Navigation Links
Captive carnivores not up to wild living
Date:1/20/2008

A study by the University of Exeter has highlighted the problems of reintroducing animals to the wild for conservation projects. Published online in the journal Biological Conservation, the research highlights the low survival rates of captive carnivores that are released into their natural habitats. On average only one in three captive-born carnivores survives in the wild, with most deaths related to human activities.

Recent high-profile conservation projects have involved reintroducing wolves into the Scottish Highlands, bringing red kites back to England and reintroducing golden lion tamarins to Brazil. Most of these animals were born in captivity, with zoos playing a major role in such projects, while other schemes involve moving wild animals to new areas.

This study reviewed 45 case studies, involving 17 carnivore species, and found that only 30% of captive animals released survived. Over half the deaths were caused by humans in incidents such as shootings and car accidents. The animals were also more susceptible to starvation and disease than their wild counterparts and less able to form successful social groups.

Kristen Jule, lead author on the paper and University of Exeter PhD student, says: Animals in captivity do not usually have the natural behaviours needed for success in the wild. Their lack of hunting skills and their lack of fear towards humans, for example, are major disadvantages. We have suspected for some time that captive born animals fared less well than wild animals, but here it is finally quantified, and the extent of the problem is critical.

The research team highlights the need for these projects to be reassessed so that animals are better prepared for living in their natural environment. This could include reducing contact with humans, creating opportunities for hunting and encouraging the formation of natural social groups, while the animals are still in captivity. The research also raised the need for long-term monitoring of released animals, so that success could be measured over several years. In addition, the paper points to the need for engagement with local communities before any reintroduction, especially as most carnivore extinctions were originally caused through conflict between animals and humans.

Kristen Jule continued: Despite the problems raised in our research, I believe reintroduction projects are vital to conservation efforts. In some cases, the animals being released no longer exist in the wild because of human development or conflict. If we are to try and redress the balance, its important for us to help provide captive born animals with the opportunity to gain the skills that they will need to survive in the wild. The next step is for scientists, conservationists and animal welfare groups to develop guidelines to help captive animals prepare for a new life in the wild.


'/>"/>

Contact: Sarah Hoyle
s.hoyle@exeter.ac.uk
392-262-062
University of Exeter
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Scat sniffing dogs detecting rare California carnivores
2. Carnivores in recent study help Bergmanns rule reach the 21st century
3. New technique captures chemical reactions in a single living cell at unprecedented resolution
4. New technology illuminates protein interactions in living cells
5. Researchers examine closest living relative to primates
6. Burrowing mammals dig for a living, but how do they do that?
7. Living with lions
8. Studying component parts of living cells with carbon nanotube cellular probes
9. Living fossils have hot sex
10. Clemson scientists shed light on molecules in living cells
11. MIT creates 3-D images of living cell
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/30/2017)... , March 30, 2017  On April 6-7, 2017, ... the Genome hackathon at Microsoft,s headquarters in ... competition will focus on developing health and wellness apps ... Hack the Genome is the first hackathon ... The world,s largest companies in the genomics, tech and ...
(Date:3/30/2017)... -- Trends, opportunities and forecast in this market to ... AFIS, iris recognition, facial recognition, hand geometry, vein recognition, ... industry (government and law enforcement, commercial and retail, health ... and by region ( North America , ... , and the Rest of the World) ...
(Date:3/28/2017)... March 28, 2017 The report ... (Camera, Monitors, Servers, Storage Devices), Software (Video Analytics, VMS), ... - Global Forecast to 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the ... and is projected to reach USD 75.64 Billion by ... 2022. The base year considered for the study is ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:8/22/2017)... ... August 22, 2017 , ... ... upon patented KBioBox technology, the extended GUIDE-Seq ananlysis. KBioBox has adapted their core ... to be provide scientists with easy to understand reports, extended indel analysis, and ...
(Date:8/21/2017)... ... August 21, 2017 , ... Boston Strategic Partners, ... with Health Economics and Outcomes Research (HEOR) and ‘big data’ to provide a ... healthcare spending exceeded $3.0 trillion with nearly 1/3 spent on hospitalizations. BSP has ...
(Date:8/17/2017)... ... August 17, 2017 , ... CNA Finance Chief ... provided a research update on Aytu Bioscience and cited promising increases in the ... Soulstring, prescription rates for Natesto® have more than doubled since March of this ...
(Date:8/16/2017)... ... 2017 , ... While art and science are often thought of as two ... think. A Mesh Is Also a Snare, a group exhibition presented by the ... Klein Gallery (EKG) on August 17 and run through September 30. An opening reception ...
Breaking Biology Technology: