Navigation Links
CNIO researchers discover a new gene involved in obesity
Date:6/20/2013

The discovery of an unexpected function for a gene that was associated to another process in the organism might be a solution in search of a problem, a clue to unsuspected connections. That is what has happened with RAP1, a gene that protects telomeres the ends of chromosomesafter researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) surprisingly discovered its key role in obesity.

"We still don't know what evolutionary significance to attach to it, but it is at the very least interesting that a telomere gene is related to obesity", says Maria Blasco, CNIO director and co-author of the study published today in the journal Cell Reports.

RAP1 forms part of the shelterin complex, a group of proteins that make up the protective hood of telomeresthe DNA sequence at the ends of chromosomes that shortens with each cellular division and thus measures the ageing of the organism. There are six shelterins, and CNIO's Telomeres & Telomerase Group, which studies them in-depth, has discovered that RAP1, contrary to the rest, is not essential for the survival of the organism; but that does not mean RAP1 is not important. The reverse is rather the case: when comparing the genomes of different species, it can be observed that RAP1 is the most conserved shelterin of all. Despite the long history of evolutionary changes, RAP1 has not changed; it is present even in yeast. This normally implies an important role in the organism, but which one?

CNIO researchers had discovered that RAP1, in addition to being located in telomeres, is also present in the rest of the chromosome; they supposed it acts regulating the action of other genes. In order to analyse this other potential function, and its importance in the organism, CNIO researchers created a lineage of mice without RAP1 and, to their surprise, discovered a model for obesity.

MICE LACKING RAP1 GAIN MORE WEIGHT

"Miceespecially female micewithout RAP1 do not eat more, but do gain weight. They suffer from metabolic syndrome, accumulate abdominal fat and present high glucose and cholesterol levels, amongst other symptoms", says Paula Martínez, first-author of the study.

The reason is that RAP1 plays an important role in the regulation of genes involved in metabolism. In particular, researchers have discovered that it acts on the same signalling pathway mediated by another protein: PPAR- gamma (PPAR-γ). In fact, PPAR-γ deficient mice suffer from a type of obesity "surprisingly similar" to that seen in mice without RAP1.

The next step in the research will be to study if RAP1 also plays a role in human obesity. "This discovery adds an element to the obesity equation, and opens up a possible new link between metabolic dysfunction and ageing, via a protein present in telomeres", says Blasco.


'/>"/>

Contact: Press Office
comunicacion@cnio.es
Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas (CNIO)
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Too green to be true? Researchers develop highly effective method for converting CO2 into methanol
2. UMass Amherst researchers develop powerful new technique to study protein function
3. Saint Louis University researchers discover a way to detect new viruses
4. OU researchers collaborate on $20 million NSF EPSCoR grant
5. Researchers unearth bioenergy potential in leaf-cutter ant communities
6. Danish researchers expose new cause of life-threatening disease
7. Researchers discover how brain circuits can become miswired during development
8. U of M researchers find novel gene correction model for epidermolysis bullosa
9. CNIO researchers identify a new gene that is essential for nuclear reprogramming
10. Researchers develop a faster method to identify Salmonella strains
11. Researchers document acceleration of ocean denitrification during deglaciation
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:5/23/2017)...  Hunova, the first robotic gym for the rehabilitation and functional motor ... Genoa, Italy . The first 30 robots will be ... USA . The technology was developed and patented at the ... spin-off Movendo Technology thanks to a 10 million euro investment from entrepreneur ... ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... 2017 The global military biometrics ... marked by the presence of several large global players. ... five major players - 3M Cogent, NEC Corporation, M2SYS ... nearly 61% of the global military biometric market in ... global military biometrics market boast global presence, which has ...
(Date:4/11/2017)... BEACH GARDENS, Fla. , April 11, 2017 ... identity management and secure authentication solutions, today announced ... contract by Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) ... for IARPA,s Thor program. "Innovation has ... onset and IARPA,s Thor program will allow us ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/20/2017)... ... June 20, 2017 , ... ... PhD, a well-versed leader with extensive assay development and biomarker expertise, as VP ... is a Boston CRO specializing in bio-analytical assay development and sample testing services. ...
(Date:6/19/2017)... ... June 19, 2017 , ... As Vice ... EDETEK’s products including training, implementation, support, and client process and SOP development. , ... has previously held leadership roles for service providers and top-tier pharmaceuticals, and as ...
(Date:6/19/2017)... ... ... A colony of healthy honey bees is like a superorganism--individual bees provide ... containing nutrients necessary for growth and survival. Better nutrition gives the colony a strong ... a decline in honey bee health. Sick and weakened bees diminish the colony's resiliency, ...
(Date:6/16/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 16, 2017 , ... CTNext ... Entrepreneur Innovation Awards (EIA), held at The LOFT at Chelsea Piers in Stamford. , ... ideas to a panel of judges for an opportunity to secure $10,000 awards to ...
Breaking Biology Technology: