Navigation Links
CMU and CTC to develop robotic laser system to strip paint from aircraft
Date:11/26/2012

PITTSBURGHCarnegie Mellon University's National Robotics Engineering Center (NREC) and Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) of Johnstown, Pa., are working with the Air Force Research Laboratory and Ogden Air Logistics Center 309 AMXG to develop and demonstrate a robotic system that uses high-powered lasers to remove coatings from fighter and cargo aircraft.

In a two-year project sponsored by the National Defense Center for Energy and Environment, CTC, under Prime Contract W91ZLK-10-D-0005 with NREC as a subcontractor, will build six autonomous mobile robots, each with a laser coating remover, and deploy them to work in teams to remove paint and other coatings from aircraft at Hill Air Force Base in northern Utah.

The demonstration at Hill AFB is the latest phase of development for the Advanced Robotic Laser Coating Removal System (ARLCRS). Earlier, CTC and NREC developed a prototype of the robot, which is undergoing testing at CTC's facilities.

CTC's laser coating remover uses a continuous wave laser to strip paint and other coatings from aircraft. It replaces the abrasives or chemical paint removers used in traditional coating removal processes, which generate significant hazardous wastes and air emissions. The laser can selectively remove coatings. A custom HEPA system safely collects debris as it is removed from the aircraft, minimizing its impact on the environment.

The use of autonomous mobile robots developed at NREC makes it possible to automate and precisely control the stripping process, while protecting workers' eyes from hazardous laser light. The robots work in teams, with the size of each team varying based on the size of the aircraft. The robots keep the laser beam properly angled against the aircraft skin, adjusting to the shape of each area of the airframe. The robots also control the speed of the beam over the surface to ensure that it is slow enough to ensure complete stripping, but not so slow tha
'/>"/>

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University
Source:Eurekalert  

Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Inspired: Canada funds 68 bold, inventive ways to improve health, save lives in developing countries
2. Stem cells develop best in 3-D
3. Researchers develop guidebook for promoting healthy lifestyles among Hispanic populations
4. Streams show signs of degradation at earliest stages of urban development
5. UConn receives Grand Challenges Explorations Grant for research in global health and development
6. Watching the developing brain, scientists glean clues on neurological disorder
7. High Brightness Tetrapod Quantum Dots Developed
8. Cilia guide neuronal migration in developing brain
9. Southampton to help develop new crops for water-stressed environments
10. Gannets could be affected by offshore energy developments
11. Ben-Gurion University team in prestigious DARPA Robotics Challenge to develop disaster response robot
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
CMU and CTC to develop robotic laser system to strip paint from aircraft
(Date:9/18/2014)... 18, 2014 New research into the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic ... severe hemorrhagic disease in humans similar to that caused ... CCHFV infection. This discovery has the potential to lead ... , The research, reported in a paper ... and conducted by scientists at the Texas Biomedical Research ...
(Date:9/18/2014)... times it,s demonstrated, it,s still hard to envision ... by using a signaling system called "quorum sensing," ... suit their population. In short, some bacteria "know" ... accordingly. , Once the population of quorum-sensing bacteria ... to pathogenic, or from unhelpful to helpful. The ...
(Date:9/18/2014)... built the first smartphone app that automatically reveals ... In other words, your smartphone knows your state ... and how that affects you. , The StudentLife ... loneliness to their academic performance, also may be ... to monitor mental health, trigger intervention and improve ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Research milestone in CCHF virus could help identify new treatments 2Researchers study vital 'on/off switches' that control when bacteria turn deadly 2Researchers study vital 'on/off switches' that control when bacteria turn deadly 3New Dartmouth smartphone app reveals users' mental health, performance, behavior 2New Dartmouth smartphone app reveals users' mental health, performance, behavior 3New Dartmouth smartphone app reveals users' mental health, performance, behavior 4
... international consortium of researchers led by Universitat Autnoma de ... studies the clinical impact of the mutations. , The ... and world distribution of some of the most frequent ... thousands of years ago and later migrated to America. ...
... A pathway whereby bacteria communicate with each other has ... Jerusalem. The discovery has important implications for efforts to ... body. Bacteria are known to communicate in nature ... molecules, said Prof. Sigal Ben-Yehuda of the Institute for ...
... device may help clinicians improve a promising cancer therapy ... such diseases as metastatic melanoma, non-Hodgkin,s lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic ... T cell transfer, has shown encouraging results in clinical ... T cells from a cancer patient, multiplying them in ...
Cached Biology News:New advances in genetic studies of Fanconi anemia patients 2Researchers predict age of T cells to improve cancer treatment 2Researchers predict age of T cells to improve cancer treatment 3
(Date:9/19/2014)... , September 19, 2014 The new ... Spain , available today on PharmaBoardroom.com for ... Eurozone crisis that rocked the Spanish economy in 2009, and ... pharma community has remained pragmatic in times of trouble. ... still the fifth biggest European market, and the general conditions ...
(Date:9/18/2014)... A novel robotic system that can operate ... being tested as part of a biomedical research partnership ... the aim of determining if the robot, in conjunction ... faster, more accurate, less costly, and less discomforting for ... to deliver prostate cancer therapies with greater precision. , ...
(Date:9/18/2014)... , Sept. 18, 2014 Research and ... "Global and Chinese Stem Cell Industry Report, 2014-2017" ... are undifferentiated biological cells that can differentiate into specialized ... stem cells. Stem cell therapy can be applied to ... system disease), nervous system diseases, damage or lesion of ...
(Date:9/18/2014)... 2014  U.S. biotech company Kultevat has ... for technology developed by the Donald Danforth Plant ... including for applications in production of natural rubber in ... was developed under the direction of Roger Beachy ... president of the Danforth Plant Science Center, and is ...
Breaking Biology Technology:PharmaBoardroom Releases New Spain Pharmaceuticals Report 2PharmaBoardroom Releases New Spain Pharmaceuticals Report 3Worcester Polytechnic Institute Participates in Clinical Trial for MRI-Compatible Robot Designed to Improve Accuracy of Prostate Cancer Biopsies 2Worcester Polytechnic Institute Participates in Clinical Trial for MRI-Compatible Robot Designed to Improve Accuracy of Prostate Cancer Biopsies 3Worcester Polytechnic Institute Participates in Clinical Trial for MRI-Compatible Robot Designed to Improve Accuracy of Prostate Cancer Biopsies 4Worcester Polytechnic Institute Participates in Clinical Trial for MRI-Compatible Robot Designed to Improve Accuracy of Prostate Cancer Biopsies 5Worcester Polytechnic Institute Participates in Clinical Trial for MRI-Compatible Robot Designed to Improve Accuracy of Prostate Cancer Biopsies 6Global and Chinese Stem Cell Industry Report, 2014-2017 2Global and Chinese Stem Cell Industry Report, 2014-2017 3Kultevat obtains license of gene switch technology 2
... male flies of a serious agricultural pest, the medfly, have ... still embryos. Researchers writing in the open access journal ... when released into a wild population, could out-compete the normal ... stillborn protecting important crops. , Ernst A. Wimmer from ...
... GPRO ) announced today that the Company ... results on Tuesday, February 17, 2009 at,approximately 4:00 p.m. ... conference call at 4:30 p.m. ET. Hank Nordhoff, chairman ... finance, and,chief financial officer, will host the call. , ...
... 26 BioLife Solutions, Inc.,(OTC Bulletin Board: ... proprietary,GMP hypothermic storage and cryopreservation media products ... launch of its new quarterly,newsletter BioPreservation Today, ... protocols and processes, to maximize the yield ...
Cached Biology Technology:Gene-engineered flies are pest solution 2Gen-Probe Announces Webcast of Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2008 Earnings Conference Call 2BioLife Solutions Launches BioPreservation Today(R) Industry Newsletter 2BioLife Solutions Launches BioPreservation Today(R) Industry Newsletter 3
Request Info...
Agarose-LE, 250 g. Suitable for soft agarose cloning. Nuclease-free.Gel point (1.5%): 36 1.5 C, EEO (-mr): 1200 g/cm2. Category: Nucleotides & Enzymes & Biochemicals, Ultrapure Biochemicals ....
Request Info...
Agarose-LE, 500 g. Suitable for soft agarose cloning. Nuclease-free.Gel point (1.5%): 36 1.5 C, EEO (-mr): 1200 g/cm2. Category: Nucleotides & Enzymes & Biochemicals, Ultrapure Biochemicals ....
Biology Products: