Navigation Links
Carnegie Mellon urges industry to broaden carbon footprint calculations
Date:8/15/2008

PITTSBURGHCarnegie Mellon University researchers are urging companies to embrace new methods for following the trail of dangerous carbon emissions that are responsible for much of the world's global warming threats.

Because there is no universally accepted way of calculating someone's carbon footprint, dozens of carbon calculators have sprung up on the Internet in the past few years creating confusion and inaccurate information. In addition, accepted frameworks for tracking industry carbon emissions rely on "tiers'' of increasingly broad scope. Tier one generally includes emissions by the company's own activities, such as burning gasoline in fleet vehicles or natural gas in its facilities. The second tier boundary expands to include emissions from electricity and steam purchased by the company. Tier three includes all other emissions, including the entire supply chain of goods and services.

In practice, most companies reporting their greenhouse gas emissions opt to use only tier one or the tier two boundary. To put the implications of this boundary decision into context, Carnegie Mellon researchers H. Scott Matthews, Chris T. Hendrickson and Christopher L. Weber, have developed a new method that estimates the amount of greenhouse gas emissions across all tiers of the entire supply chain for all industries.

"By far, most companies are pursuing very limited footprints toe prints really instead of comprehensive ones," said Matthews, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering and engineering and public policy.

In an Aug. 15 article for Environmental Science & Technology, the authors report that two-thirds of U.S. industries would overlook 75 percent of their total greenhouse gas emissions if they continue to use the same tier one or tier two reporting boundaries. The average industry has only 14 percent of its total greenhouse gas emissions in tier one and 12 percent in tier two for a total of 26 percent.

Specifically, the research finds that only 6 percent of the publishing industry's greenhouse gas emissions result from its tier one and tier two uses of petroleum products and electricity. However, there are large emissions from electricity and paper in the supply chain that would otherwise be ignored. Similar results appear for other industries.

The researchers urge industry to use comprehensive screening tools, such as the Web site they helped to develop (http:/www.eiolca.net), which are able to analyze carbon footprints and other impacts for different economic sectors in the U.S. economy. They argue that failing to do so will lead to poor decision-making when seeking to mitigate their impact.

"A company that is looking to move toward bio-based materials may find it far more cost-effective to encourage purchases of green power in its supply chain when they look at its total supply chain carbon footprint," said Hendrickson, professor of civil and environmental engineering.


'/>"/>

Contact: Chriss Swaney
swaney@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-5776
Carnegie Mellon University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Carnegie Mellon Researcher says Chinas export trade impacts climate
2. Carnegie Mellon researchers urge development of low carbon electricity
3. Carnegie Mellon studies how climate change impacts food production
4. Carnegie Mellon develops computer model to study cell membrane dynamics
5. Carnegie Mellon researchers to curb CO2 emissions
6. Carnegie Mellon researchers create invisibiity cloak
7. Carnegie Mellon receives $1.85 million
8. Carnegie Mellon scientists develop fluorescent proteins for live cell imaging, biosensor design
9. U. Mass Medical School and Carnegie announce licensing agreements with Oxford BioMedica
10. Novel mechanism for long-term learning identified by Carnegie Mellon researchers
11. Carnegie Mellon students win contest
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:6/30/2017)... Today, American Trucking Associations announced Seeing ... and eye tracking software, became the newest member ... "Artificial intelligence and advanced sensing algorithms ... driver,s attentiveness levels while on the road.  Drivers ... fatigue and prevent potential accidents, which could lead ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... , May 23, 2017  Hunova, the first robotic gym for the ... been officially launched in Genoa, Italy . The first ... and the USA . The technology was developed ... market by the IIT spin-off Movendo Technology thanks to a 10 million ... News Release, please click: ...
(Date:5/6/2017)... , May 5, 2017 RAM ... announced a new breakthrough in biometric authentication based ... quantum mechanical properties to perform biometric authentication. These new ... semiconductor material created by Ram Group and its ... entertainment, transportation, supply chains and security. Ram Group ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/11/2017)... 11, 2017  Market researcher Kalorama Information ... article regarding the telemedicine market.  The telemedicine ... Information.  The article, "Heart and Asthma ...  used information from Kalorama Information,s Remote Patient ... Market  (Sleep, Diabetes, Vital Signs /EKG ...
(Date:8/11/2017)... ... ... Algenist continues to disrupt the skincare industry with today’s debut of GENIUS Liquid ... the key structural element skin needs to maintain its youthful appearance and Algenist is ... First to market with proprietary collagen water active , Active ...
(Date:8/10/2017)... ... August 09, 2017 , ... As a full-service marketing ... ideal customers with the right message. Their effective, cutting-edge inbound marketing strategies are ... realize how crucial the agriculture industry is,” said David Phelps, chief marketing officer ...
(Date:8/10/2017)... ... August 09, 2017 , ... ... in the clinic is here. The team at Capricor Therapeutics, Inc. utilized a ... for clinical studies. , Dr. Travis Antes, head of analytical development at ...
Breaking Biology Technology: