Navigation Links
Carnegie Mellon studies how climate change impacts food production
Date:4/21/2008

PITTSBURGHThe old adage, We are what we eat, may be the latest recipe for success when it comes to curbing the perils of global climate warming. Despite the recent popular attention to the distance that food travels from farm to plate, aka food miles, Carnegie Mellon researchers Christopher L. Weber and H. Scott Matthews argue in an upcoming article in the prestigious Environmental Science & Technology journal that it is dietary choice, not food miles, which most determines a households food-related climate impacts.

Our analysis shows that despite all the attention given to food miles, the distance that food travels is only around 11% of the average American households food-related greenhouse gas emissions, said Weber, a research professor in Carnegie Mellons department of civil and environmental engineering and engineering and public policy.

The researchers report that fruit, vegetables, meat and milk produced closer to home rack up fewer petroleum-based transport miles than foods trucked cross country to your table. Yet despite the large distances involvedthe average distance traveled for food in the U.S. is estimated at 4,000-5,000 miles the large non-energy based greenhouse gas emissions associated with producing food make food production matter much more than distance traveled.

The authors suggest that eating less red meat and/or dairy products may be a more effective way for concerned citizens to lower their food-related climate impacts. They estimate that shifting to an entirely local diet would reduce the equivalent greenhouse gas emissions as driving 1,000 miles, while changing only one day per weeks meat and dairy-based calories to chicken, fish, or vegetables would have about the same impact. Shifting entirely from an average American diet to a vegetable-based one would reduce the same emissions as 8,000 miles driven per year.

Where you get your food from is a relevant factor in family food decisions, but what you are eating - and the processes needed to make it - is much more important from a climate change perspective, said Matthews, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering and engineering and public policy at Carnegie Mellon.


'/>"/>

Contact: Chriss Swaney
swaney@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-5776
Carnegie Mellon University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Carnegie Mellon scientists develop nanogels that enable controlled delivery of carbohydrate drugs
2. Carnegie Mellon scientists investigate initial molecular mechanism that triggers neuronal firing
3. Carnegie Mellon scientist uses mass spectrometer to weigh virus particle, von Willebrand factor
4. Carnegie Mellon, Pitt Team to study psychosocial stress
5. Mellon awards Carnegie Grant for Ecological Monitoring in South Africa
6. Carnegie Mellon researchers to develop new drug delivery system
7. Carnegie Mellon students win contest
8. Novel mechanism for long-term learning identified by Carnegie Mellon researchers
9. U. Mass Medical School and Carnegie announce licensing agreements with Oxford BioMedica
10. Carnegie Mellon scientists develop fluorescent proteins for live cell imaging, biosensor design
11. Carnegie Mellon receives $1.85 million
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:2/8/2017)... 7, 2017 Report Highlights The ... from $8.3 billion in 2016 at a compound annual ... Report Includes - An overview of the global ... with data from 2015 and 2016, and projections of ... of the market on the basis of product type, ...
(Date:2/6/2017)... 2017 According to Acuity Market Intelligence, ... authorities to continue to embrace biometric and digital ... Automated Border Control (ABC) eGates and 1436 Automated ... than 163 ports of entry across the globe. ... a combined CAGR of 37%. APC Kiosks reached ...
(Date:2/2/2017)... Feb. 2, 2017  EyeLock LLC, a market leader ... white paper " What You Should Know About Biometrics ... ensuring user authenticity is a growing concern. In traditional ... users. However, traditional authentication schemes such as username/password suffer ... Biometric authentication offers an elegant solution to the problem ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/16/2017)... Feb. 16, 2017 UCHealth ( Aurora, ... LungDirect for pulmonary nodule patient management. In addition to ... a spot on the lung, UCHealth looks to improve ... data entry. Stephanie Brown, RN , ... nodule patients with an Excel spreadsheet, which was extremely ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... 2017  Champions Oncology, Inc. (NASDAQ: CSBR ... of advanced technology solutions and products to personalize the ... addition of new cohorts of PDX models to their ... expand Champions, product line in hepatocellular cancer, breast cancer, ... and non-small cell lung cancer (including EGFR mutation; ALK/ROS1 ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... Pa. , Feb. 16, 2017  Windtree ... biotechnology company focusing on developing aerosolized KL4 surfactant ... from a preclinical influenza study showed that aerosolized ... survival in a well-established preclinical animal model. The ... a growing body of evidence that supports the ...
(Date:2/16/2017)... and NEW YORK , Feb. ... near completion of their $7M Series B financing, adding ... of the $3.5M led by Mesa Verde Venture Partners ... These resources will be directed towards further accelerating commercial ... a comprehensive genomic profiling test and expanding the Paradigm ...
Breaking Biology Technology: