calif. , June 23, 2016  Blueprint Bio, ... biological discoveries to the medical community, has closed its ... Matthew Nunez . "We have received ... with the capital we need to meet our current ... essentially provide us the runway to complete validation on ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... line of intelligent tools designed, tuned and optimized exclusively for Okuma CNC machining ... Chicago. The result of a collaboration among several companies with expertise in toolholding, ...
Breaking Biology Technology: