Navigation Links
CCNY researchers study scientific collaboration in age of internet
Date:10/15/2009

Collaboration has long been recognized as essential to the advancement of scientific knowledge. While the nature of co-production of knowledge in collaborative settings has been studied for some time, little is known about how the process works in collaborations established and maintained through virtual organizations.

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at The City College of New York (CCNY) is studying how virtual organizations, where people work in different locations, sometime halfway around the world, change and affect the production of scientific knowledge. They are supported by a new grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) of $368,210 over three years. The investigators hope to identify the conditions under which virtual organizations can enable and enhance scientific production and innovation.

"It used to be that collaboration took place mainly within one laboratory, but now you can collaborate with people you don't even know, said Dr. Maria Binz-Scharf, Assistant Professor of Management in the Economics Department at CCNY and Principal Investigator of the project. "The question is: How does greater access to shared data, new collaborators and information across time and space help improve the production of scientific knowledge, if at all?"

The CCNY team includes, in addition to Professor Binz-Scharf, Dr. Leslie Paik, Assistant Professor of Sociology and the project's co-Principal Investigator, and Dr. Avrom Caplan, Professor of Biology and Associate University Dean for Research. They will focus their research on biologists, Dean Caplan among them, who study molecular chaperones, which are proteins that are part of a process called cellular quality control that promotes destruction of damaged proteins.

"It's a fairly well-defined area with around active 300 researchers worldwide, so it is an ideal network to study," Professor Binz-Scharf explained.

The investigation is being conducted in three stages. In the first stage, Professors Binz-Scharf and Paik will conducted an ethnographic study of Dean Caplan's lab and those of three scientists he collaborates with. They will observe the scientists at work and ask questions about their work. They will attend "virtual" meetings with collaborators, go through a typical work day with different scientists in the laboratory, and observe scientists work together in the laboratory (as well as across different laboratories).

The findings of this stage will be used to develop a questionnaire for use in a social network analysis of all 300 or so scientists in the field. In the final stage, a select group of the scientists will be interviewed in depth to determine whether their statements corroborate the data collected through the survey and the ethnographic observations.

"We not only want to see how scientists work, but question assumptions about how new technology improves the ways scientists collaborate," said Professor Paik. "We want to see how the way science works is changing because of new technology."

While technology can facilitate collaboration on a global scale, it remains to be seen whether it can overcome the human barriers, Professor Binz-Scharf noted. "In the end, it's all about people having to come together and negotiate a social contract."

The researchers hope to produce guidelines that can be applied to promote and maintain productive collaborations, she added. "We are looking at a specific field with specific norms, but we expect that many of the principles can be applied to virtual collaborations in other areas, including the social sciences."


'/>"/>

Contact: Ellis Simon
esimon@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-6460
City College of New York
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Researchers identify proteins involved in new neurodegenerative syndrome
2. Texas researchers and educators head for Antarctica
3. MGH researchers describe new way to identify, evolve novel enzymes
4. University of Pennsylvania researchers develop formula to gauge risk of disease clusters
5. U of MN researchers discover noninvasive diagnostic tool for brain diseases
6. U of Minnesota researchers discover noninvasive diagnostic tool for brain diseases
7. Researchers discover new strategies for antibiotic resistance
8. Researchers find new taste in fruit flies: carbonated water
9. Binghamton University researchers investigate evolving malaria resistance
10. UIC researchers find promising new targets for antibiotics
11. Researchers develop simple method to create natural drug products
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:12/15/2016)... 15, 2016 Advancements in biometrics ... wellness and wellbeing (HWW), and security of ... new passenger vehicles begin to feature fingerprint ... heart beat monitoring, brain wave monitoring, stress ... and pulse detection. These will be driven ...
(Date:12/12/2016)... , Dec. 12, 2016  Researchers at ... possibilities for graphene by combining the material with ... highly sensitive pressure detector able to sense pulse, ... a small spider.  The research ... can be read here:  http://science.sciencemag.org/content/354/6317/1257 ...
(Date:12/7/2016)... PUNE, India , December 7, 2016 According to ... NLP, Machine Learning), Software Tool (Facial Expression, Voice Recognition), Service, Application Area, End ... size is estimated to grow from USD 6.72 Billion in 2016 to USD ... Continue Reading ... ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/21/2017)... ... 2017 , ... G&L Scientific Inc, a leading provider of ... has announced the opening of new offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts, strengthening and improving ... is the latest step in G&L’s expansion of its global clinical consulting services ...
(Date:1/21/2017)... -- Bioptix, Inc. (Nasdaq: BIOP ... 14, 2017 the Board of Directors of the Company ... certain employees associated with the September 2016 acquisition of ... on January 16, 2017 and terminations are expected to ... severance benefits in certain circumstances of up to one ...
(Date:1/20/2017)... Stock-Callers.com explores the Biotech industry ... most recent performances of select equities. In this morning,s ... ), Abeona Therapeutics Inc. (NASDAQ: ABEO ), ... Sage Therapeutics Inc. (NASDAQ: SAGE ). According ... global Biotech market size is expected to reach $604.40 billion by 2020 due ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... 2017 Research and Markets has announced the ... Cancer Type, Application - Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2014-2022" ... ... market is projected to reach $15,737 million by 2022 from $6,521 ... 2022. Omic technologies segment accounted for more than ...
Breaking Biology Technology: