Navigation Links
Brain size and a trip to Disneyland
Date:11/15/2010

Evidence from Disneyland suggests that human creativity may have evolved not in response to sexual selection as some scientists believe but as a way to help parents bond with their children and to pass on traditions and cultural knowledge, a new study published in the inaugural issue of the International Journal of Tourism Anthropology suggests.

Evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miller of the University of New Mexico has suggested that human creativity, storytelling, humor, wit, music, fantasy, and morality, all evolved as forms of courtship behavior. He used evidence drawn from the Southern California tourist industry to underpin his argument. The work offers an explanation as to why the human brain is so much bigger relative to body size than that of other apes - sexual selection for greater intellect. Intriguingly, Miller has referred to the mind as "amusement park".

Now, anthropologists Craig Palmer of the University of Missouri, Columbia, and Kathryn Coe of the University of Arizona beg to differ. Although Miller talks of the mind in such terms, he fails to include in his analysis the most famous amusement park in the world, Disneyland. Palmer and Coe suggest that this is one of the most dense concentrations in the world of exactly those aspects of culture - art, creativity, storytelling, humor, wit, music, fantasy, and morality - that Miller claims evolved as courtship displays.

Writing in the IJTA, Palmer and Coe suggest that Miller's hypothesis cannot account for the fact that Disneyland is fundamentally devoted to children. They reason that Disneyland and other similar amusement parks, support an alternative hypothesis that the creative aspects of the human brain may have evolved in the context of parents influencing their offspring, and offspring responding to their parents, not in the context of courtship.

The researchers do concede that some tourism is related to courtship, and not just "honeymoon" tourism and that it often involves art, creativity, storytelling, humor, wit, music, fantasy, and morality as part of the attractions. The team argues, however, that "The brain circuitry involved in both the generation of, and response to, these traits was selected for because it enabled parents to increase their fitness by increasing their ability to influence their offspring." The human brain increased in size through evolution as cultural traditions accumulated over numerous generations. "Traditions can last much longer than a generation or two and that the massive accumulation of traditional behavior is unique to our species as is the large brain," the team concludes.


'/>"/>

Contact: Craig Palmer
palmerct@missouri.edu
Inderscience Publishers
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Where did you get those eyes and that brain?
2. Technology developed at Queens University allows medical workers to better assess brain injuries
3. Bat brains offer clues as to how we focus on some sounds and not others
4. Caltech scientists describe the delicate balance in the brain that controls fear
5. Trojan Horse ploy to sneak protective drug into brains of stroke patients
6. The brains of Neanderthals and modern humans developed differently
7. Scientists discover how the songbirds brain controls timing during singing
8. PET scans reveal estrogen-producing hotspots in human brain
9. Study provides treatment hope for long term effects of brain trauma
10. New Brain Connectivity journal captures latest advances in neuroscience research
11. Mouse brain seen in sharpest detail ever
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/22/2016)... PROVO and SANDY, Utah ... (NSO), which operates the highest sample volume laboratory in ... Tute Genomics and UNIConnect, leaders in clinical sequencing informatics ... the launch of a project to establish the informatics ... NSO has been contracted by the ...
(Date:3/18/2016)... 18, 2016 --> ... ICT, Manned & Unmanned Vehicles, Physical infrastructure and Perimeter Surveillance ... in the border security market and the continuing migration crisis ... Europe has led visiongain to publish this ... --> defence & security companies in the ...
(Date:3/15/2016)... ALBANY, New York , March 15, 2016 ... a new market report published by Transparency Market Research "Digital ... Growth, Trends and Forecast 2015 - 2023," the global digital ... at US$ 731.9 Mn in 2014 and is forecast to ... to 2023. Growth of micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... 27, 2016 , ... Weeks after hosting a carpal tunnel syndrome workshop with ... surgeon and founder of the Fitzmaurice Hand Institute, has announced the addition of MRI ... state-of-the-art technology and only 1 of about 3 currently available in the United States. ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... ... ... Doctors in Italy, Japan, the UK and the US have reached some surprising ... its link to malignant mesothelioma. Surviving Mesothelioma has just posted the details of their ... , The studies analyzed for the new report included more than 3,447 cancer patients. ...
(Date:5/27/2016)... At present, the Biotech sphere is in a ... volatility is what makes this industry interesting to consider. Here ... (NASDAQ: SNTA ), CTI BioPharma Corp. (NASDAQ: ... and Heat Biologics Inc. (NASDAQ: HTBX ). Sign ... these stocks at: http://www.activewallst.com/register/ ...
(Date:5/26/2016)... New Jersey and READING, ... Indegene ( http://www.indegene.com ), a leading ... to life science, pharmaceutical and healthcare organisations and ... of innovative scientific support throughout the product lifecycle, ... with the launch of IntraScience.      ...
Breaking Biology Technology: