Navigation Links
Breastfeeding promotes healthy growth
Date:12/20/2011

A PhD project from LIFE the Faculty of Life Sciences at the University of Copenhagen has shown that breastfed children follow a different growth pattern than non-breastfed children. Breastfeeding lowers the levels of the growth hormones IGF-I and insulin in the blood, which means that growth is slightly slower. This is believed to reduce the risk of overweight and diabetes later in life.

The PhD project is part of SKOT, a large-scale Danish study of small children, diet and wellbeing, which has followed and examined 330 healthy children at 9, 18 and 36 months.

The SKOT project is to increase our knowledge of what Danish children eat in the critical phase when they move from breastmilk or formula to solids. The transition is critical because the food intake during this period has a significant bearing on the child's growth and risk of developing lifestyle diseases later in life.

PhD Anja Lykke Madsen has gathered the first results of the SKOT study in her PhD project.

"We can see that breastfeeding has a significant, measurable effect on the important growth regulators in the blood, IGF-I and insulin. The more times the child was breastfed, the lower the hormone levels. This suggests that the child has a slightly lower risk of becoming overweight later in childhood. At the same time, there was a correlation between how long the children were breastfed and their weight at 18 months," says LIFE PhD Anja Lykke Madsen.

Mother's milk for healthy growth:

According to Professor Kim Fleischer Michaelsen from LIFE, head of the SKOT project, the study provides valuable knowledge about the factors affecting the early onset of obesity.

"It is well-known that children who are breastfed grow slightly more slowly than children who are given formula, and it looks as if this growth pattern is optimal because it reduces the risk of developing lifestyle diseases later in life. However, the new results from SKOT show that breastfeeding also affects levels of IGF-I and insulin at 9 months, i.e. at a time when the children are well into eating solids," says Professor Kim Fleischer Michaelsen from LIFE. He continues:

"Looking at the children's growth up to 18 months identified a number of interesting correlations which may improve our understanding of the mechanisms behind early-onset obesity. The longer the children were breastfed, the lower their weight at 18 months. It's as simple as that."

The study also showed that the longer the children slept, the smaller their waist circumference. Moreover, the children of mothers who gained lot of weight during pregnancy had a slightly thicker layer of subcutaneous fat than the children of mothers who put on less weight.

Need to study long-term effects:

Kim Fleischer Michaelsen stresses the need to follow up and to continue to examine the children to establish the long-term effects, while also looking at correlations in other studies.


'/>"/>
Contact: PhD Anja Lykke Madsen
alm@life.ku.dk
01-145-424-05234
University of Copenhagen
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Benefits of breastfeeding outweigh risk of infant exposure to environmental chemicals in breastmilk
2. Facebook flack regarding breastfeeding mothers
3. Fast-food diet cancels out benefits of breastfeeding in preventing asthma
4. Breastfeeding duration and weaning diet may shape childs body composition
5. Dioxins in food chain linked to breastfeeding ills
6. Clinical study supports benefit of breastfeeding support for obese women
7. Giving DHA supplements to breastfeeding mothers
8. About 94 percent of breastfeeding mothers do not follow a proper diet
9. Black mothers cite lack of desire as top reasons for not breastfeeding
10. New public health goals tackle obstacles to breastfeeding success
11. Breastfeeding tied to stronger maternal response to babys cry
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/22/2016)... 2016 According to ... for Consumer Industry by Type (Image, Motion, Pressure, ... & IT, Entertainment, Home Appliances, & Wearable ... 2022", published by MarketsandMarkets, the market for ... USD 26.76 Billion by 2022, at a ...
(Date:3/21/2016)... -- Unique technology combines v ...   Xura, Inc. (NASDAQ: ... communications services, today announced it is working alongside SpeechPro ... particularly those in the Financial Services Sector, the ability ... a mobile app, alongside, and in combination with, traditional ...
(Date:3/17/2016)... , March 17, 2016 ABI Research, ... forecasts the global biometrics market will reach more ... 118% increase from 2015. Consumer electronics, particularly smartphones, ... fingerprint sensors anticipated to reach two billion shipments ... Dimitrios Pavlakis , Research Analyst at ABI ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/25/2016)... New Haven, Connecticut (PRWEB) , ... May 25, ... ... today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted the company’s ... This is the company’s second orphan drug designation granted by the FDA. ...
(Date:5/24/2016)... , ... May 24, 2016 , ... Last week, Callan ... corporate executives and entrepreneurs, held The Future of San Diego Life Science event at ... Diego life science community attended the event with speakers Dr. Rich Heyman, former CEO ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... ... May 23, 2016 , ... PrecisionAg® Media has ... 2017 and Beyond. The paper outlines the key trends that are creating both ... “We’ve witnessed a lot of highs and lows as the precision agriculture market ...
(Date:5/23/2016)... , May 23, 2016 - Leading CRO,s ... - Frontage Implement a Single Platform to Manage End-to-end ... Traceability Within the Bioanalytical lab Frontage Laboratories, a full-service ... States and China , has selected ... facilities. In addition to serving as the global electronic lab notebook ...
Breaking Biology Technology: