Navigation Links
Brown-led team offers first look at how bats land
Date:3/20/2009

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] People have always been fascinated by bats, but the scope of that interest generally is limited to how bats fly and their bizarre habit of sleeping upside down. Until now, no one had studied how bats arrive at their daytime perches.

A Brown University-led research team is the first to document the landing approaches of three species of bats two that live in caves and one that roosts in trees. What they found was surprising: Not all bats land the same way.

"Hanging upside down is what bats do," said Daniel Riskin, a postdoctoral researcher in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology department at Brown and lead author on a paper published in the Journal of Experimental Biology. "We've known this. But this is the first time anyone has measured how they land."

VIDEO: A Brown University-led research team for the first time has caught on film how bats land. Their findings were surprising: tree-roosting bats execute a different landing maneuver than cave-dwelling species....

Click here for more information.

heir findings were surprising: tree-roosting bats execute a different landing maneuver than cave-dwelling species....
Click here for more information.

Using sophisticated motion capture cameras in a special flight enclosure, the team filmed each species of bat as it swooped toward a latticed landing pad and landed on it. Cynopterus brachyotis, a tree-roosting bat common in tropical parts of southeast Asia, executed a half-backflip as it swooped upward to the landing site, landing as its hind legs and thumbs touched the pad simultaneously a four-point landing, the group observed.

The landing is hard, Riskin noted, with an impact force more than four times the species' body weight.

The team then turned its attention to two cave-roosting species, Carollia perspicillata and Glossophaga soricina. These bats, common in Central and South America, approach their landing target with a vertical pitch and then, at the last instant, yaw to the left or to the right executing a cartwheel of sorts before grasping the landing pad with just their hind legs.

The two-point landing is much gentler than the impact force exerted by the tree-roosting bats, the researchers observed; the cave-roosting bats have a landing impact force of just one-third of their body weight.

There are about 1,200 recognized bat species worldwide, so Riskin was cautious about not drawing any grand conclusions. Still, he said, the fact that the team has documented that bats land differently could open new insights into a species that makes up roughly one-fifth of all mammals on earth.

"It's opening the door to how bats evolved," Riskin said. "You can say that bats have been hanging upside down since they first evolved, and it has probably been one of the keys to their worldwide success."


'/>"/>

Contact: Richard Lewis
Richard_Lewis@Brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. New partnership offers outsourced R&D in membrane biology
2. Census of protein architectures offers new view of history of life
3. NAS report offers new tools to assess health risks from chemicals
4. New class of drug offers hope to treatment-resistant AIDS patients
5. Darwin Symposium at Field Museum offers broad overview of his science and its impact
6. Conference on healthspan offers new opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration
7. Protein controls blood vessel formation, offers new drug target
8. Genetic breakthrough offers promise in tackling kidney tumors
9. New research offers prioritization plan for reducing nutrient pollution in feeder streams
10. Intellifit(R) Offers Custom-Made Jeans with a High-Tech Twist
11. New dinosaur from Mexico offers insights into ancient life on West America
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Brown-led team offers first look at how bats land
(Date:2/5/2016)... , Feb. 5, 2016 ... of the "Global Facial Recognition Market ... --> http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/5kvw8m/global_facial ) has announced the ... Market 2016-2020" report to their offering. ... http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/5kvw8m/global_facial ) has announced the addition of ...
(Date:2/3/2016)... 3, 2016 Vigilant Solutions announces today that ... Missouri solved two recent hit-and-run ... data from Vigilant Solutions. Brian Wenberg ... the victim was walking out of a convenience store and witnessed an elderly ... his vehicle, striking his vehicle and leaving the scene.  ...
(Date:2/2/2016)... Feb. 2, 2016 Checkpoint Inhibitors for ... Market Are you interested in the future ... for checkpoint inhibitors. Visiongain,s report gives those predictions ... and national level. Avoid falling behind in ... opportunities and revenues those emerging cancer therapies can ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/10/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... expansion to their comprehensive training and support program, Sonalink™ remote monitoring. The inaugural ... procedures performed on Friday, February 5th, connecting Dr. Samuel Peretsman to a HIFU ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... ... now available on Microsoft Azure. On Azure, Arvados provides capabilities for managing and ... clear demand for Microsoft Azure from major institutions collecting and analyzing genomic data,” ...
(Date:2/10/2016)... CA (PRWEB) , ... February 10, 2016 , ... Cenna ... agents for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, announced today it has been selected to ... 18th at the Breakers in Palm Beach, Florida. The purpose of the Forum ...
(Date:2/9/2016)... ... 2016 , ... With a presidential election in November and the future of ... together over 500 top healthcare leaders for a night and day of debates and ... MBA students of the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, will be held February 18 ...
Breaking Biology Technology: