Navigation Links
Changes in brain's blood flow could cause 'brain freeze'
Date:4/22/2012

SAN DIEGO 'Brain freeze' is a nearly universal experiencealmost everyone has felt the near-instantaneous headache brought on by a bite of ice cream or slurp of ice-cold soda on the upper palate. However, scientists are still at a loss to explain this phenomenon. Since migraine sufferers are more likely to experience brain freeze than people who don't have this often-debilitating condition, brain freeze may share a common mechanism with other types of headaches, including those brought on by the trauma of blast-related combat injuries in soldiers. One possible link between brain freeze and other headache types is local changes in brain blood flow.

In a new study, Melissa Mary Blatt, Michael Falvo, and Jessica Jasien of the Department of Veterans Affairs New Jersey Health Care System, Brian Deegan and Gearold O Laighin of the National University of Ireland Galway, and Jorge Serrador of Harvard Medical School and the War Related Illness and Injury Study Center of the Veterans Affairs New Jersey Health Care System use brain freeze as a proxy for other types of headaches. By bringing on brain freeze in the lab in volunteers and studying blood flow in their brains, the researchers show that the sudden headache seems to be triggered by an abrupt increase in blood flow in the anterior cerebral artery and disappears when this artery constricts. The findings could eventually lead to new treatments for a variety of different headache types.

An abstract of their study entitled, "Cerebral Vascular Blood Flow Changes During 'Brain Freeze,'" will be discussed at the meeting Experimental Biology 2012 being held April 21-25 at the San Diego Convention Center. The abstract is sponsored by the American Physiological Society (APS), one of six scientific societies sponsoring the conference, which last year attracted some 14,000 attendees.

Bringing on Brain Freeze

According to study leader Serrador, previous studies meant to assess what physiological changes might prompt headaches have mainly relied on various drugs, or brought in patients already in the throes of a migraine to the lab. However, both methods have their limitations. Pharmacological agents can induce other effects that can make research results misleading, he says, and since researchers can't wait for migraine sufferers to experience a migraine in the lab, those studies miss the crucial period of headache formation that occurs sometimes hours before scientists were able to study these patients.

To induce headache inside the lab and study it from start to finish, Serrador explains, brain freeze is a perfect fit. It's easy to bring on and resolves quickly without expensive or complicated equipment or drugs.

In this study, Serrador and his colleague recruited 13 healthy adults. The researchers monitored the volunteers' blood flow in several brain arteries using transcranial Doppler while they first sipped ice water with the straw pressed against their upper palateideal conditions for bringing on brain freezeand then while sipping the same amount of water at room temperature. The volunteers raised their hand once they felt the pain of a brain freeze, then raised it again once the pain dissipated. Findings showed that one particular artery, called the anterior cerebral artery, dilated rapidly and flooded the brain with blood in conjunction to when the volunteers felt pain. Soon after this dilation occurred, the same vessel constricted as the volunteers' pain receded.

Changing the Course of Headaches

Serrador and his colleagues speculate that the dilation, then quick constriction, may be a type of self-defense for the brain. "The brain is one of the relatively important organs in the body, and it needs to be working all the time," he explains. "It's fairly sensitive to temperature, so vasodilation might be moving warm blood inside tissue to make sure the brain stays warm." But because the skull is a closed structure, Serrador adds, the sudden influx of blood could raise pressure and induce pain. The following vasoconstriction may be a way to bring pressure down in the brain before it reaches dangerous levels.

He notes that similar alterations in blood flow could be at work in migraines, posttraumatic headaches, and other headache types. If further research confirms these suspicions, then finding ways to control blood flow could offer new treatments for these conditions. Drugs that block sudden vasodilation or target channels involved specifically in the vasodilation of headaches could be one way of changing headaches' course.


'/>"/>

Contact: Donna Krupa
dkrupa@the-aps.org
American Physiological Society
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Scientists find that neurological changes can happen due to social status
2. How old are these rocks, how were they made, and how long ago did these geologic changes happen?
3. Holding a mirror to brain changes in autism
4. New research shows childhood adversity causes changes in genetics
5. ChromaDex® Announces Management Changes
6. The influence of estrogen on female mood changes
7. Team finds a better way to gauge the climate costs of land use changes
8. Upper atmosphere facilitates changes that let mercury enter food chain
9. Paleoclimate record points toward potential rapid climate changes
10. Study of Yellowstone wolves improves ability to predict their responses to environmental changes
11. Study finds climate changes faster than species can adapt
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/3/2016)... India , February 3, 2016 ... the new market research report "Automated Fingerprint Identification System ... Search, Latent Search), Application (Banking & Finance, Government, Healthcare, ... published by MarketsandMarkets, the market is expected to be ... CAGR of 21.0% between 2015 and 2020. The transformation ...
(Date:2/2/2016)... , Feb. 2, 2016  BioMEMS devices ... primarily focused on medical screening and diagnostic ... parameters. Wearable devices that facilitate and assure ... of movement are being bolstered through new ... biomedical signal acquisition coupled with wireless connectivity ...
(Date:2/2/2016)... NEW YORK , Feb. 2, 2016 Technology ... service presents an analysis of the digital and computed ... Malaysia , and Indonesia ... current trends and market size, as well as regional ... by country and discusses market penetration and market attractiveness, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/4/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... February 04, 2016 , ... ... enterprise talent development and compliance training, today announced an interactive FDA compliance ... Playbook™. The RAPS (Regulatory Affairs Professional Society) accredited interactive course on Morf ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 04, ... ... conference presented by Bloomsburg University’s Digital Forensics Club, takes place February 5-6 ... two-day event features 20+ speakers and activities such as workshops and competitions ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... --> --> Q BioMed ... provide the following update on recent corporate developments. ... months we have significantly increased our cash position through several ... result, we have positioned ourselves to execute on the initial ... that development to continue on schedule. --> ...
(Date:2/4/2016)... ... February 04, 2016 , ... ... leading supplier of Semantic Graph Database technology has been recognized As “ Best ... by Corporate America Magazine. , “At Corporate America, it’s our priority to showcase ...
Breaking Biology Technology: