Navigation Links
Changing the conversation -- polymers disrupt bacterial communication
Date:11/11/2013

Artificial materials based on simple synthetic polymers can disrupt the way in which bacteria communicate with each other, a study led by scientists at The University of Nottingham has shown.

The findings, published in the journal Nature Chemistry, could further our knowledge on how better to control and exploit bacteria in the future and will have implications for work in the emerging field of synthetic biology.

Professor Cameron Alexander, in the University's School of Pharmacy, led the study. He said: "This is an exciting and unexpected finding for us and comes as a result of research which was very much curiosity driven.

"It gives us more information about how to design artificial cells and to produce materials that will interact with microorganisms and control their behaviour, with a whole host of potential applications including drug discovery and energy production."

The study, which also involved scientists from the universities of Birmingham and Newcastle, was funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and The University of Nottingham.

As part of their research into the development of artificial cells and programmable bacterial coatings, the team found that polymers long-chain molecules that were able to arrange bacteria into clustered communities were, surprisingly, encouraging these bacteria to actively 'talk' to each other. This communication occurred by quorum sensing (QS), a way in which bacteria signal to each other, and coordinate response to environment. Quorum sensing also controls the way in which bacteria release certain types of molecules for example as a defence mechanism or as tools for infection.

This finding opens up the possibility to influence microbial behaviour by controlling their ability to form productive communities. This can be exploited to prevent the release of toxin
'/>"/>

Contact: Emma Thorne
emma.thorne@nottingham.ac.uk
44-011-595-15793
University of Nottingham
Source:Eurekalert

Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Costs for changing pollution criteria in Florida waters likely to exceed EPA estimates
2. Beating famine: Sustainable food security through land regeneration in a changing climate
3. Athletic frogs have faster-changing genomes
4. 50 years of bird poop links DDT with changing bird menus
5. University of Minnesota startup offers game-changing energy solutions that reduce CO2 emissions
6. Nitrogen pollution changing Rocky Mountain National Park vegetation, says CU-Boulder-led study
7. Deadly liver cancer may be triggered by cells changing identity, UCSF study shows
8. Back to the future: A new science for a changing planet
9. Satellite images tell tales of changing biodiversity
10. Did the changing climate shrink Europes ancient hippos?
11. Changing climate, not tourism, seems to be driving decline in chinstrap-penguin populations
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/17/2014)... 15, 2014  HITLAB SM announced today its completion ... its adherence to current U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... smart device and smart phone application trials utilizing the ... "HITLAB is determined to improve global healthcare access, ...
(Date:12/11/2014)... , Dec. 09, 2014 Research and Markets ... ( http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/twhjll/biometrics_market ) has announced the addition of ...  report to their offering. One major ... With continuous advances in technology, it is important to ...
(Date:12/10/2014)... RALEIGH, N.C. , Dec. 9, 2014  Valencell, a ... it is seeing a staggering demand from its licensees ... the Company revealed, is not solely coming from fitness ... as well. "A wearable is only as ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):HITLAB Completes GCP Audit for FDA Smart Device & App Compliance 2Biometrics Market in the APAC Region 2015-2019: Key Vendors are 3M Cogent, NEC, Safran and Suprema 2Wearable Technology Products Demand Highly Accurate Biometric Technology 2
... the number of deer in forests and parks may ... in that area, new research suggests. A ... National Park Service found that higher deer activity is ... species of snakes, salamanders, and invertebrates studied, a greater ...
... the disparity between the numbers of African Americans living ... A study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg ... substantially reduced when comparing groups of African Americans and ... are published in the November 2008 print edition of ...
... release is available in German . , ... the yellow bananas are bright blue, as discovered by scientists ... York, USA). The team, headed by Bernhard Krutler, reports in ... is connected to the degradation of chlorophyll that occurs during ...
Cached Biology News:Snakes, salamanders and other creatures thrive in areas with higher deer populations 2Snakes, salamanders and other creatures thrive in areas with higher deer populations 3Hypertension disparity linked to environment 2Blue bananas 2
(Date:1/22/2015)... 22, 2015 Shimadzu Scientific Instruments ... multipurpose UV-visible spectrophotometer. Offering wavelength scanning from 190 ... ideal for applications in a variety of industries, ... The user-friendly UV-1280 enables intuitive operation, while the ...
(Date:1/22/2015)... The laboratory information management systems market is ... of technological advancements due to factors such as rising ... integrate healthcare systems, and increasing government support for adoption ... Key players in the market focus on technological advancements ...
(Date:1/22/2015)... Dr. Greg Leyer of UAS Labs recently was invited to ... on probiotics in San Diego, CA. , The Scripps ... health care professionals. This year’s pre-conference seminar was held on ... Dr. Leyer spoke about the emerging topics and science in ...
(Date:1/22/2015)... , Jan. 22, 2015   Cypher Genomics, ... Sequenom, Inc. (NASDAQ: SQNM ), the ... agreement for next generation noninvasive prenatal tests (NIPT). ... interpretation technology, called Mantis™, to advance analysis of ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Shimadzu’s New Monitored Single-Beam UV-Vis Spectrophotometer Offers Comprehensive Measurement Options in a Compact Body 2Laboratory Information Management Systems Market is Expected to Reach $1,323.6 Million by 2019 - New Research Report by MarketsandMarkets 2Laboratory Information Management Systems Market is Expected to Reach $1,323.6 Million by 2019 - New Research Report by MarketsandMarkets 3Laboratory Information Management Systems Market is Expected to Reach $1,323.6 Million by 2019 - New Research Report by MarketsandMarkets 4Cypher Genomics and Sequenom Announce Development Agreement 2Cypher Genomics and Sequenom Announce Development Agreement 3Cypher Genomics and Sequenom Announce Development Agreement 4
... Norlight Telecommunications , a Brookfield, Wisconsin, ... Protocol service for small and medium-sized businesses in Wisconsin ... to offer the service to businesses in Minnesota, Michigan, ... marketing. , , IPLive will integrate voice, data ...
... Groups IT shop, he wasnt coming into a crisis or ... IT organization with strong connections to the business and was ... big shoes to fill, Rick needed a sophisticated approach to ... that when you tie IT to financial services, the situation ...
... Despite all the financial and mental effort put ... will never get past a limited release or even ... further into the spotlight is the Wisconsin Innovation ... Whitewater-based division of the University of Wisconsin Extensions Small ...
Cached Biology Technology:CIO of CUNA Mutual Group talks on business-IT fusion 2CIO of CUNA Mutual Group talks on business-IT fusion 3UW-Whitewater center helps inventors get to market 2UW-Whitewater center helps inventors get to market 3UW-Whitewater center helps inventors get to market 4
JTV1 gene...
APO-BrdU™ TUNEL Assay Kit *with Alexa Fluor® 488 anti-BrdU* *60 assays*...
The FlowTACS Apoptosis Detection Kit is designed specifically for in situdetection of apoptotic...
Recombinant Rat PTX2/SAP...
Biology Products: