Navigation Links
Calcium and reproduction go together
Date:8/22/2014

Stanford, CAEveryone's heard of the birds and the bees. But that old expression leaves out the flowers that are being fertilized. The fertilization process for flowering plants is particularly complex and requires extensive communication between the male and female reproductive cells. New research from an international team from Stanford, Regensburg, Heidelberg, and Munich, and including Carnegie's Wolf Frommer, David Ehrhardt, and Guido Grossmann reports discoveries in the chemical signaling process that guides flowering plant fertilization. It is published in Nature Communications.

Flowering plants have a double fertilization system. Grains of pollen carry the male reproductive cells. When pollen grains land on the flower's female reproductive organ, they germinate and grow towards the deeply embedded ovules via a pollen tube. After fertilization, ovules develop into seeds. What makes the process unique is that the pollen tube releases two sperm cells, one of which fuses with an egg in a process like that in animals. The other fuses with the so-called central cell to form a multi-nuclear entity that grows and provides nutrition for the developing embryo and seedling, respectively. This so-called endosperm is also the major source of nutrition for the animals and humans that eat these plants. Numerous cell-to-cell chemical interactions are necessary to guide this process as it takes place, many of which remain unidentified. In animals, calcium is key for communication between cells during fertilization. The research team, led by Thomas Dresselhaus from the University of Regensburg and Guido Grossmann, who recently moved from Carnegie to the University of Heidelberg, focused on finding calcium-facilitated communication in the double fertilization of flowering plants.

It was already known that calcium is involved in the early stages of fertilization, including pollen tube growth control and the guidance that brings the sperm to the ovule. But more work was necessary to determine if it was as important in the later stages.

Using an advanced fluorescent calcium sensor the team was able to monitor calcium signatures in live cells throughout the whole double fertilization process. The work was performed using Arabidopsis, which is commonly used for research purposes. They found that calcium was involved in chemical signaling throughout the double fertilization process and is associated, for example, with sperm release and fusion with the egg cell. This type of real-time observation had previously been impossible due to the deeply imbedded location where double fertilization occurs.

"Thanks to technical advances we were able to observe the moment of plant fertilization at the cellular level and, at the same time, listen to the 'tte--tte' between male and female cells," Grossmann said. "Further work is necessary to decode the language and understand what is actually being said."


'/>"/>

Contact: Guido Grossman
guido.grossmann@cos.uni-heidelberg.de
Carnegie Institution
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. New research suggests soluble corn fibre may boost calcium absorption
2. New data shows proprietary calcium and collagen formulation KoACT® superior for bone health
3. Cellular gates for sodium and calcium controlled by common element of ancient origin
4. Supplements of calcium and vitamin D may have too much for some older women
5. Scientists reveal details of calcium safety-valve in cells
6. Higher calcium intake may reduce body fat, mitigating genetic risk for diabetes
7. Calcium waves help the roots tell the shoots
8. Loose coupling between calcium channels and sensors
9. Johns Hopkins scientists identify a key to bodys use of free calcium
10. New book on calcium techniques from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
11. Low levels of blood calcium in dairy cows may affect cow health and productivity, MU study finds
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:8/15/2017)... Va. , Aug. 15 2017   ivWatch LLC , ... of intravenous (IV) therapy, today announced receipt of its ISO 13485 ... developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO®). ... ivWatch Model 400 Continuous Monitoring device for the ... "This is ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... first robotic gym for the rehabilitation and functional motor sense evaluation of ... Italy . The first 30 robots will be available from June ... . The technology was developed and patented at the IIT laboratories and ... thanks to a 10 million euro investment from entrepreneur Sergio Dompè. ... ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... New York , April 19, 2017 ... competitive, as its vendor landscape is marked by the ... the market is however held by five major players ... Safran. Together these companies accounted for nearly 61% of ... of the leading companies in the global military biometrics ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... Disappearing forests and increased emissions ... over 5.5 million people each year. Especially those living in larger cities are affected ... based in one of the most pollution-affected countries globally - decided to take action. ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... , ... October 10, 2017 , ... San Diego-based team ... its corporate rebranding initiative announced today. The bold new look is part of ... the company moves into a significant growth period. , It will also expand its ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... Dr. Bob Harman, founder ... local San Diego Rotary Club. The event entitled “Stem Cells and ... had 300+ attendees. Dr. Harman, DVM, MPVM was joined by two human doctors: ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... , ... October 10, 2017 , ... ... and business process optimization firm for the life sciences and healthcare industries, announces ... conference in San Francisco. , The presentation, “Automating GxP Validation for Agile Cloud ...
Breaking Biology Technology: