Navigation Links
Bladder function restored in animals with severe spinal cord injury
Date:6/26/2013

For the first time, researchers have restored significant bladder function through nerve regeneration in rats with the most severe spinal cord injuries (SCI). The breakthrough paired a traditional nerve bridge graft with a novel combination of scar degrading and growth factor treatments to grow new nerve cells from the thoracic level to the lower spinal cord region. Details of the discovery appear in the June 26 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

Neuroscientists from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Cleveland Clinic built a regeneration bridge across a lesion in animals with complete gap transections of their spinal cords. Although the animals did not regain the ability to walk, the procedure did allow them to recover a strong level of bladder control.

Jerry Silver, PhD, professor of neurosciences at the School of Medicine, and Yu-Shang Lee, PhD, assistant staff scientist in the Lerner Research Institute of Cleveland Clinic, created the bridge using a scaffold of multiple segments of the animals' own peripheral nerves. Key to the regeneration was surrounding the graft and both spinal cord stumps with a stimulating growth factor and an enzyme to dissolve scar tissue, which inhibits the nerve fibers from crossing over the bridge and traveling down the spinal cord.

"While urinary control is complex and recovery took several months, it was clear that this primitive function lost to spinal cord injury does possess the capacity to rewire itself, even when a relatively small number of axons are regenerated," Silver said.

The spinal cord's role in bladder function is critical, as it relays information between the brain and body. After suffering SCI, urinary dysfunction occurs. The loss of control happens because the axons, or nerve fibers which transmit information from neuron to neuron, are disconnected from the brain stem where the body's urination commands reside.

The creation of the neural bridge, which spans the open cavity between the severed ends of the spinal cord, kills the axons that normally reside within the nerve. However, the glial cells of the bridge, called Schwann cells, which form an aligned growth promoting pathway, remain alive in the nerve and encourage the severed nearby axons in the spinal cord to enter the bridge and regrow.

Establishing functional regeneration across the gap and down the rats' spinal cord presented challenges. The first obstacle was coaxing the regenerating axons to enter and transcend the bridge. Then the axons had to grow well beyond the bridge and form connections capable of relaying nerve signals once they arrived at their destination approximately two centimeters down the spinal cord.

To achieve these results, Silver and Lee added Fibroblast Growth Factor to help align the Schwann cells in the graft with the scar tissue cells at the bridge's interfaces. Next, they injected an enzyme called chondroitinase to break down inhibitory molecules that often form in scar tissue and curtail regeneration at both ends of the bridge.

"We were especially surprised and excited to discover that once a permissive environment was created, a subset of neurons situated largely within the brainstem, which play important roles in bladder function, slowly re-grew lengthy axons far down the cord," said Dr. Silver.

The model is highly relevant to people with a complete SCI, a total loss of function below the lesion, referred to as an A grade in the American Spinal Injury Association's impairment scale. The Cleveland-based team's work offers hope that the approach ultimately could translate to restoration of bodily functions for paralyzed humans.

"The future challenge will be to optimize the technique and further increase the intrinsic growth potential of these special neurons to facilitate more substantial and rapid axonal regeneration not only after acute but also after chronic SCI," Lee said.

Silver and Lee are planning on testing the technique in larger animal models before moving to human clinical trials in the U.S.

This breakthrough follows several other significant successes from the Silver Laboratory. In 2011, the team successfully restored breathing in rats with SCI. In 2006, they used the same bridging technique to restore movement in the paw of paralyzed rats.


'/>"/>

Contact: Jessica Studeny
jessica.studeny@case.edu
216-368-4692
Case Western Reserve University
Source:Eurekalert

Related biology news :

1. Gallbladder shown as potential stem cell source for regenerative liver and metabolic disease
2. Cichlid fish: How does the swim bladder affect hearing?
3. UC Davis researchers develop new drug delivery system for bladder cancer using nanoparticles
4. Bone marrow cells used in bladder regeneration
5. Novel treatment approach for bladder pain using a herpes simplex virus vector reported
6. CWRU spinoff ConservoCare gets licensing options to develop medical device for bladder control
7. Genetic alterations linked with bladder cancer risk, recurrence, progression, and patient survival
8. AACR news: Little molecule makes big difference in bladder cancer metastasis
9. Study demonstrates cells can acquire new functions through transcriptional regulatory network
10. Has modern science become dysfunctional?
11. Second-generation drug used for hypertension aids heart function independent of blood pressure
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
(Date:3/24/2017)... -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of ... - Industry Forecast to 2025" report to their offering. ... The Global Biometric Vehicle ... around 15.1% over the next decade to reach approximately $1,580 million ... estimates and forecasts for all the given segments on global as ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... 21, 2017 Vigilant Solutions , a ... enforcement agencies, announced today the appointment of retired FBI ... public safety business development. Mr. Sheridan brings ... including a focus on the aviation transportation sector, to ... position, Mr. Sheridan served as the Aviation Liaison Agent ...
(Date:3/9/2017)... , Australia , March 9, ... study data at the prestigious World Lung Imaging Workshop ... Andreas Fouras , was invited to deliver the ... pulmonary medicine. This globally recognised event brings together leaders ... share the latest developments in lung imaging. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... The AMA is happy ... school graduates from across the nation. The scholarships are created through funds donated by ... , Scholarship criteria are set by the AMA Scholarship Committee, which is made up ...
(Date:4/21/2017)... ... April 21, 2017 , ... Frederick ... a range of emerging technology-based businesses, recently earned a $77,518 grant from the ... , Founded in 2004, FITCI is Frederick’s first incubator. A non-profit corporation, FITCI ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... TX; Ultrecht, Netherlands (PRWEB) , ... April 20, ... ... Qafis Biometrics Technology today announced their strategic partnership to offer a full ... digital identity authentication, a comprehensive suite of biometric products and the ground-breaking proactive ...
(Date:4/20/2017)... ... ... USDM Life Sciences , the leading risk management, technological innovation and ... announce Holger Braemer as Vice President of its Europe division and Managing ... , Braemer is an integral part of USDM’s expansion of services and solutions for ...
Breaking Biology Technology: