Navigation Links
Cancer imaging centers get £35 million boost
Date:10/24/2013

Cancer imaging is set to get a major boost from a 35 million nationwide initiative to develop cutting edge imaging technologies for basic and clinical cancer research.

Cancer Research UK and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) are together committing 35 million for five years to four separate cancer imaging centres across the country, helping to cement the UK's position as a world leader in cancer imaging research. The new initiative builds on the 50 million initial investment in October 2008.

This latest funding will bring together scientists, engineers and clinicians to develop new imaging techniques and applications which will help clinicians learn more about how tumours feed and grow, how cancer cells signal to one another, tumour blood supply, the environment surrounding tumours and molecular and genetic signatures.

The cancer imaging centres will serve as focal points of world-class research using a variety of techniques, such as optical microscopy, MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), functional MRI*, ultrasound, and PET (Positron Emission Tomography).

Dr Iain Foulkes, Cancer Research UK's executive director of strategy and research funding, said: "Imaging is an invaluable tool in the fight against cancer. Being able to see what's happening inside a patient is vitally important in understanding how treatments are working and the best ways to improve them."

Professor David Delpy, Chief Executive of the EPSRC, said: "This large investment is great news and builds upon our previous successful collaboration with Cancer Research UK. These centres will bring together many of the UK's leading scientists, engineers and clinicians interested in all aspects of imaging research, speeding up advances in new technologies and ensuring these are applied rapidly for the benefit of patients."

The four imaging centres to receive funding are at: The University of Oxford, The Institute of Cancer Research, London, a joint imaging centre between King's College London and University College London and a new collaboration between the University of Cambridge and University of Manchester.

Imaging plays a crucial role in cancer management in three main ways; as an initial assessment of the extent of the cancer at the time of diagnosis, as a tool for guiding therapy and to assess patient response to therapy.

The cancer imaging centre in Cambridge and Manchester combines cutting-edge translational research and clinical trials with state-of-the-art imaging, genomics and pre-clinical research. By combining these two locations the cancer imaging centre has access to a large patient population and vital clinical trials infrastructure.

The cancer imaging centre in Oxford aims to integrate basic research in chemistry, physics and cancer biology with imaging science to guide treatment choices for cancer patients.

The cancer imaging centre at King's College London and University College London combine cutting-edge technology development at King's College London with the genomics expertise and clinical trials as well as access to the first clinical simultaneous PET/MRI facility in the UK. The facility focuses on determining the differences in a patient's tumour and in bringing new imaging methods to the clinic.

The cancer imaging centre at The Institute of Cancer Research, London is part of the largest comprehensive Cancer Centre in Europe and will focus on enabling 'personalised' medicine for each individual patient. New imaging techniques, such as identifying an imaging 'fingerprint' of aggressive disease, will help determine which tumours have the greatest risk of progression.

Dr Iain Foulkes added: "This investment will help drive major improvements for cancer patients in the future. Research is unlocking cancer's secrets and our ability to see what is going on with cancers is essential to better diagnose, monitor and treat cancer patients."


'/>"/>

Contact: EPSRC Press Office
pressoffice@epsrc.ac.uk
01-793-444-404
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Tortoise and the hare: New drug stops rushing cancer cells, slow and steady healthy cells unharmed
2. Embryonic development protein active in cancer growth
3. BRG1 mutations confer resistance to hormones in lung cancer
4. Genetic variation in East Asians found to explain resistance to cancer drugs
5. Beyond the microscope: Identifying specific cancers using molecular analysis
6. Marshall University study may lead to new treatments for prostate cancer
7. Salk scientists open new window into how cancers override cellular growth controls
8. Penn research points to new way of preserving fertility for boys undergoing cancer treatment
9. Genetic abnormality offers diagnostic hope for childrens cancer
10. Protein jailbreak helps breast cancer cells live
11. Breast cancer risk gene discovery fast tracked by new technology
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/2/2017)... , March 2, 2017 Who risk ... lawsuits? Download the full report: https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/4313699/ ... THE FINGERPRINT SENSOR FIELD? Fingerprint sensors using capacitive ... The fingerprint sensor vendor Idex forecasts an increase of ... mobile devices and of the fingerprint sensor market between ...
(Date:2/28/2017)... 27. Februar 2017  EyeLock LLC, ein marktführendes Unternehmen ... erstklassige biometrische Lösung zur Iris-Erkennung auf der ... LTE auf dem Mobile World Congress 2017 ... in Halle 3, Stand 3E10, vorstellen. ... Qualcomm Haven™ – eine Kombination aus Hardware, ...
(Date:2/21/2017)... Ore. , Feb. 22, 2017  IBM (NYSE: ... (Avamere Health Services, Infinity Rehab, Signature Hospice, Home Health, ... will apply the power of IBM cognitive computing to ... centers. By analyzing data streaming from sensors in senior ... and environmental conditions, and obtain deeper learnings into the ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/22/2017)... Diego, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... March 21, 2017 ... ... on Kickstarter , more than tripling its goal and raising over $30,000 ... low-maintenance vertical garden that grows nutritious veggies & herbs fast, easy, and affordably, ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... ... March 21, 2017 , ... Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), an optical imaging tool ... way to track the brain’s response to acute pain in adults and infants. , ... ,” published today in the journal Neurophotonics , by SPIE, the international ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... TIKVAH, Israel , March 22, 2017 ... developer of adult stem cell technologies for neurodegenerative diseases, ... Officer, will provide an update on new developments and ... Annual Neuroscience Biopartnering and Investment Forum, being held on ... of Sciences. ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... March 22, 2017   Invitae Corporation ... information companies, today announced the availability of a ... Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) , a neuromuscular disease ... disorders among infants as well as a significant ... new test, announced during the American College of ...
Breaking Biology Technology: