Navigation Links
Bioengineer studying how to send drugs to lungs through nanotechnology
Date:1/23/2013

A UT Arlington bioengineering researcher has teamed with a UT Southwestern colleague to develop a nanoparticle drug delivery system that will help stimulate lung growth and function after partial lung removal or destructive lung disease.

Kytai Nguyen, an associate professor of bioengineering, is working on the drug-delivery portion of the project, which is funded through a $3.4 million National Institutes of Health grant through 2016. Nguyen's work will be underwritten by $440,000 of the larger grant.

"We will introduce drugs through inhaled nanoparticles that will stimulate lung growth and remodeling following partial lung removal," said Nguyen, who joined UT Arlington's College of Engineering in 2005 and holds a joint appointment with UT Southwestern Medical Center of Dallas.

"We will synthesize biocompatible, biodegradable polymers that will encapsulate, or load, and release the drugs where needed."

The polymer used to house the drugs will degrade with time, allowing the drugs to be released within the lung. Various polymers can be used to control this drug-release time. Magnetic or fluorescent labels may be incorporated into the nanoparticles as tracers initially, but omitted in final therapeutic formulations.

Connie Hsia, a professor of Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern will direct the overall project. She said that once the drugs are delivered via nanoparticles, the research team would be able to measure therapeutic response using non-invasive imaging, physiological testing, and detailed structural analysis.

"This research is important because currently there is no definitive cure for most destructive lung diseases except transplantation," Hsia said. "We have shown that partial lung removal may trigger regrowth of the remaining lung to compensate for the loss. Using nanoparticle as a vehicle for delivery of therapeutic compounds, we hope to amplify the lung's innate potential for regrowth."

Nguyen and Hsia hope their work will lead to better quality of life for people who have had a part of their lungs removed by surgery or destroyed by disease.

Nguyen has studied how physical and biological factors influence the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, a condition that can lead to heart disease. She also has conducted research using focused laser beams called optical tweezers in nanoparticle-cell manipulation with Samarendara Mohanty, a UT Arlington associate physics professor.

Nguyen's work is representative of the research under way at The University of Texas at Arlington, a comprehensive undergraduate and graduate institution of nearly 33,000 students in the heart of North Texas. Visit www.uta.edu to learn more.


'/>"/>

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington
Source:Eurekalert  

Related biology news :

1. Bioengineered marine algae expands environments where biofuels can be produced
2. Stanford bioengineer Christina Smolke wins NIH Directors Pioneer Award
3. Investigation of American Oriental Bioengineering, Inc. by Securities Lawyers at Goldfarb LLP Law Firm for Potential Shareholder Claim
4. U of M to lead international virtual institute studying climatic and human effects on Earth
5. Studying sex differences in autism focus of $15 million NIH award to Yale center
6. Genetic research develops tools for studying diseases, improving regenerative treatment
7. Seizures linked to surgery drugs can be prevented by anesthetics, U of T team finds
8. The role of stem cells in developing new drugs
9. Study suggests caution and further studies on drugs used to treat macular degeneration
10. Mosquito virus could lead to new vaccines and drugs
11. Getting (drugs) under your skin
Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
Related Image:
Bioengineer studying how to send drugs to lungs through nanotechnology
(Date:6/22/2016)... ANGELES , June 22, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... identity management and verification solutions, has partnered ... edge software solutions for Visitor Management, Self-Service ... provides products that add functional enhancements ... partnership provides corporations and venues with an ...
(Date:6/15/2016)... New York , June 15, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... a new market report titled "Gesture Recognition Market by ... and Forecast, 2016 - 2024". According to the report, ... USD 11.60 billion in 2015 and is estimated ... reach USD 48.56 billion by 2024.  ...
(Date:6/2/2016)... LONDON , June 2, 2016 ... has awarded the 44 million US Dollar project, ... Security Embossed Vehicle Plates including Personalization, Enrolment, and IT Infrastructure ... world leader in the production and implementation of Identity Management ... in January, however Decatur was selected ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... STACS DNA Inc., the ... at the Arkansas State Crime Laboratory, has joined STACS DNA as a Field Application ... team,” said Jocelyn Tremblay, President and COO of STACS DNA. “In further expanding our ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... June 23, 2016 Apellis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ... clinical trials of its complement C3 inhibitor, APL-2. ... multiple ascending dose studies designed to assess the ... subcutaneous injection in healthy adult volunteers. ... as a single dose (ranging from 45 to ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 2016 Andrew D ... http://doi.org/10.17925/OHR.2016.12.01.22 Published recently in ... from touchONCOLOGY, Andrew D Zelenetz , discusses ... care is placing an increasing burden on healthcare ... therapies. With the patents on many biologics expiring, ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... ClinCapture, the only free validated ... will showcase its product’s latest features from June 26 to June 30, 2016 ... on Disrupting Clinical Trials in The Cloud during the conference. DIA (Drug ...
Breaking Biology Technology: